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17

In this video I explored reasons that there is sometimes strain between faith and science. If, because I am a man of faith and I love science, I am not the target audience you're looking for, I can move this to a comment. My principle observation, as it relates to the OP, is that many people of faith (particularly in my country) are accustomed to being told ...


13

Those creationist Christians typically place the "extinction event" in Noah's day, thus long after the fall of the historic Adam. An example is from the well-known Young Earth model defender, Institute for Creation Research, who published a rebuttal in their 2001 article Chicxulub and the Demise of the Dinosaurs written by one of their scholars: ...


12

A significant fraction of Evangelical Christians also believe in "Young Earth Creationism", which is to say they take Genesis 1-3 at face value and believe that the Earth is ~6,000-7,000 years old and that life was created by God. This is of course in direct contradiction to the currently prevalent strict-Naturalist viewpoint (which necessitates ...


8

To expand on GratefulDisciple's answer... ...the short version is that a lot of them don't. There are, as I see it, three-and-a-half options. GratefulDisciple already explained the "young-Earth Creationist" approach, which is to "reconcile" the two views by rejecting the Uniformitarianist worldview outright. There are many excellent ...


8

The literal answer is that YECs "account" for no such thing. They reject the accuracy of such dates, based on an alternate interpretation of the available evidence. However, that isn't very satisfying, so let's address the question you really want to ask, which is "how do YECs account for such supposed ages?". The short version is that ...


7

Many Christians believe that God is in complete control of the weather, using it for blessings and curses. They don't deny that the climate is changing, but they do doubt that it is caused by humans, and more importantly they deny that people have any ability to prevent these changes from happening. There are many biblical passages about how God will bless ...


3

Life. The first point of disagreement is support for Life. The ideas of Malthus, Paul Ehrlich ("The Population Bomb", 1968) and others that humanity was about to exhaust all its resources were used to justify the denial of food aid to India in the 1960s and 70s, push for abortion and one-child policies. In this case, scientific advances led to ...


2

Are Catholics obliged to follow scientific evidence that they find disreputable with respect to the Covid-19 pandemic? The answer seems to be in the negative. But based on the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) guidelines, but the faithful are also bound by government rules and guidelines. The vaccines are a separate matter. Why? The CDF ...


2

There is absolutely nothing in the doctrine of any significant Christian group about time travel, teleportation or the "fourth dimension". Christians are therefore free to believe whatever seems correct to them about these things. There are scriptural descriptions of events that appear to be translation of people faster than is normally occurring. ...


2

St. Thomas Aquinas described the necessity of studying God's creation in his Summa contra gentiles bk. 2 (Creation) ch. 2 ("That the consideration of creatures is useful for instruction of faith"): through meditating on His works we are able somewhat to admire and consider the divine wisdom; it leads us to admire the sublime power of God, and ...


2

I think your premise may be flawed. You ask about "Christians who reject animals existing >7,000 years ago", but that implies Young Earth Creationists, who reject anything (other than God, of course) existing more than 7,000 years ago. This means that they also reject any dating of any worldly substance (at least on Earth, but that's a whole ...


1

Most Evangelical Christians are suspicious of what could be the means of centralizing world governments, and that being a contributing factor to the biblical apocalypse. Biblical history lists many empires that rose, and then became so corrupt that they needed to be destroyed. The underlying hope was that there were other nations that were untouched by the ...


1

If the creation was 'good', as observed by God, why would there have been an instability in matter such that it spontaneously decayed (radioactively) emitting harmful radiation ? Is it not more likely that radioactivity is the result of heavenly powers being relieved of their duties and subsequently being committed to 'chains' due to their rebellion against ...


1

Intellectual work of monks as a way to getting closer to God by understanding better His creation? This question reminds me of St. Benedict’s iconic expression that can be found in his Holy Rule: Ut In Omnibus Glorificetur Deus (That in all things may God be glorified - 1 Peter 4:11) As we more frequently see is his very well known motto: Ora et Labora (Work ...


1

Pope Pius IX, First Vatican Council, dogmatic constitution Dei Filius on faith & reason, canons on God the Creator of all things: Canon 5. If any one confess not that the world, and all things which are contained in it, both spiritual and material, have been, in their whole substance, produced by God out of nothing; or shall say that God created, not by ...


1

Are there any texts that mention viruses or dinosaurs or black holes or electricity or chromosomes or explain that the stars are suns etc? Science and religion are supposed to be antagonists. History tells a more complicated story. The Bible does not teach how the heavens go, but rather how to go to Heaven! That is a huge difference. To back up new ...


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