16

There are a few. Some of them are published as academic works, while others are intended for the common use and worship (especially in Eastern Orthodox Churches). The first was The Holy Bible containing the Old and New Covenant, translated by Charles Thomson in 1808 (though he did not include the apocrypha). It can still be bought today. The translation was ...


12

It is highly unlikely. I will address the OP's commentary/questions in turn: The reason why I ask this is because I can't really seem to find much proof of the age of the Septuagint. I offer the following pedantic quibble only because it is directly relevant to OP's concern: when considering the historical creation of the Greek Jewish scriptures, it is ...


6

The word "Sheol" was not coined by the scribes of the Greek Septuagint. It is Hebrew. One reference is Strong's Concordance and Lexicon, in which its rendering in Deuteronomy 32:22 has Hebrew word ID number 7585, shin aleph vav lamed (right to left): שְׁאֹ֣ול Phonology of the Hebrew "aleph" is variable, and "vav" changes too, ...


5

First, I’d like to give a bit of background on the different OT manuscripts. The OT in English Bibles is almost always based off the Masoretic text and the Dead Sea Scrolls, but some use the Septuagint. The KJV uses the Masoretic. There are some discrepancies between the Septuagint and the Masoretic; nineteen times out of twenty, the Dead Sea Scrolls agree ...


5

The issue of New Testament quotations of the Old Testament is broad and well-studied, so it's well worth reading a book like John Wenham's Christ and the Bible to get a feel for the complexities. For example, not only is there a diverse manuscript tradition for the gospels, there are also multiple versions of the Septuagint, and there's always the ...


5

Here is an answer from a Jewish perspective. The Bible calls G-d Y-h-v-h, which is called “the Tetragrammaton,” which means a four-letter word. While the Tetragrammaton appears on Torah scrolls, even today, Jews say it as Adonai whenever they read the Torah (more on that later). Many think that this is the name of G-d in the Hebrew Bible, but this is not ...


4

Does the Old Testament word ”Sheol” have Greek or Hebrew origins? The word ”Sheol” is of Hebrew origins. However it may be somewhat a Assyro-Babylonian loan-word for "Shu'alu.” Etymology The word ”Sheol” was for some time regarded as an Assyro-Babylonian loan-word, "Shu'alu," having the assumed meaning "the place whither the dead are ...


4

As also born again Christian, I can offer you some insight, although I'm not sure this will be a suitable question for this website format overall. Does Bible translation matter? Yes and no. Bibles tend to be weighed according to two different qualities. Each translation is a mixture of the two. They are "Word for word" and "Thought for Thought". A pure ...


3

These comments pertain only to the Septuagint portion of the question. OP elaborates in comments: I was wondering if anyone has attempted to restore the original Hebrew text on which the LXX was based by back-translating the LXX into Hebrew. The interest, then, is driven by a text-critical question and requests a reconstructed text.* In the modern era, ...


3

One place to start would be with the first edition of the work, which is available on Wikimedia Commons (only the 2nd volume and supplement are on Google Books). From what I can tell, the second edition closely follows the first, so the list of abbreviations and symbols (found in the supplement) should be helpful:


2

On the Textus Receptus website, Julia Smith's translation is listed on the right hand side column underneath Green's Literal Version. So, you can look up any verse of the Old or New Testament and see that verse as Smith translated it. The full text can also be read on Biblehub


2

I’m trying to compile the History of the Bible, at least the Christian recognition of what was inspired and what wasn’t in the Old Testament. Best way to see what Christians recognized as inspired and what wasn't is to let them speak for themselves. Let's review what the early church quoted as inspired scripture. ~80 AD: Clement of Rome Quotes from Book of ...


2

The earliest Old Testament canon is mentioned by Josephus circa 95CE, as well as the reason why they considered it "from God". From there, it's history is shown by Melito of Sardis circa 175CE. These earliest canons never included what came to be called the apocrypha. Josephus Although he does not name specific books, it is quite clear to which ...


2

The English word “God” (“got” in German and “Godh” in Iceland) is derived from a root to call, meaning to call upon. It does not denote an anthropomorphic and anthropopathic being. For G-d has no human form and emotion. The Torah describes G-d as a “he” because, as Rabbi Ishmael said, “The Torah speaks in human language,” so that humans can understand. For ...


2

Jesus was quoting Aramaic. Not Septuagint. Aramaic was the spoken language of first century Israel. According to first century Jewish historian, Josephus, Jews didn't speak Greek in first century Israel. He wrote: "I have also taken a great deal of pains to obtain the learning of the Greeks, and understand the elements of the Greek language, although I ...


2

I can think of one example. Matthew 21:16 (KJV) And said unto him, Hearest thou what these say? And Jesus saith unto them, Yea; have ye never read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings thou hast perfected praise? Psalm 8:2 (KJV/following Masoretic) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine ...


2

Charles Van der Pool does not specify in the introduction whether his translation included Masoretic influences, but from what he does say, it is doubtful. He makes a concerted effort throughout the introduction to express that there is value in the Greek Old Testament that cannot be had with any other translation. I've included his words below from page v ...


2

No, the entirety, more or less,1 of the Old Testament seems to have had a Greek version or translation since the second century at least, based on the translator's Prologue to the Greek version of Ben Sira (a.k.a Wisdom of Sirach and Ecclesiasticus). In a collection of papers on the Book (from 2006),2 it is taken for granted that the rest of the Books of the ...


2

The canon by which we can, at least in part, compare the texts, would be with the DSS manuscripts and fragments. They tended, greatly, to agree with the LXX over the MT. (I think the ratio was 13-1). I love Hebrew but have found that oldest extant copies of the OT are in Greek. The Words of the NT generally agree with the LXX over the MT. I would also point ...


1

A question of reliability ultimately appeals to a method for determining such, an answer this open is hard to answer except for by the answerers feelings, as is demonstrated in the first answer to this question. The reliability of the dead sea scrolls is that of fragments and many are isolated fragments, meaning they have no counterpart to know the whole ...


1

Translations of the NT (originally in Greek) into Hebrew abound. Modern versions are for instance available in the Biblical Society of Israel. Older versions are found online (e.g. here, and any other "polyglot bible"; see below). The trouble is with translations of LXX, in particular with the translation to Hebrew of the texts that are unique to the LXX (i....


1

The New International Version is in perfect harmony with Jesus' quoting from Psalm 8:2 in Matthew 21:16: "Do you hear what these children are saying" they asked him. "Yes," replied Jesus, "have you never read, "'From the lips of children and infants you have ordained praise'?" "From the lips of children and infants you have ordained praise" (Psalm 8:...


1

Protestant authors Archer and Chirichigno list 340 places where the New Testament cites the Septuagint but only 33 places where it cites from the Masoretic Text rather than the Septuagint (G. Archer and G. C. Chirichigno, Old Testament Quotations in the New Testament: A Complete Survey, 25-32). https://www.catholic.com/qa/in-which-passages-does-jesus-quote-...


1

I tried putting this as only a comment to your good answer, Zenon, but it really wasn't the proper place; comments are usually just temporary. The Apostolic Bible has this in their version of Psalm 13:3 "All turned aside together; they were made useless; there is not one doing that which is good; there is not even one" ...and that's it, whereas the LXX ...


1

Just because originally only the Pentateuch was translated into Greek doesn't mean that the rest wasn't translated later. The date of the 3rd century BCE is supported (for the Torah translation) by a number of factors, including the Greek being representative of early Koine, citations beginning as early as the 2nd century BCE, and early manuscripts datable ...


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