37

From this discussion, if "three days and three nights" is taken idiomatically, it means 3 days as the Jewish people of the day would have understood it. Now lets take a look at Jesus time in the sepulchre: Part of Friday = one dayspan. All of Saturday = one dayspan. Part of Sunday = one dayspan. Literally three days and three nights? ...


17

The phrasing of Matthew 12:40 is an anomaly. The bulk of the New Testament testimony is that Jesus was resurrected, not after three days but on the third day: Matthew 16:21 ...and on the third day be raised. Matthew 17:32 ...and on the third day he will be raised. Luke 9:22 ...and on the third day be raised. Luke 18:33 ...and on the third ...


16

The reason Jesus said this has been the subject of debate. One common belief is that He didn't want her to tarry there, that it was more of a "now is not the time" statemen. Example: Clarke's Commentary on the Bible Touch me not - Μη μου ἁπτου, Cling not to me. Ἁπτομαι has this sense in Job 31:7, where the Septuagint use it for the Hebrew דבק ...


16

Probably the most definitive verse on this is in Luke: 36 While they were telling these things, He Himself stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be to you.” 37 But they were startled and frightened and thought that they were seeing a spirit. 38 And He said to them, “Why are you troubled, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? 39 See My ...


15

It has been well said that mankind's greatest enemy is death. Whoever would be the Savior of all mankind must then, of necessity, conquer mankind's greatest enemy. Had Jesus merely died and returned to Heaven without overcoming death, then man's greatest enemy would remain unconquered. As it is, we can ask along with the apostle Paul, "Where, O Death, is ...


13

Most branches of Christianity believe that Jesus rose from the dead bodily (ie he wasn't merely a spirit at that point). The very context of the verse you are referring to, is that he was eating the fish to show he was not a ghost to his disciples: Jesus Appears to the Disciples 36 While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among ...


12

The rule is "no", but like every rule there are exceptions. So "yes". It should be stressed that such views are not mainstream, majority or orthodox in any way. However there are groups that claim to be Christian and hold to a metaphorical view of Christ's resurrection. Likewise, there are groups who claim to be Christian but don't even believe that Christ ...


12

The body of Christ ascended with him into heaven, as was witnessed by his disciples and many others. Luke 24 (ESV): 50 Then he led them out as far as Bethany, and lifting up his hands he blessed them. 51 While he blessed them, he parted from them and was carried up into heaven. 52 And they worshiped him and returned to Jerusalem with great joy, 53 and ...


11

Old Testament prophecies are sometimes 'thematic', by 'type' or 'metaphor' as in the case of these three days. There are various places in the Old Testament that give special meaning to three days. The gospels however only refer to the prophecy of Jonah. Christ said that Jonah would be the 'sign' that God would give the Jews, as a rebuke for their obstinacy....


10

St. Thomas Aquinas addressed this pretty deeply, and as I suspected, his answer was yes, Our Lord's risen body was a glorified one. Although it differed in glory in some way from His body in Heaven. I answer that, Christ's was a glorified body in His Resurrection, and this is evident from three reasons. First of all, because His Resurrection was the ...


10

I think that Biblically the Good Friday tradition doesn't stand up to scrutiny. The traditional view tends to forget that since it was Passover there would be an additional Sabbath in the chronology. We can see a hint of this in the difference between Mark 16:1 and Luke 23:55 regarding the purchasing of spices by the women. See this website for a detailed ...


10

According to The New Evidence That Demands a Verdict by Josh McDowell, p125, Josephus, who died after 100AD, wrote of Jesus in his Jewish Antiquities, "...for he appeared to them alive again the third day; as the divine prophets had foretold these and then thousand other wonderful things concerning him." (Antiquities, XVIII, 33). However, those words are ...


10

Read the whole chapter. Earlier in 1st Corinthians 15 the Bible's definitive answer to this question is given. For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared ...


10

Christians who believe in the inerrancy or infallibility of the Bible argue that these two accounts are not contradictory: that Jesus met his followers in both Jerusalem and Galilee after his resurrection. Such an argument first requires establishing that there was a lengthy period of time between the resurrection and the ascension, and that Luke 24 is a ...


10

I'm going to preface this by reminding the community that whether or not a theory is true is off-topic. What is taught is what's at hand, and also what's asked. The following is only addressing what is asked: "What reasons are given". Refrain from debates over what is more "plausible", please. Unlike skeptics, Christians are willing to believe in the ...


10

For mainstream Christian denominations (including Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, mainline Protestants, and Evangelicals), Resurrection is NOT the key to Jesus's identity. Rather, the resurrection shows the VICTORY of Jesus over the power of death due to His obedience to God the Father. If you read the four Gospels, the speeches in the book of Acts, and ...


9

In 1 Timothy 6:20, Paul specifically exhorts Timothy Avoid the irreverent babble and contradictions of what is falsely called “knowledge,” In doing so, Paul is specifically calling on Timothy not to engage those who claim a special "Gnosis" that somehow elevates them. As such, Paul is not going to take on that heresy himself, but he does still provide ...


9

The atonement theology is a complicated one to explain. To the believers, it is a simple acceptance of one's imperfection and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ the perfect one to render us perfect in the eyes of God. To the unbelievers, it is foolishness that God would become human to die for their sins. For the message of the cross is foolishness to those ...


8

If one chooses to explain away 1 Corinthians 15:4-7 that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, 5 and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. 6 Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep. 7 Then he appeared to James, ...


8

Julius Africanus was an early third century Christian historian. He says that a pagan historian named Thallus mentions the darkness that occurred during Jesus' crucifixion, and that Thallus explained it as an eclipse. However, Africanus correctly notes that an eclipse is not possible during the Jewish Passover when Jesus was crucified (see: On the ...


8

Great question! I'm sure it was a miracle because John would not have bothered to mention the locked doors otherwise. On the evening of that first day of the week, when the disciples were together, with the doors locked for fear of the Jewish leaders, Jesus came and stood among them and said, ‘Peace be with you!’ John 20:19 So how did it happen? Jesus ...


8

Oh man this is a good question! As always, coming from a Catholic perspective: The Catechism of the Catholic Church has this to say about resurrection generally: What is "rising"? In death, the separation of the soul from the body, the human body decays and the soul goes to meet God, while awaiting its reunion with its glorified body. God, in his ...


8

Lazarus and others died of the "first death" and were raised back to the same earthly body as before they died. Their ultimate fate was still to be determined, be it everlasting life or the "second death" on judgement day. Jesus died of the "second death" to pay the penalty of death for believers. He was raised up in full glory as a conquerer, and it is ...


7

There have already been several answers here, and I don't usually post an answer to questions that have already received lots of attention, but no one here so far has touched on the central point of this doctrine: The Atonement of Jesus Christ compensates for the Fall. Genesis gives the familiar story of how God gave to Adam and Eve a commandment and a ...


7

Taylor & Francis which is in publication of scholarly information of the highest quality and publishes books in Science, Built Environment, Humanities, Social Science, Education, Health, Behavioral Science, and other professional subjects, published “International Geology Review study” authored by Jefferson B. Williamsa, Markus J. Schwabb & A. ...


7

I once hear this story that really helped me understand Do you know why Jesus had to die? Can I tell you a story that might help make it clear? There is a story told about a particular Indian tribe who was suffering from the effects of a severe drought. Food was scarce and the members of the tribe were beginning to steal from each other in order ...


7

In a family, the firstborn son had special privileges that set Him above all others. Jesus, in ushering in the resurrection for all, had the privileges of that firstborn son. Note: For a long time, I used to think of this strictly in chronological terms - but it isn't warranted. Elijah & Elisha resurrected dead people. Lazarus and Jairus' daughter ...


7

Its hard to understand why you should think for a minute that Jesus taught anyone to follow any other god than the God of the Jewish Tanakh (ie the Old Testament). If you can add to your question to show how Jesus's teaching differs from the Tanakh then that would be helpful. As far as the Christian is concerned nothing Jesus taught contradicts the Tanakh, ...


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