21

The general belief, that I think applies to most Christians, is that Jesus' death and resurrection opens the gates of heaven, saving us from sin in general, but that we must still choose to actually enter through the gate -- to repent of our individual sins and desire to sin no more. To put it another way, Jesus' death makes repentance and forgiveness ...


12

If a person should be aware that God forgives sins and should yet purpose to live a sinful life, then (whatever they theorise about an unknowable future) they are already in danger of perdition, of destruction and of eternal hell-fire, for the following reasons : 1. Because it is hard-hearted To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts, [...


9

There is an example in scripture, spoken by Jesus, of the prayer of a sinner : And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be ...


8

There are two primary ways that sola fide theologians deal with this issue, and there is ongoing debate between them over it (cf. Lordship salvation controversy). I'll first address the historical view (sometimes called "Lordship salvation") and the more recent view, called "free grace theology." Lordship salvation The name commonly ...


8

Satan and all the fallen angels (demons) are completely consumed with evil and chose to do evil with all their intellect and sin against God, thus repentance is no longer possible for them. According to Canon 1 of the VI Lateran Council in 1215, the fallen angels were good. Does any goodness still exist within these demons and can they repent since God is ...


8

Although it is true that Christians believe salvation comes through faith in Jesus Christ, it is not true that Christians believe they are under the Mosaic Law. Jesus came to fulfil the Law and has introduced a new covenant. The new covenant frees us from an obligation to keep the hundreds of laws that were given to Israel. The new covenant is not a ...


7

If a man is ordained, he is unable to validly marry in the Church: Those in sacred orders invalidly attempt marriage. (Code of Canon Law, canon 1087) But he is not (as AthanasiusOfAlex points out) excommunicated by that fact. He is suspended from carrying out his priestly office: A cleric who attempts marriage, even if only civilly, incurs a latae ...


7

To understand the Reformed approach to this challenging question, we should begin with the concept of the "wills" of God. Reformed theologians typically refer to the relevant ones as the decretive (or "secret") and preceptive (or "revealed") wills of God, which R. C. Sproul defines as follows: Decretive will: The sovereign, ...


6

"Should they get re-baptized"s off-topic - it's opinion-based. However, here's a sample of what some teach and practice. In various Churches that I've attended, including Baptist, Evangelical Free, and local community non-denominational Bible Churches, getting baptized again is fairly common. This is based on the belief that Baptism doesn't save us, but ...


6

Can someone be saved if they willingly live in sin? Since God forgives sins, why not live a sinful life? Then when I'm dying in my bed, I'll just ask him to forgive me for my sins. Can such a one be saved? The answer is yes. Whoever calls upon the name of the Lord shall be saved and there is no scriptural evidence to suggest that one must clean up their ...


5

Short answer: For the general case, no. Your question asks about both the general case, and an outlier case of suicide. That series of articles in the Catechism addresses in part whether or not the disordered act of suicide is with full consent of the will, or is not with full consent of the will. If it is not then it may not meet the gravity of mortal ...


5

As you've said, being saved is a process more than an event. You can think of repentance as a continual process or something you do over and over again. The definition becomes blurry when you consider something you do over and over again as a process. Sometimes we look at repentance within the scope of a particular sin, and once we stop doing that thing, it ...


5

Repentance = Changing Repentance (μετανοεο 3340, a la Acts 2:38) involves a change of mind and heart. There's an implicit sincerity of heart when you do it. One cannot "plan on repenting later" because that's not what repentance is. It involves a rejection of the old way because you know it's wrong. It doesn't mean that one never commits a sin that has ...


5

What has become known as “The Sinner’s Prayer” in Protestant circles is a comparatively new phenomenon. In some groups non-members who listen to preaching are urged to "say the sinner's prayer" and accept Jesus as Lord and Saviour - then that person is told they are now saved from their sins. Many have thought that because they repeated 'the sinner's prayer'...


4

There are similar discourses elsewhere in the Book of Mormon, notably in 2 Nephi 2 and 2 Nephi 9. Especially in 2 Nephi 9:6-8 it is explained that without the atonement of Christ, the judgement that came on Adam would have been eternal and unending, but not why that is a precondition for repentance. 2 Nephi 9:6-8 6 For as death hath passed upon all men, ...


