14

On the surface, Christ's suffering may not appear necessarily unique in respect to the levels or duration of either physical or emotional pain, but it was certainly unique in respect to the nature of the sufferer and the spiritual dimension of the suffering: The completely innocent Incarnate Creator suffering at the hands of his rebellious creation; and the ...


11

Short answer: The reason is, that Jesus' suffered and died in our place. This is how the bible puts it in Romans 5:6-8 ESV: 6 For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. 7 For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die— 8 but God shows his love for us in ...


10

We can identify several views regarding the suffering of Jesus. (1) That he did feel fear and grief, but did not sin. (2) That he did not feel fear, per se, but did feel grief. Within (2), there are differing understandings of why Jesus felt grief and agony. Those who (a) accept penal substitution will argue that he was suffering on behalf of his people, ...


7

The point Edwards makes here is that since God accomplishes his purposes in all things, even evil things, he cannot be said to be carried away by emotions and thus experience involuntary ecstasy or distress. But Edwards clearly admits that God can feel pleasure – the crucial point being that God, not the creature, is its ultimate source: Though he has real ...


7

It's true that the Bible says that man has "dominion" over the animals: And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.” (Genesis 1:28, ESV) But there are many, many passages in the Bible ...


7

Evangelical theologians teach that these two passages do not instruct us to "enjoy" trials in the sense of getting pleasure out of them. Rather, we are to have joy despite the trials, because we recognize them to be profitable. On James 1:2, Thomas Constable writes that the trials themselves are not the source of joy, but rather what they produce: ...


7

Yes, your arguments are correct. Here is some expansion and support… The first and best answer to suffering is the freewill defense. For God to make free creatures is worthwhile; truly free creatures are able to act for good or evil. People who cannot do certain things are not truly free. A person needs no other response, but other responses are available ...


6

Having buried my mother last week after seeing her go through progressively worse interventions due to complications from her pneumonia, I can only say that I wish more people would ask this question. Any Christianity that ignores the question of suffering neither addresses the reality of the Sin nor the biblical witness. The question of suffering is central ...


6

Now the question of who is the target audience for Job is a tricky one, because there is the audience that Job intended, and the audience that God intended. Since the book is not addressed to a group as are Paul's letters, or to a son as is the Book of Proverbs, or to Theophilus as are Luke and Acts, the best clues come from understanding the purpose of the ...


6

The suffering caused by the physical cross and by the soldiers was only a tiny portion of Christ's suffering. His suffering and death was vicarious, meaning, he suffered in our place, Christ died for our sins. God poured out upon His Son the wrath that was due to us. The wrath of God against sin is very great. Sinners will spend an eternity in Hell for ...


5

Any time you hear anything along the lines of "I'm trying to be a Christian", a giant red flag should immediately go up in your mind. Whoever said that is either playing fast and loose with words or they have completely missed the point. Being a Christian is a binary state (our position as either lost or saved in the eyes of God) that is not determined by ...


4

I think I know what you're getting at with this question, but you've got to consider what St. Paul says: Col 1:24 Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I am filling up what is lacking in the afflictions of Christ on behalf of his body, which is the church, And that was at the beginning of the Church. It's not that St. Paul thought ...


4

The extraordinary thing about Jesus' suffering is not so much its physical intensity, but the fact that He, the Second Person of the Trinity, deigned to suffer. He did not have to, but he specifically wished to save us by enduring suffering. We should also keep in mind that Jesus, being God, had (and has) perfect knowledge of all the sins committed in the ...


4

Jesus' death was sufficient simply because DEATH is the punishment for our sins, not suffering. Nowhere in the Bible does it say that the Savior must suffer for a long time to cover our sins, only His death. If you look at all these verses, we'll see that "Christ died" and it is enough: http://www.blueletterbible.org/search/search.cfm?Criteria=christ+died&...


4

TL:DR; Sleep does not cause temptation, prayer prevents it. How does sleep put the apostles into temptation? It doesn't. The most likely source of your question is that the cause and effect you attribute is a misunderstanding of the Scripture. On that scene in Matthew we can choose four insights of many, with sources and expanded discussion below. ...


