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Probably the most definitive verse on this is in Luke: 36 While they were telling these things, He Himself stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be to you.” 37 But they were startled and frightened and thought that they were seeing a spirit. 38 And He said to them, “Why are you troubled, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? 39 See My hands and My ...


13

Most branches of Christianity believe that Jesus rose from the dead bodily (ie he wasn't merely a spirit at that point). The very context of the verse you are referring to, is that he was eating the fish to show he was not a ghost to his disciples: Jesus Appears to the Disciples 36 While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among them and ...


12

The body of Christ ascended with him into heaven, as was witnessed by his disciples and many others. Luke 24 (ESV): 50 Then he led them out as far as Bethany, and lifting up his hands he blessed them. 51 While he blessed them, he parted from them and was carried up into heaven. 52 And they worshiped him and returned to Jerusalem with great joy, 53 and ...


12

For mainstream Christian denominations (including Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, mainline Protestants, and Evangelicals), Resurrection is NOT the key to Jesus's identity. Rather, the resurrection shows the VICTORY of Jesus over the power of death due to His obedience to God the Father. If you read the four Gospels, the speeches in the book of Acts, and ...


10

According to The New Evidence That Demands a Verdict by Josh McDowell, p125, Josephus, who died after 100AD, wrote of Jesus in his Jewish Antiquities, "...for he appeared to them alive again the third day; as the divine prophets had foretold these and then thousand other wonderful things concerning him." (Antiquities, XVIII, 33). However, those words are ...


10

Read the whole chapter. Earlier in 1st Corinthians 15 the Bible's definitive answer to this question is given. For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared ...


10

Christians who believe in the inerrancy or infallibility of the Bible argue that these two accounts are not contradictory: that Jesus met his followers in both Jerusalem and Galilee after his resurrection. Such an argument first requires establishing that there was a lengthy period of time between the resurrection and the ascension, and that Luke 24 is a ...


10

I'm going to preface this by reminding the community that whether or not a theory is true is off-topic. What is taught is what's at hand, and also what's asked. The following is only addressing what is asked: "What reasons are given". Refrain from debates over what is more "plausible", please. Unlike skeptics, Christians are willing to believe in the ...


9

The atonement theology is a complicated one to explain. To the believers, it is a simple acceptance of one's imperfection and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ the perfect one to render us perfect in the eyes of God. To the unbelievers, it is foolishness that God would become human to die for their sins. For the message of the cross is foolishness to those ...


9

Julius Africanus was an early third century Christian historian. He says that a pagan historian named Thallus mentions the darkness that occurred during Jesus' crucifixion, and that Thallus explained it as an eclipse. However, Africanus correctly notes that an eclipse is not possible during the Jewish Passover when Jesus was crucified (see: On the ...


9

Lazarus and others died of the "first death" and were raised back to the same earthly body as before they died. Their ultimate fate was still to be determined, be it everlasting life or the "second death" on judgement day. Jesus died of the "second death" to pay the penalty of death for believers. He was raised up in full glory as a conquerer, and it is ...


8

Taylor & Francis which is in publication of scholarly information of the highest quality and publishes books in Science, Built Environment, Humanities, Social Science, Education, Health, Behavioral Science, and other professional subjects, published “International Geology Review study” authored by Jefferson B. Williamsa, Markus J. Schwabb & A. ...


8

Great question! I'm sure it was a miracle because John would not have bothered to mention the locked doors otherwise. On the evening of that first day of the week, when the disciples were together, with the doors locked for fear of the Jewish leaders, Jesus came and stood among them and said, ‘Peace be with you!’ John 20:19 So how did it happen? Jesus ...


8

Oh man this is a good question! As always, coming from a Catholic perspective: The Catechism of the Catholic Church has this to say about resurrection generally: What is "rising"? In death, the separation of the soul from the body, the human body decays and the soul goes to meet God, while awaiting its reunion with its glorified body. God, in his ...


8

Early on, the Church fought against a heresy known as Docetism. Docetism taught that Jesus only appeared to look like a man, but in reality was not. Any teaching that denied the existence of Jesus' resurrected body not functioning as a normal, human body, is thus technically heretical in Nicene formulation. For this reason, the Chalcedonian Creed states ...


