15

1 “Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of others to be seen by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven. (Matthew 6:1) In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven. (Matthew 5:16) God is telling us not to be prideful and boast in ...


11

It's not so much something lost in translation, though there may be some cultural factors coming into play. Jews considered the Words of the ten commandments to be minimum requirements, and beginning with Matthew 5:21, Jesus expounds on some the commandments pertaining to the relationship to other other people. The essence of the teaching in Matthew 5:21 ff ...


9

In context, Jesus just taught his disciples not to judge in Matthew 7:1-5. The kind of judgment Jesus meant is the judgment of a critical and censorious spirit. That kind of judgment seeks to impute motivations to behaviors one person observes in another person. Since quite frequently, people have a tendency to project their own failings onto other people, ...


9

Check out the easy to read version (more at my level, haha ;) : Matthew 6:1-18 Easy-to-Read Version (ERV) Jesus Teaches About Giving 6 “Be careful! When you do something good, don’t do it in front of others so that they will see you. If you do that, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven. 2 “When you give to those who are ...


8

In early times, salt was substantially more significant than it is today. (E.g., see the etymology for salarium at Wikipedia.) Salt has some association with holiness; it was part of the grain offerings (Leviticus 2:13 [NIV]): Season all your grain offerings with salt. Do not leave the salt of the covenant of your God out of your grain offerings, add ...


7

Salt fulfills a very specific purpose which other more valuable things do not. One significant thing salt is used for is as a preservative. In the age before refrigeration, this was very important. To apply this symbolically to followers of Christ, it would seem that they serve to preserve the purity of the world. As it was in the days of Noah, there is ...


7

From Wikipedia Scholars do not agree about its etymology, but it is theorized that Mammon derives from Late Latin mammon, from Greek "μαμμωνάς", Syriac mámóna ("riches"), Aramaic mamon ("riches, money"), a loanword from Mishnaic Hebrew 'ממון (mmôn) meaning money, wealth, or possessions;[8] although it may also have meant "that in which one trusts". And ...


5

I'll handle these questions in two parts: first, the connection between the words blessed and elect (including, as you request, a definition of blessed), and second, if the qualities listed are somehow indications of whether someone is elect or not. Connection between blessed and elect It's very clear to Calvinists, and, I suspect, to at least most ...


5

The Catholic Haydock Commentary says this about Mt. 5:6: Ver. 6. Hunger and thirst; i.e. spiritually, with an earnest desire of being just and holy. But others again understand such as endure with patience the hardships of hunger and thirst. (Witham) --- Rupertus understands those to whom justice is denied, such as poor widows and orphans. Maldonatus ...


3

First of all, it's interesting to note that in John 8:12, Jesus says, 'I [Jesus] am the light of the world," but here he says that "You [the Jewish followers of Jesus listening to Him at that time] are the light of the world." One understanding of this is that Jesus is the light source, while we are the light rays. Another way to understand it is that ...


2

At that stage in Jesus' ministry there were crowds following him around just about everywhere he went and there would have been teaching times interspersed in most of his days. While similar crowds might have heard similar things on various other days as well, there is no particular indication that the specific event of that sermon would have taken any more ...


2

Before I give my suggested answer I would like to draw your attention to: 1.Mammon is a wrong spelling. The correct spelling is mamon. If you are familiar with Aramaic, it's probably a Greek scribal error of Aramaic: m mon 2.Various bible translations render it either money or gold or riches or wealth or just keep it as it is, mammon , sometimes with ...


2

If you set up that kind of a false dichotomy -- that the disciples left Jesus at the end, and thus they were not believers here -- then none of the teachings of Jesus were given to believers. In the mind of Jesus, the disciples were believers in training. These were those which he had personally selected and through whom he was going to build and establish ...


2

TL;DR -- Context lets them coexist without contradiction. The longer version: God's word to Jeremiah in the first passage represented specific instructions for a specific mission. At the base level of common sense, it would be a mistake to interpret those instructions as any kind of a generalized principle -- any more than God's word to Noah means that we'...


2

Yes it is a sin, provided the divorced person was truly married. What is meant by “truly married”, you say? In short it is when two people get married AND the outward appearances of marriage do indeed reflect the inner convictions of both. If this is not the case, it is possible to get what is called an annulment, which can be considered a divorce but ...


2

In Proverbs 9.8, 26:1-11 (and many more), the Bible talks about the fool. A fool is characterized as unteachable, therefore unwise in this passage. The passage tells us that there is no sense to invest into the unteachable. There is only one things you might do: discipline the fool. But still, that does not benefit the fool, but the teachable that watches ...


1

Let's look at the narrow context: Adultery 27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 29 If your right eye causes you to stumble, gouge it out and throw it away. It is better for you to lose one part of ...


1

Jeremiah was about 17 years of age when the Lord commissioned him to be a prophet: “I appointed you as a prophet to the nations” (Jeremiah 1:5). This commission was to last for 40 years. The purpose was for God to demonstrate his patience with a nation that had rejected him and turned to idolatry. God knew his warnings would be rejected, but nonetheless, ...


1

The expression dogs in the gospels refers to those who are not Jews. So the disciples of Christ are not to give things which are holy or sacred to those who have no understanding of what a sacred thing is. It's the Jews that were educated by the Lord as to what was sacred. Pearls is used here as a precious thing that the wealthy understand and appreciate. No ...


1

The root of this teaching is to show us more about murder. Specifically murder that spawns from arguments and the ruthlessness of the people. There is a reason that Gehenna was translated as Hell. But for the purposes of Today's English Language. If we where to directly translate the concept would have better to translate the word as Crematory. So he starts ...


1

This same question popped up at the Hermeneutics StackExchange, here: Are good works supposed to be seen or not? My answer there is pasted below. While these two statements may seem self-contradictory, there is a fine line which differentiates them. TL;DR: Matthew 5:16 says you should not ever be ashamed to do God's work in public. However, Matthew 6:1 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible