13

Most branches of Christianity believe that Jesus rose from the dead bodily (ie he wasn't merely a spirit at that point). The very context of the verse you are referring to, is that he was eating the fish to show he was not a ghost to his disciples: Jesus Appears to the Disciples 36 While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among them and ...


11

Question: Will Christ at the second coming be made of flesh? Answer: Yes. This is what the Bible says: It is true that “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us” (John 1:14). The Word gave up the glory he had in heaven and became a little lower than the angels in order to do the will of his Father in heaven. But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower ...


10

Man, though made of body and soul, is a unity. Through his very bodily condition he sums up in himself the elements of the material world. Through him they are thus brought to their highest perfection and can raise their voice in praise freely given to the Creator. For this reason man may not despise his bodily life. Rather he is obliged to regard ...


8

Early on, the Church fought against a heresy known as Docetism. Docetism taught that Jesus only appeared to look like a man, but in reality was not. Any teaching that denied the existence of Jesus' resurrected body not functioning as a normal, human body, is thus technically heretical in Nicene formulation. For this reason, the Chalcedonian Creed states ...


8

Oh man this is a good question! As always, coming from a Catholic perspective: The Catechism of the Catholic Church has this to say about resurrection generally: What is "rising"? In death, the separation of the soul from the body, the human body decays and the soul goes to meet God, while awaiting its reunion with its glorified body. God, in his ...


8

The phrase is a direct quotation from Genesis 2.7. There is some difference in the wording in most modern bibles. This is because Paul was quoting from the Greek text of the Old Testament, known as the Septuagint or LXX, whereas our modern bibles are translated from the Hebrew text from which the Greek was originally translated. The LXX text of Genesis 2.7: ...


7

Both "Pulpit Commentary" and "Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible" recognize this quote as taken from Genesis 2:7, not word by word but carrying the same meaning. Then the LORD God formed the man from the dust of the ground. He breathed the breath of life into the man's nostrils, and the man became a living person. (Genesis 2:7, NLT) The "Last Adam"...


5

The Catechism has this: 1026 By his death and Resurrection, Jesus Christ has "opened" heaven to us. The life of the blessed consists in the full and perfect possession of the fruits of the redemption accomplished by Christ. He makes partners in his heavenly glorification those who have believed in him and remained faithful to his will. Heaven is ...


5

We won't know until the afterlife; the answer looks to be "no1" The Fourth Lateran Council rules lean toward "no", as explained by Father Paul A Deffner, O.P. THE SAME BODY Not only will our body be brought back to be reunited with the soul, but it will be the same body to which the soul was united before death. As St. Paul declared (I Cor. ...


4

The Sadducees did not believe in the resurrection of the dead, the question was simply a set up. Even though they did not believe in this, the resurrection they are referring to is the resurrection of dead the Pharisees believe in, which according to Act 23 is similar to what Paul (Christians) believes in. 6 But when Paul perceived that the one part were ...


4

There are two different things going in those passages in Luke Those two narratives aren't necessarily pointing toward what happens in Heaven, as there are varying interpretations to what is meant by the arrival of the Kingdom of God. Since you asked for a Catholic viewpoint, and this topic comes up a lot during the RCIA ministry, here's an explanation ...


4

The idea of permanent incarnation has been most famously expressed in the Council of Chalcedon, long before the Reformation – there Christ's natures are said to exist "indivisibly, inseperably." Reformers like Luther and Calvin upheld the Chalcedonian definition, and this can be seen in their writings. For example, here's a brief quote from Calvin:...


4

There's no authenticating body for evangelicalism, so who could stop an "evangelical" church preaching heresy if that's what they decided they wanted to do? But to teach an immaterial resurrection does go against the clear teaching of the Bible and many other statements of historic Christian, Protestant, Reformed, and evangelical teaching: Luke 24:...


4

Will Christ at the second coming be made of flesh? According to most Christian denominations the answer is yes. I assume that you are questioning whether Christ will appear at the Second Coming according to the flesh? To start of with, at the resurrection of Jesus, he rose from the dead, in body and soul! On one occasion, St. Thomas actually put his finger ...


3

The scriptures tell us that in the resurrection we will be "changed" to be "like the angels" with spiritual bodies that are imperishable and powerful: Luke 20:34-36 NIV 34 Jesus replied, “The people of this age marry and are given in marriage. 35 But those who are considered worthy of taking part in the age to come and in the resurrection from the dead ...


3

Dispensationalists believe that in the secret rapture, believers will receive their new, glorified bodies. This rapture occurs prior to or during the tribulation, meaning that the current earth will continue, and only later will the new earth be made. Glorified bodies Dispensationalist John MacArthur, while discussing 1 Thessalonians 4:16–17 and what he ...


3

Like God, we humans are spiritual beings. Unlike God, we are not just spirit; we are physical, corporeal bodies which are animated by spirit. Imagine, if you will, a living body. Picture this body standing upright, but perfectly still. Every system in the body is functioning as it should: the heart is beating at 72 times a minute; the oxygen-carbon-dioxide ...


3

Jehovah's Witnesses are among those who take a different view of the "body or bodies" that Jesus appeared to his followers in after his resurrection. Below is quoted from jw.org: After Jesus’ Resurrection, Was His Body Flesh or Spirit? The Bible's answer The Bible says that Jesus “was put to death in the flesh but made alive [resurrected] in the ...


3

V.Rollins is right. Read the verse in it's entirety it is talking about corruption vs. incorruption: " 50 Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption." Symbolism changes throughout the bible from one verse to another. In one instance "blood" is referring to mortality, ...


3

Man in his present state is mortal, and corruptable and cannot enter the kingdom of God. 1 Corinthians 15;53 For this corruptable must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. Philippians 3;21 Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body, according ...


3

CAVEAT: I am not familiar with whatever differences might exist between the Chalcedonian Creed's perspective on Christ's humanity and the CJCLDS's perspective on the same. I'll let my answer stand, however, if only to provide a traditional Protestant (and perhaps Roman Catholic?) perspective in the matter. If I have failed the questioner by not comparing and ...


3

In line with the answer of @KorvinStarmast, early and medieval Christian theologians generally believed that that people in Heaven would not need to eat. Here is what Origen said in the third century: Hence it happens that some people of the simpler sort cannot distinguish or discriminate between things that the divine Scriptures assign to the interior ...


3

A question from readers in a Watchtower magazine addresses this subject very well. It approaches this seeming conflict by examining the original language of the verses and what the literal original meaning would have been. Your question may be a duplicate of one already asked here on CSE. However below is an answer that I found plausible: Why did the ...


3

The permanent and eternal union of Divine nature and human nature in Jesus Christ is clearly stated by Martin Luther (in XXX111 articles) in his 'disputation' : On the Divinity and Humanity of Christ Wikipedia I would not wish to merely transpose text en masse from that document as I think it speaks for itself. But in answer to the comment, I would ...


3

Does the Catholic Church hold that the embodied state after the final judgment is better than heaven before being embodied, or from an individual perspective is there really no difference qualitatively in the two states? The short answer is: YES, embodied state is better, and we will definitely notice the difference qualitatively! The Doctrine of the ...


2

Although I am only able to answer for my Church as a Baptist we believe that the resurrection means that Jesus Body reclaimed life just as it was when he was crucified. And that belief we base on several Scriptures such as: Luk 24:38 through 43 KJV And he said unto them, Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold my ...


2

The issue is the use of the words substance and substantial, and applying a modern meaning to them. The Catechism of the Catholic Church, following the doctrine expounded at the Council of Trent, says 1376 The Council of Trent summarizes the Catholic faith by declaring: "Because Christ our Redeemer said that it was truly his body that he was offering ...


2

Scripture speaks of the likeness of Adam and the likeness of Christ, making some distinction between them: “And just as we have borne the likeness of the earthly man, so shall we bear the likeness of the man from heaven” (1 Corinthians 15:49). Christ will remain a man, but his deity that was once veiled in his humanity will shine through it. Because of the ...


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