8

Its hard to understand why you should think for a minute that Jesus taught anyone to follow any other god than the God of the Jewish Tanakh (ie the Old Testament). If you can add to your question to show how Jesus's teaching differs from the Tanakh then that would be helpful. As far as the Christian is concerned nothing Jesus taught contradicts the Tanakh, ...


8

Discussing "Whether Christ was the cause of His own Resurrection?" (Summa Theologica III q. 53 a. 4), St. Thomas Aquinas writes (co.): in consequence of death Christ's Godhead was not separated from His soul, nor from His flesh. Consequently, both the soul and the flesh of the dead Christ can be considered in two respects: (1) in respect of His ...


7

I once hear this story that really helped me understand Do you know why Jesus had to die? Can I tell you a story that might help make it clear? There is a story told about a particular Indian tribe who was suffering from the effects of a severe drought. Food was scarce and the members of the tribe were beginning to steal from each other in order ...


7

In a family, the firstborn son had special privileges that set Him above all others. Jesus, in ushering in the resurrection for all, had the privileges of that firstborn son. Note: For a long time, I used to think of this strictly in chronological terms - but it isn't warranted. Elijah & Elisha resurrected dead people. Lazarus and Jairus' daughter ...


7

Was Thomas a believer before seeing the resurrected Jesus? Yes and No. Faith is not a binary option - it comes in degrees, has differing objects in view, and requires testing to discern it's genuine worth. Thomas was a believer in the sense of trusting in Jesus as his master and teacher and forsaking all to follow him - this was akin to the faith of the ...


7

The comment by @curiousdannii points us in the right direction. Origins of Major religions. 1) Judaism also calls on its believer's to remember the miracles that set them free from Egypt (an event I believe happened). They were led by Moses, a literate man raised and educated by Egyptian royals. Under Moses, they survived several military attacks, and his ...


6

Hands down, Eusebius is your best bet for an "historical" (by which I assume you mean non-biblical) account of the early church. Eusebius is often called the 'Father of Church History'. Although he was not active until the 200s, his work is usually considered by historians of all types - from Dan Wallace to Bart Ehrmann to be the pre-eminent collector of "...


6

That it was "an unfortunate event, and not at all the way God for planned to things to go" is not the teaching of the Mormon Church, as Mormons believe the Atonement happened precisely the way God willed it to happen and that it was perfect beyond our comprehension. The official doctrinal stance of the LDS church on the death and resurrection of Jesus ...


6

The significance lies in that Jesus prophesied that He will rise from the dead on the third day. Jesus answered them, "Destroy this temple, and I will raise it again in three days." John 2 : 19 But the temple he had spoken of was his body. John 2 : 21 The false witnesses misquoted Jesus at His trial, not for the days but on who will destroy the '...


6

Some inferences can be drawn from scripture, particularly from 1 Corinthians 15: But Christ has indeed been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. (v14 NIV) This indicates to us that Christ's resurrection should be viewed in a different manner than previous examples of people being raised from the dead (Lazarus, Widow of ...


6

I have not read either of the books, How Jesus Became God or Misquoting Jesus, but I have read another of his books, Forged: Writing in the Name of God – Why the Bible’s Authors Are Not Who We Think They Are (HarperCollins, 2011). In Forged, Ehman condensed a lot of challenging conclusions into a single volume, but I found nothing that many other scholars ...


6

That's actually a very good question that people do not ask as often as they should. You are right that it is important to distinguish between evidence and the explanation of that evidence. With historical evidence, it is also important to qualify what we mean by historical "evidence." Many people today limit this to physical evidence like archaeological ...


5

Billy Graham told a story about a minister friend of his. This minister spoke to a Chinese man who had just emigrated to the USA. He had never heard of Jesus. The minister told him the whole story. At the end of the story, the Chinese man began to cry. "Why are you crying?" said the minister... "Because all of my life I have known HIM inside me but I ...


5

The answer is because Jesus was without sin. When Adam and Eve first sinned, not only were they thrown out of the Garden of Eden, but they were also rendered mortal; they were now capable of dying. Everyone who sins dies, and everyone sins. Even those before Jesus who died and were returned to life (like Lazarus) still had to die again later. Jesus however ...


5

There are a couple of facets to the answer. First of all, the Gospels themselves attest that the Resurrection occurred (or, at any rate, was discovered) on the “first day of the week”: Now after the Sabbath, toward the dawn of the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to see the tomb (Mt 28:1). When the Sabbath was past, Mary ...


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