4

The Greek phrase "wrath of God" is οργη θεου. The phrase appears only twice in the New Testament. John writes that the wrath of God will be visited upon those who do not believe in His Son (3:36). Paul writes that the wrath of God is revealed against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men (Romans 1:18). The same Greek phrase also appears ...


4

Sometimes people focus too much on Christ's sufferings and not how much he poured out His love on the cross. Redemption by Christ was not so much achieved by how much He suffered, but how much He loved us (CCC 616). Suffering without love has little to no value, or even be senseless. However, suffering with love for your brethren is what counts. You will be ...


4

Are there philosophical explanations for why God would allow animals to suffer due to non-human causes? St. Thomas Aquinas has something to say about it! The problem of animal suffering is the atheistic argument that an all-good, all-knowing, and all-powerful God would not use millions of years of animal suffering, disease, and death just to create a world ...


3

The other answer seems to largely explain it, and I was going to comment to add this but could not for want of rep. Genesis 9:3-4 states that: Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you; and just as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything. Only, you shall not eat flesh with its life, that is, its blood. (NRSVA) This seems to often be ...


3

Note: The quotes I offer here are taken from the 1983 Catechism of the Catholic Church. There is an online version here. Numbers are the paragraph numbers for each point. 601 The Scriptures had foretold this divine plan of salvation through the putting to death of “the righteous one, my Servant” as a mystery of universal redemption, that is, as the ransom ...


3

Here's a quote from G.K. Chesterton which I think explicates a Catholic view of the subject: “That a good man may have his back to the wall is no more than we knew already, but that God could have His back to the wall is a boast for all insurgents forever. Christianity is the only religion on earth that has felt that omnipotence made God incomplete. ...


3

The idea isn't that there was crucifixion or death or any number of people who have died and will die horrible deaths, but rather that it was Jesus the Messiah who had died. Who was Jesus the Messiah is the question. Once the OP knows the answer to that question, then the OP question is answered. Here's a hint. Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I ...


3

Reading your comments to the various fine answers already posted here tells me that your unstated question is "what has Jesus's suffering to do with being born again", rather than looking for the name of "heresy" you're committing. Don't be too hard on yourself (by feeling you're among the damned just because of the way the pastor ...


3

To experience suffering is to configure one's self to / with Christ ... already in the act of Baptism, which brings about a configuration with Christ, and then through his Sacrifice...the Church is continually being built up spiritually as the Body of Christ. In this Body, Christ wishes to be united with every individual, and in a special way he is united ...


3

Jesus warned his disciples that following Him would not be easy: Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will find it. What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone ...


3

No I don't really have references for this I will just answer it by logic alone. The atheist is making quite a few assumptions to make the leap from suffering to no Intelligent Designer (or indeed God). e.g. The Designer's morals are the same as his, and by extension the Designer's desire is to have no unnecessary suffering (from a mortal point of view). ...


2

I think we must start to be satisfied in the concept that 'God suffers' in some sense when we suffer, from the basic premise that he loves us. On the other hand, God can't suffer in the sense that it takes away the endless joy and boundless relaxed tranquility of the infinite pleasure he has in his perfect will, without any shadow of turning in his own joy. ...


2

You may not agree with me, but your question conflates a number of issues we need to unpack and reframe. If you bear with me I will try to explain why and perhaps in the process provide an answer to your question. If I infer correctly from the paragraph that follows your question (in bold print), you are wondering if any Christian thinkers have ever used ...


2

When considering a Christian who suffers terribly, I think the only real answer given in the Bible is the lesson learned by Job. One can talk the tough talk about how our faith will grow from our suffering and it is true. For various minor difficulties this really helps and if our faith is great virtually every difficulty seems minor. However, for many ...


2

While the four-star generals plan their theater operations in the Pentagon, the ground troops carry out the actual missions in the conflict. A company’s board of directors decide which products they will carry. However, it is the men and women with specialized skills in other departments who carry out the orders. The judge hands down the prison sentence, but ...


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