4

Another explanation, coming from the Reformed tradition, is this: Christ died only for His people, not for all people. Various passages that support this are Matthew 1:21, John 10:7-18, John 17, and Romans 8:30. The idea here is that Christ's death does not make justification possible for His people - it actually effects justification for His people. And, ...


4

The reformed view would believe both those types of verses you have quoted but would add a third type to ensure the whole picture in presented: "For many are called, but few are chosen." (ESV Matt 22:14) So what we have are three things: God offers the gospel to all Only some respond Those who do respond are 'the elect' God is sovereign in his ...


4

There are several possibilities: And he did not do many miracles there because of their lack of faith. (Matthew 13:58) It is not in God's nature to forcefully 'prove himself' to the cynic. Jesus may have simply been indicating that had Tyre and Sidon been anticipating the Messiah, they would have received Jesus better than the very people God had ...


4

There are a number of issues discussed in this post. Excommunication is not incurred for attempted but invalid marriage First of all, a priest who attempts to marry does not incur a latae sententiae (automatic) excommunication. Canon Law gives a very precise list of which crimes incur this penalty, and attempted marriage is not one of them. On the other ...


4

The Holy Ghost will give direction It's hard to prove a negative, but the reference books for missionaries are preach my gospel and the missionary handbook, neither of which seem to define the term. Therefore, in an edge case, the missionaries probably would not know what to do. By default, they would therefore pray about it (most likely in their hearts if ...


4

There is no biblical evidence to support any suggestion that the repentant criminal on the cross had ever been baptised, or not. The Bible doesn’t say. However, the fact that he knew about Jesus coming into his Kingdom may suggest he was thinking of the resurrection at the end of the time, when Jesus would be raised up and vindicated by God. The Pharisees ...


3

Short Answer: in Roman Catholic belief the dual meaning of repentance is retained from its original sense in the Old Testament. In Biblical Hebrew, the idea of repentance is represented by two verbs: שוב shuv (to return) and נחם nacham (to feel sorrow). In the New Testament, the word translated as 'repentance' is the Greek word μετάνοια (metanoia) ....


3

D&C 19 has a really interesting explanation of the meaning of eternal that may also apply to its usage in Alma: 4 And surely every man must repent or suffer, for I, God, am endless. 5 Wherefore, I revoke not the judgments which I shall pass, but woes shall go forth, weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth, yea, to those who are found on my left hand. 6 ...


3

Although Jesus died for the sins of "the whole world" (1 John 2:2), the whole world does not get the benefits of His death unless it follows the condition, specifically, acknowledging their need of forgiveness of sins from God. With this statement of faith, that I have sinned against God and I need forgiveness from God through Jesus Christ, I am saved from ...


3

It is important to understand the difference between sin and sins. We have sin, and we are sinful. We also commit sins. Our state of being sinful results in us being under a just condemnation in the sight of God. God, however, removes this condemnation and the penalty of our sign through our faith in Jesus. Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but ...


3

The short answer is yes. But it is not as simple as that either. From a Catholic view point I am going to let Fr. Gabriele Amorth,the head exorcist for the Diocese of Rome answer your question. Other denominations will see things somewhat differently. Fr. Gabriele Amorth in his in his book An Exorcist Tells His Story (1999) gives a Catholic viewpoint of ...


3

Misionaries are not bishops D&C 77:104 declares that Bishops are judges. They have the keys to help people through the process of repentance. While there are specific rules concerning repentance for really bad sins (like murder), generally speaking there is no lengthy chart that explains which sins demand a bishop and which do not. We do have some ...


3

Yes, Peter did repent, which Jesus calls "turning back" (from his betrayal): Luke 22:31-32 (DRB) And the Lord said: Simon, Simon, behold Satan hath desired to have you [plural], that he may sift you as wheat: But I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and thou, being once converted, confirm thy brethren. The Greek ποτε επιστρεψας (here ...


3

From the limited quote and from the assumption that the article's author is Reformed, probably the author was emphasizing the election part. I found the magazine's website but Vol 15 Issue 2 is not online yet and even if it is, access is to subscribers only. In Reformed ordo salutis (see also comparison of schemes in wikipedia article) Election comes first,...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible