13

Scripturally speaking, Jesus isn't going to return quietly. Several passages refer to what is going to happen when he returns. 1 Thessalonians 4:15-17: For this we declare to you by a word from the Lord, that we who are alive, who are left until the coming of the Lord, will not precede those who have fallen asleep. For the Lord himself will descend ...


11

Yes. Every significant Christian tradition affirms the return of Jesus. The Nicene Creed, adopted by the Universal manifestation of the assembled church in 325AD and accepted by just about every mainline Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox church with which the average Westerner will most readily identify affirms: He will come again in glory to judge the ...


10

That death and "sleeping," are often conflated in Scripture is perhaps a useful metaphor here. Notice how, in 1 Corinthians 15, Paul likens those who have died to those who have "fallen asleep in Christ." And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. 19 If ...


8

I would argue that most churches accept this quite literally, and that the exceptions prove the rule. Three great examples in the last 150 years of trying to pick a date are as follows: The Millerites who, in following Miller, were convinced Jesus was coming back in 1844. Ed Whiseant's "88 Reasons the Lord is Coming Back in 1988" Harold Camping's date of ...


8

This idea primarily comes from the teachings of Ellen G. White, whom the Seventh-day Adventists consider a modern-day prophet. Early Writings, p 65: The pope has changed the day of rest from the seventh to the first day. He has thought to change the very commandment that was given to cause man to remember his Creator. He has thought to change the ...


8

On the whole, yes, virtually all traditions expect his return. The only exceptions I know of are theological liberals, who don't regard the Bible or its foretellings (even on the lips of Jesus) to be reliable, and some few preterists (viz., sometimes called full preterists or hyper-preterists, in distinction from partial preterists, who do expect a final ...


8

I know I should probably reference these, but I'm going to appeal to common knowledge Before answering, I just want to re-emphasize two central teachings that are common to the vast majority of Christianity: It's safe to say that almost every denomination, and almost every major division within Christianity agrees that God does not and cannot lie. I'm ...


7

I think to answer your question we have to address some foundational items of Christianity. First Christianity is a religion based on being saved by grace. Nothing done by you will warrant salvation for your soul. (Romans 3:23 (No one is good enough), Romans 6:23 (God gives us the gift of salvation), Ephesians 2:8 (Grace saved us)). It seems that the ...


6

I think you might be overthinking this. Going by NKJV, Acts 9:1-9, Christ did not necessarily "appear" physically. Verses 3-4 only indicate that Paul heard a voice and saw a light, and that light could have been anything As he journeyed he came near Damascus, and suddenly a light shone around him from heaven. 4 Then he fell to the ground, and heard a ...


5

The Biblical predictions refers to the predictions found in Revelation of the reunification of Church and State, specifically in America, in the last days. Below is what is believed by most Seventh Day Adventists: In Rev 12:13-16, we see that God's church (the women) was a persecuted church throughout history. She existed through a time where there was no ...


4

I believe these are the two main candidates for what you are after: And this gospel of the kingdom will be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come. - Matthew 24:14 NIV The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but ...


4

The Sadducees did not believe in the resurrection of the dead, the question was simply a set up. Even though they did not believe in this, the resurrection they are referring to is the resurrection of dead the Pharisees believe in, which according to Act 23 is similar to what Paul (Christians) believes in. 6 But when Paul perceived that the one part were ...


4

It depends on your definition of the Messianic Age. According to the Catholic Catechism and its interpretation of the Nicene Creed, Jesus is the Christ, the Messiah (436) The word "Christ" comes from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Messiah, which means "anointed". It became the name proper to Jesus only because he accomplished perfectly the divine ...


4

The second century apologist Justin Martyr discussed the two comings in his Dialogue with the Jew Trypho. I'll give a chapter of it here and list a few chapter titles with a link to the entire text. '' CHAPTER XXXII -- TRYPHO OBJECTING THAT CHRIST IS DESCRIBED AS GLORIOUS BY DANIEL, JUSTIN DISTINGUISHES TWO ADVENTS. And when I had ceased, Trypho said, "...


3

The idea is not that all Jews will be reconciled to God, but that a remnant will repent and return to the Lord in the last days. Paul explains it this way: (speaking of Israel:) I say then, God has not rejected His people, has He? May it never be! For I too am an Israelite, a descendant of Abraham, of the tribe of Benjamin. God has not rejected His people ...


