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Because the Catholic Church doesn't teach that we attain salvation only through the reception of God's grace by faith. That's why the Protestant teaching is called sola fide! The Catholic Catechism says: CCC 2010 Since the initiative belongs to God in the order of grace, no one can merit the initial grace of forgiveness and justification, at the ...


14

For most of a year following his trial at Worms in April 1521, Martin Luther was in seclusion. During this time his associates at Wittenberg were implementing practical changes in the church there. One of Luther's closest associates, Philip Melanchthon, was reluctant to move forward on some changes in fear that they might tend toward sin. If you are a ...


13

Protestants typically argue that Jesus is explaining how one might be "saved by works," and not suggesting that it is actually possible for the man to accomplish it on his own – on the contrary, he implies that it is impossible. John Gill's analysis is helpful: Our Lord intimates by this, that, according to the tenor of the law, eternal life was not to ...


11

Calvin The first extant writing to contain the phrase is John Calvin's Antidote to the Council of Trent (1547). First, for context, Calvin was responding to Canon 11 of the sixth session of the Council of Trent (which you can read at the above link): Whosoever shall say that men are justified by the mere imputation of Christ's righteousness, or by the ...


9

Laying the Groundwork The Transformation of Salvation It is important to note that, according to the Bible, the following things occur at the moment of salvation by faith alone: We, who were once dead, are made alive in Christ: When you were dead in your transgressions and the uncircumcision of your flesh, He made you alive together with Him, having ...


9

The correct understanding of this term is so fundamental in understanding the reformation. It certainly has nothing to do with linguistics or translations. It has everything to do with the doctrine of justification. There are only two sides to the issue. Catholics (and I believe Eastern Orthodox and the Syrian Churches) do not believe in a momentary or ...


9

This is a complex topic, for at least two reasons: 1) there was a wide diversity of thought in the pre-Reformation and Reformation periods, and 2) today's definitions of sola scriptura and sola fide vary and the particulars can be difficult to trace within the pre-Reformation and Reformation periods, and any attempts to do so are naturally susceptible to ...


8

Note that this doesn't apply to all groups that adhere to Sola Fide. Plenty of groups believe that we have no part in our own salvation, even in choosing to believe, but this is one perspective that's relatively common among Evangelicals. Short version: These verses are simply Jesus teaching on the true definition of what God's standard for "good" is. ...


8

I intend to respond considering primarily the 'mainstream' Protestant denominations, with minimal (if any) reference to the more obscure sects. This is because I think the term 'Protestant' belongs to those who accept a handful of certain beliefs (trinity, faith-centered outlook, etc) that are often not present in the more rare denominations. Referring to ...


8

There are two primary ways that sola fide theologians deal with this issue, and there is ongoing debate between them over it (cf. Lordship salvation controversy). I'll first address the historical view (sometimes called "Lordship salvation") and the more recent view, called "free grace theology." Lordship salvation The name commonly ...


7

First, a Lutheran is not likely to recognize the phrase "salvation by faith". The usual construct Lutherans use is "justification by faith". For Lutherans, there is a distinction between the two. Salvation was assured by Jesus' death and resurrection. Justification assures believers that they are made worthy of the salvation secured for them by Jesus ...


6

Below I've tried to summarize Calvin's views and then characterize Pelagius' as they relate to salvation by faith alone. All quotes from Calvin below are from his Institutes of the Christian religion. I will therefore just reference chapter and part in my quotes from Calvin. I left Luther out, because I don't have any of his books on hand. Faith Alone ...


6

These two slogans were used to explain two major disagreements Protestants had with what the Catholic Church was teaching, and yes, they are designed to work together! They don't compete, they are alone in their own respective fields. Sola Fide refers to the belief that works are not a means or prerequisite for salvation. People are declared to be justified ...


6

The doctrine of Sola fide (Latin for "by faith alone") holds that: God's pardon for guilty sinners is granted to and received through faith alone, excluding all "works." And that: God, on the basis of the life, death, and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ alone (solus Christus), grants sinners judicial pardon, or justification, which is received ...


5

The gospel never promises anyone with fake faith salvation. Rather it uses both encouragements and warnings as a means to preserve all the elect into everlasting eternity. This sort of question can be asked from many verses in the Bible because it rests upon a sometimes-unconscious assumption that ‘God would never warn someone of something, that according ...


