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Revelation 21:1-2 seems to indicate a revelation of things yet to come: 1 Then I saw “a new heaven and a new earth,” for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea. 2 I saw the Holy City, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride beautifully dressed for her husband. this is what ...


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I don't put much stock in numerology normally, but I think this is one of the cases where the numerological meaning of twelve, the complete people of God, is more important than trying to identify which specific individuals are being referred to, if specific individuals were ever even in the mind of the author. Consider how the Twelve Tribes of Israel is an ...


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Since the time of the Reformation, the Protestant view was that the papacy was the beast of Revelation. John Wesley declared that “This beast is the Romish Papacy, as it came to a point six hundred years since, stands now, and will for some time longer.” The only Protestant view I could find on the image of the beast that comes out of the earth is from a ...


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It is likely that the earliest identification of "the mark of the beast" in Revelation 13:17-18 was written down by Ireneaus (circa 175 A.D.) He believed it to be the name Lateinos [Greek for 'Latin']. He wrote: "It seems to me very probable; for this is a name of the last of Daniel's four kingdoms; they being Latins that now reign." ...


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It's not quite so simple, the OP argument from silence. Let's assume that the "Left Behind" folks are correct; that is, the church age ends as John is carried to heaven at Rev. 4:1. The signs thereafter then appear to be demonic. But this is not to prove that the gifts of the Spirit ceased some 2,000 years ago. They may only cease as the Spirit ...


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A problem with any question about the way the book of Revelation mentions 'miracles / signs / wonders' is the confused way many translations have translated this Greek word semeion. It is used seven times in the book of Revelation but is inconsistently translated, and continuationists may try to answer by working in ideas about miracles and wonders when they ...


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Q: What answer do continuationists have to the seven mentions of 'miracles/signs/wonders' in Revelation? Continuationists would probably respond by pointing out that the OP is making an extraordinary claim that requires extraordinary evidence (as Carl Sagan's standard suggests), and the OP's use of Revelation fails to meet that burden of proof. Argument 1: ...


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For thus saith the LORD God of Israel unto me; Take the wine cup of this fury at my hand, and cause all the nations, to whom I send thee, to drink it. And they shall drink, and be moved, and be mad, because of the sword that I will send among them. - Jeremiah 25:15-16 For the day of the LORD is near upon all the heathen: as thou hast done, it shall be done ...


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Instead, most understand Jesus's words that the holy spirit would be a 'helper' or a 'comforter' (John 15:26), rather than an inspirer. I was going to leave this in a comment, but I didn't have the points. Sorry. I think that there are hundreds if not thousands of people who truly believe they have spoken to Jesus in modern times. My father used to work in ...


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My church has a theme, "It is easy to hear God when you are in His presence ". He did an entire sermon on Hearing God leads to the supernatural. Other related sermons are Multipy:God made your calling beyond your abiity to do so, you'll need Him to do it This would require specifics from Him, because calling is specific to each person. He also ...


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Do/which Christians believe they hear from God? Speaking in very general terms, most Christians denominations accept the possibility that God can speak to various individuals in one manner or another. It happens occasionally, here and there. It is true that some seem not to be able to hear the voice of God. But then He may be speaking to us in a way we are ...


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The Catholic Church believes in the possibility of "interior locutions". Various saints are recorded as having heard the voice of God, including Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Avila, and Teresa of Calcutta. In a different way, God can speak to people via apparition. In recent times, Saint Faustina Kowalska recorded conversations with Jesus, which are ...


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The real focus here should not be on what Christians "believe", but what real spiritual people "experience". Unfortunately, as modern society has such a loose definition of what is "Christian", the real answer can only be addressed by a person who has actually "heard" from God. So as Stack Exchange has so generously ...


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Four mainstream groups within Trinitarian Protestantism are examined regarding their views of the Book of Revelation in the source I quote from below. Of course, there will be more than four ways of understanding Rev. 15:1, but this sample should serve to suffice for a short answer. (Note - all emphases in the quotes are mine.) Albert Barnes of the 19th ...


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I have, a small handful of times, perceived in my mind what presented as vocalized words from God. Whether this came in through my ears I cannot say. Prior to God saving me through Jesus Christ there were other things that I similarly "heard" but I would not assign all of these the same source. Rather than a point of pride I consider it a ...


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If you are seeking an exhaustive list of which denominations believe they hear from God, I don't think that would be possible. In my experience, those who do claim to hear from him have always been 'non-denominational'. In fact, at least 2 people I have met who claim to have been 'inspired' by God said they felt forced out of the churches they had been ...


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