Hot answers tagged

15

No, he did not address the issue of slavery in any published works. We know this because of a recently published paper revealing an unpublished draft letter by Edwards that does deal with slavery. It is described by the paper author thus: It is the only known instance of Edwards writing, however abstrusely, about slavery. Also it discloses differing ...


11

In America at least, the word "slave" has a connotative meaning that conjures up images of slavery prior to the Civil War, where people were beaten, mistreated, sold indiscriminately, and many other horrors. In the Bible, slavery was much different. For one thing, a slave would only be a slave for six years and then had to be set free. When he was set ...


11

No, none of the ecumenical councils prohibit slavery, or deal with the subject to any significant extent. The closest connection to slavery that I have found in the ecumenical councils is the Council of Chalcedon (fourth ecumenical council, AD 451), which ratified as ecumenical the canons of the Synod of Gangra (340). This local council condemned several ...


10

Although he never published his view on the subject, according to a book called "Slavery and Sin: The Fight Against Slavery and the Rise of Liberal Protestantism" By Molly Oshatz, Edwards was just slightly opposed to slavery in that he questioned the slave trade as it was existing and practiced, while not opposing the concept of having a slave if recognizing ...


9

Translation philosophy The translator's job is to pick the best word(s) to fit their translation philosophy. This could mean the most "literal" (i.e. technically accurate, ignoring connotations) term, or it could mean trying to most accurately capture the intent of the original author, even if that means changing the words. The first option is called "...


8

The word servant used here is the Greek word doulos (δοῦλος, Strong's G1401). It can mean either a slave, servant, or bond-servant (similar to indentured servant). But in the Roman society of the time there was very little difference between them, since what we now think of as civil rights only applied to Roman citizens. Slave or not, a Roman master had ...


7

I do not think the Church has any official position, or any reason to have one. In the link provided, Rev. Farrakhan is quoting a papal bull dating from 1452, that is essentially authorizing the Portuguese king, Alfonso V, to conduct a new crusade against the "Saracens" (probably the Ottoman Empire). In it, there is a phrase in which the pope ...


5

The story appears in Butler's Lives of Saints, a standard reference for many saints' histories. The relevant part of the (brief) Butler's entry reads: St. Gregory the Great tells us that when the Vandals of Africa had made a descent on Campania, Paulinus spent all he had in relieving the distress of his people and redeeming them from slavery. At last there ...


5

I have not been able to find evidence of a Baptist argument for slavery that differs from other pro-slavery denominations. Baptist minister Richard Furman (for whom Furman University was named) published a philosophical defense of slavery that alluded to biblical support but did not elaborate on it. The proof texts would have been well known to his readers. ...


5

Are we God's slaves? 1 Corinthians 6:12-20 12“I have the right to do anything,” you say—but not everything is beneficial. “I have the right to do anything”—but I will not be mastered by anything. 13You say, “Food for the stomach and the stomach for food, and God will destroy them both.” The body, however, is not meant for sexual immorality but for the ...


5

Robert Bruce Mullin says in 'North America', published in A World History of Christianity (edited by Adrian Hastings), pages 437-8, that Southern religious figures claimed not only that was slavery a positive good, but that it was a Christian institution. This slavery argument gained a specific religious dimension, and the northern Protestants faced a ...


5

The Year of Jubilee Every 50 years, the Jews were required to return any land they had bought back to its original owners, as well as set all their slaves (who wanted to be freed) free. This is what Levicitus 25:10 is talking about. Hebrew slaves were already ordered to be freed every seventh year (Ex 21:2), for slavery among Hebrew brethren was always ...


5

The MacArthur New Testament Commentary has this to say: There is a word in the Old Testament for “slave” that appears eleven hundred times, but in your English Bible [KJV] it’s translated “slave” once. If you go to the New Testament, you will find the Greek word for “slave” about 150 times in all its forms. And you will find it actually translated “slave” ...


4

Historically, these verses have not been applied to employer/employee relations, at least not in the sense that we understand employment today. In ancient times slavery was fairly common; employment, however, was not. Most free people lived and worked on the family farm. Employment contracts did exist, but only to protect the employer's interests. Contracts ...


4

Jonathan Edwards the lesser (1745-1801) wrote The injustice and impolicy of the slave trade, and of the slavery of the Africans. Perhaps, though this truth be clearly demonstrable both from reason and revelation, you scarcely dare receive it, because it seems to bear hardly on the characters of our pious fathers, who held slaves. But they did it ...