5

Yes, clearly and obviously, Luther added the word "alone" to his translation. But that's not the real question to ask. If you'll permit a small digression, the real question is why. It is clear that his reason is to make the meaning of the greek in the receptor language (german). In other words, the greek carries with it the nuance of 'alone' in the greek ...


5

I would just like to expand on @Dan's comments regarding the catholic (lower-case c) perspective on faith and works. In the Roman rite of Christian Orthodoxy (aka Roman Catholic), the concept of salvation is explained by sola gratia (as in salvation only by grace), rather the the sola fide doctrine conceived by Martin Luther. If one is truly coporating with ...


5

According to the New Bible Dictionary, 2nd Ed., "Justifiction" entry, Paul used justify as a technical term, but James used it in a general sense of being vindicated, or proved genuine and right with God and man (p. 649). "James quotes Gn. 15:6 for the same purpose as Paul does -- to show that it was faith that secured Abraham's acceptance. But now, he ...


5

I'd like to focus on the following part of your question because it is not answered, yet: If ..., why did the Protestant Reformation happen? This question implies that the main reasons for the separation of the Catholic and the Protestant Church were of religious nature. When learning about Luther's time in history lessons in school here in Germany, we ...


4

Yes - the wikipedia article on sola fide baldly asserts that Augustine is among the "Church Fathers whom Protestant apologists believe taught the doctrine of Sola Fide (although Catholic and Orthodox apologists quote the same fathers as supporting a justification that includes works)." Confusion in this regard, results from differing definitions of ...


4

Seventh Day Adventists is also a mainstream protestant denomination (with trinity, faith-centered outlook, etc) that stresses faith but places importance on the fruits of faith for salvation. As many founders were methodists who embraced the Millerite movement, methodists and Seventh Day Adventists share some commonality in their understanding of salvation. ...


4

This verse by itself may seem to some that it is implying works based salvation, but upon further examination, this is not necessarily the case. Proponents of Sola Fide would cite the context of the passage and also the harmony of Scripture to argue that Jame's language doesn't actually suggest works based salvation. The Verse's Context To understand the ...


4

While it is true that one can say the Eastern Orthodox proclaims "salvation by grace through faith", the eastern understanding of what exactly salvation is departs radically from that of western Christianity. This was actually made clear in the local Orthodox Church tract another answer referenced, but seems to have been overlooked (p.78-79): The problem ...


3

According to Emanuel Swedenborg, faith without works does not save a person (Note: This section can be skipped by those who are interested only in the Swedenborgian interpretation of Luke 23:39-43. The purpose of this section is to establish that Swedenborg, and Swedenborgians, reject justification by faith alone, and believe that good works are also ...


3

Yes, the two doctrines are quite different, you cannot be saved by your works, but there must be works with your faith for you to find salvation. In other words, it's not the works that saves your soul, but without the works your faith is in vain and of none effect. If I keep telling you that I believe the chair in front of us will hold me up, but I never ...


3

I think it would also be helpful to say that 'salvation by faith' is not something that only Paul talks about. He maintained that this had its bases in Old Testament scripture too when he quoted Genesis 15:6, 'And he [Abraham] believed in the LORD; and he counted it to him for righteousness' (AV/KJV). This is at a time way before the Law had been delivered ...


3

Sola Fide answers "how do you get saved." The parable of the talents addresses, what is my reward, once I am saved. Even the most Calvinistic sole ride adherent still believes that you should work for the kingdom. Whether or not you get to heaven may not be in your control, but how well you have pleased the Master once you are there most certainly is. ...


3

The Catechism is quite clear. Faith is absolutely necessary. 161 Believing in Jesus Christ and in the One who sent him for our salvation is necessary for obtaining that salvation.42 'Since "without faith it is impossible to please (God)" and to attain to the fellowship of his sons, therefore without faith no one has ever attained justification, nor will ...


3

I have not found any reference which lists precisely the church fathers that Luther read (and was influenced by) other than Augustine. Certainly of the church fathers, Augustine was a strong influence on Luther's development of his theology. Martin Luther himself said in 1516 (or 1518? He published two editions of the book) in the preface of the Theologia ...


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