2

This is what Jesus said: 36 “But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father only. 37 For as were the days of Noah, so will be the coming of the Son of Man. 38 For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day when Noah ...


2

Jesus clearly distinguishes Himself from all the false christs in Matthew 24: Mat 24:23 Then if any man shall say unto you, Lo, here is Christ, or there; believe it not. Mat 24:24 For there shall arise false Christs, and false prophets, and shall shew great signs and wonders; insomuch that, if it were possible, they shall deceive the very elect. Jesus ...


2

As you note, the Bible supports the idea that the spirits of the righteous dead rest in their own place, called "Paradise," which is distinct from "Heaven," (the home of God,) until the resurrection and the final judgment. (Compare Luke 23:39-42 with John 20:15-17 or see my answer here for further detail on the subject.) As for why that idea doesn't get ...


2

The bible doesn't speak of a Messianic Age. The Jews do, also called the "Age to Come," the "Future Age," and the "World to Come"; and it included the judgement of mankind and the resurrection of the dead. Likewise, Catholics believe the 2nd Coming is the Last Day/ Judgement Day and it includes the resurrection of the dead. If there was an appropriate term ...


2

One of the basic precepts of Christianity, as well as Judaism, is that there is an eternal portion of the human being which is eternal, and known as the soul. That precept is loosely based on the idea that man was created in God's image. Looking at Genesis, we find; Genesis 1:27 KJV So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; ...


2

OK, for the purpose of full disclosure before this question is closed and borrowing heavily from my original comment.... Nine Rivers from Jordan, The Chronicle of a Journey and a Search by Denis Johnston I suspect the reference comes from Irishman Denis Johnston's book Nine Rivers from Jordan, The Chronicle of a Journey and a Search. The quotation comes from ...


2

It really does depend on your eschatological view. Futurists/Dispensationalist want to place passages like Luke 21:12 in the future before the second coming of Christ. However, Partial Preterists/Covenantalists as well as some Amillennialists (like myself) see passages Luke 21, Matthew 24 and Mark 13 as Jesus' prophecy of the destruction of the temple in 70 ...


2

This part of this revelation speaks about 2 things: Darkness and corruption and Vengeance. This part of section 112 is not taking about corruption in the church today, it's talking about the state of the world when the church was organized. It is not a prophecy about the spreading of corruption in the church, rather the coming of judgement to the world. ...


2

The church father Irenaeus  (130-202) said there were many names that could be produced from the number, and he speculates about the name using the “Greek fashion of calculation”, using the value of the letters contained in 666 and trying to mathematically produce a name. He attributes the erroneous number 616 to a copyist error, and states that none of the ...


2

Are there Christian churches that believe in isolated living? The short answer is yes First of all, there are the Amish. They more or less live separated from the world. A central concept behind much of the Amish lifestyle and practice is the idea of separation from the world. Of course, the Amish would agree that this means to be separate from overtly ...


1

The Sadducees are not talking about the resurrection of Jesus, or of the general resurrection on Jesus return. The specifics you describe are based on scriptures which were not written at the time the question was asked. Nonetheless there was a general belief at the time of Jesus in a resurrection, based on the book of Daniel and other Jewish writings. ...


1

There is only one resurrection where both the righteous and wicked will rise and be judged. (See Dan. 12:2) Paul expands on the resurrection and what to expect, but from my reading the Bible, there is only a single event. Jesus corrects the Sadducees, stating that there is no marriage in the world to come. The Sadducees' question was a set up.


1

To understand this verse you must have a clear understanding of what "The Kingdom of God" actually is. A King's kingdom is where he is obeyed completely. His rule and reign are complete. So when Jesus uses this term it can easily be misinterpreted to mean a coming "thing" or heaven or some other such distant and more nebulous unexplained item. The more ...


1

Yes! There is a tradition that came from Israel, which is now nearly 2,000 years old. It depends on how you look at it. You could call it a Jewish tradition. You could call it a Christian tradition. You could call it an Israel tradition. The reality is, it's all 3. (There are people who are simultaneously Jewish + Christian + Lutheran. It's possible to be ...


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