4

We think of slavery negatively because in our most recent examples of it the slave owners were frequently abusive, and the society gave no way to escape the slave system. The Biblical slavery system was different, but that's really a different topic. As our creator, God is our king and ruler. We were designed to serve him, ruling over this world as his ...


4

You're correct that nowhere in the Gospels does Jesus condone slavery--nor does he speak out against it. Outside the Gospels, numerous Bible passages have been used in defense of slavery through the years. The starting point for Christian justification of slavery is Genesis 9:24-27. When Noah awoke from his wine and knew what his youngest son had done ...


4

Has a slave served as a priest? Geremia does a great job in demonstrating that a being a slave is a serious impediment to being ordained. Nevertheless the Church does have examples of ex-slaves being ordained priests and even consecrated bishops and eventually canonized a saint. The following are a few examples: St. Patrick Servant of God, Fr. Augustus ...


4

The Latin phrase translates as “Athanasius against the world.” Athanasius was a Christian theologian, a Church Father, and the chief defender of Trinitarianism against Arianism. He battled against the Arian heresy prevalent in the fourth century and his persistence resulted in the defeat of his detractors. Here is a brief overview: In 325, at the age of ...


3

You ask what compelled Wesley to take on slavery and become one of the early adopters of abolition. I found a somewhat lengthy and wordy paper on this subject and have extracted a few paragraphs that may be helpful: https://brycchancarey.com/Carey_BJRL_2003.pdf 2/16: Wesley's life coincided with the height of the British transatlantic slave trade. Britain ...


3

Condemnation of 'unjust' slavery came somewhat earlier than papal condemnation of 'just' slavery. The legitimacy of slavery was recognised in the Corpus Iuris Canonici, promulgated by Pope Gregory IX, and this implicit acceptance of slavery was not removed until 1913. Jean Allain (The Legal Understanding of Slavery, page 20) says the Corpus Iuris Canonici ...


3

In a limited sense, yes, some Reformed paedobaptists have supported this: the presentation of slave children for baptism by their masters was practiced and supported in the Presbyterian Church in the USA in the antebellum period. However, I find no evidence that adult slaves were baptized except upon their own conversion (that is, not when the master was ...


3

Whenever one runs into a problematic verse, look it up in multiple translations. http://biblehub.com/1_peter/2.htm Two translations there use the word servant instead of slave. The term bondservant, more akin to indentured servitude, used in various places by several translations gives a better idea of slavery under Israel law instead of 21st century ...


3

SHORT ANSWER One major example is the USA Southern States (The South) in the four or five decades leading up to the Civil War of the USA (1860's). Slavery was very common in The South and using the Bible and other religious arguments was very common to justify the morality of it. Although the verses you site were not as commonly used, except perhaps 1 ...


2

Abolitionists generally took an indirect approach in arguing against slavery. Acknowledging that slavery appears in the Bible without an absolute prohibition, they argued from basic Christian principles. John Hepburn, an 18th century Quaker from New Jersey, built a case against slavery (PDF) based on the ideas of free will and the Golden Rule. First, ...


2

Does the Catholic Church have an official position on slavery reparations? There are two basis for reparations, a legal basis and a moral basis. Either one would require a more specific identification of the injured party and the responsible party. Also a more specific definition of terms would have to be used as throughout history slavery of varying ...


2

Numerous hagiographies exist for saints, real or imagined, in the period prior to the fourth century, but in many cases they are simply traditions that grew over time. Wikipedia reports the tradition that Paulinus is revered for giving up his wealth, but says nothing of him volunteering as a slave in order to save another. A Catholic online resource goes ...


2

Slavery is an impediment to receiving the sacrament of Holy Orders. 1917 Code* canon 987 §4 (cf. 1983 Code canon 1042): The [following] are simply impeded [from receiving Holy Orders]:[…]4.° Those who are strictly speaking slaves before receiving liberty;[Latin original: "Servi servitute proprie dicta ante acceptam libertatem"] Canonist Dom Charles ...


1

The Israelites and Jews had slaves throughout the biblical period, as various passages of the Bible attest. Exodus 12:44 talks of the purchase of slaves and the need for them to be circumcised, which implies that these were non-Hebrew slaves. As the question implies, it seems anachronistic that the fleeing slaves would have had slaves at the start of the ...


1

Michael Card's hypothesis is interesting, and certainly not outside the realm of possibility. It is quite true that skilled Greeks were enslaved and brought to Italy during times of conquest and revolt, and perhaps even during times of peace between Greece and Rome, such as was the case when Luke was living. But it seems to me that Card's main argument ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible