11

There is nothing absolutely specific in the Westminster Confession about Roman Catholic baptism. What there is supports its validity. However there was a long-established acceptance of baptism by Roman Catholic priests, even more than by laymen or even women, and the Westminster Confession says nothing against it. Perhaps more significantly, actions speak ...


6

Just because a person is a long time church member does not mean they belong to Christ Jesus or that they have put their faith and trust in Him. There are many people who say they are Christians but who have never experienced the new birth. Forgetting about Calvin for one moment, born-again Christians look to Christ Jesus and believe in this promise in ...


5

Monstrous surely is the madness of the human mind, that it is more disposed to charge God with unrighteousness than to blame itself for blindness. Before answering positively, allow me to object to the scripture you cited as an argument to the contrary. The passage 1 Corinthians 10:13, cannot be interpreted to mean that God only commands men that which they ...


5

The Calvinistic position, traditionally, is not that the Son is (as stated in the question) 'begotten of the Father before all ages', but, rather, that the Son is : eternally begotten of the Father. A very informative article by Benjamin W. Swinburnson states it thus : This doctrine, as classically defined in Reformed theology, states that God the ...


5

The sin nature is an aspect of the doctrine of "original sin," but not the entire story. Louis Berkhof's highly regarded Systematic Theology introduces the topic of Original Sin by calling it simply "the sinful state and condition in which men are born." The Westminster Larger Catechism, answer 25, identifies three key components of original sin: The ...


5

I am answering the question : "Are there any reformed persons who argue for such a position" that is to say who "reject sensus unum and yet still affirm biblical inerrancy from a view of sensus plenior" ? I define sensus unum as the concept that any biblical text has a plain meaning, an obvious meaning and a single meaning. I define sensus plenior as ...


5

The first part of this answer comes from Calvin's Commentaries on 2 Peter 1:1-4. Before we can address verse 4 we need to deal with the first three verses to put everything into context: Simon Peter, a servant and an apostle of Jesus Christ, to them that have obtained like precious faith with us through the righteousness of God and our Saviour Jesus ...


5

All that God has made, expresses himself. The creation of luminaries in the heavens expresses something about Light. And God is Light; and in him is no darkness at all. The creation of vegetation, the creation of animal life, expresses something about life itself. And all life is of God and from God. I would not understand and appreciate what 'the Lion of ...


4

Colossians 1:24-27: 24 Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I am filling up what is lacking in Christ's afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church, 25 of which I became a minister according to the stewardship from God that was given to me for you, to make the word of God fully known, 26 the mystery hidden ...


4

The Catechism of the Catholic Church deals with this subject in §385–412. A couple sections in particular reveal several significant contrasts between Catholic and Reformed theology: §405: Although it is proper to each individual, original sin does not have the character of a personal fault in any of Adam's descendants. It is a deprivation of original ...


4

The majority position in Reformed theology is that man has two substantial natures – a material body and an immaterial soul – and that the words "soul" and "spirit" are best understood as both referring to the immaterial soul. Berkhof (Systematic Theology, 2.1.2) summarizes the biblical evidence this way: Trichotomists seek support in the fact that the ...


3

Why does God approve of Abel as righteous because of his offering? You stated this in point 5 of your question, and though it wasn’t explicitly asked, I wanted to address it because it is contrary to our first principles. Conversely, God approves of Abel’s offering because of his righteousness- a righteousness, like all godly righteousness, that comes to ...


3

I am a Calvinist and I will try to answer this difficult but explainable question in my thoughts and belief in scripture. Until we can see man's total depravity and God's total sovereignty we will never be able to understand God's just means so please bear with me. Few really believe in the complete ruin and total depravity of man. Those who speak of ...


3

There are two common approaches to dealing with this challenge. I'll quote from Calvinists Robert Reymond for the first, and Charles Hodge for the second. That "ruin" (apollymi) here does not mean being ultimately lost That the conditional language is a warning that God uses as a means to secure his promise of protecting the elect Contextual meaning of ...


3

The answer to Paul's question : Shall the weak brother perish ? (I Corinthians 8:11 - KJV - απολειται ο ασθενων αδελφος) is ... no he shall not perish. The reason that the weak brother will not perish is : ... for whom Christ died. (I Corinthians 8:11 - KJV - δι ον χριστος απεθανεν) The brother will not perish (or 'be destroyed') because Christ died ...


3

John Calvin makes it clear in his commentary on the book of Job : For after that Job hath been reported to have been sound, it is also said of him, that he was upright. This uprightness is meant of the life he led, which is as it were the fruit of the said root, which the Holy Ghost had planted afore. Job then had an upright and sound heart. For his ...


3

I believe the answer is self-explanatory in the first sentence of the answer to 109: "The sins forbidden in the second commandment are, all devising, counseling, commanding, using, and any wise approving, any religious worship not instituted by God himself..." Since the Lord's supper and the bread and wine are instituted by Christ Himself, we can conclude ...


3

The concept of contributing willingness to be saved as opposed to receiving willingness to be saved is a new one to me, and I have been unable to find any specific reference to that. However, within reformed Protestant theology, there is a doctrine of Irresistible or Efficacious Grace that points to the office and work of the Holy Spirit in salvation. The ...


3

It is true that the Jews ultimately did not accept the apocryphal books you listed in their canon, in a gradual process over several centuries at least spanning 1st century BC and 1st century AD. There was no definitive answer, but a lot of pointers showing the development, shown in the BIBLE CANON article of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia. Especially after ...


3

A few verses come to mind: Some are “objects of his wrath - prepared for destruction” (Rom 9:22) God “hardens whom he wants” (Rom 9:18) No one comes to Christ “unless the Father … draws them” (John 6:44) This contrasts with God “wants all people to be saved” (1 Tim 2:4) God gave his son, so that “whoever believes” will not perish (John ...


3

John Piper comments on the passage here: https://www.desiringgod.org/messages/do-not-harden-your-heart-in-the-day-of-trouble He contends that the "if" clause means something other than what you might think at first. Instead of holding your assurance (persevering in faith) until the end to become a partaker in Christ, you prove that you already are a ...


2

Dr. Leighton Flowers (a former 5-Point Calvinist) speaks about this often. Check out his writings and podcasts if you're interested in more information or to hear from former Calvinists. He and his guests often speak about pre/post views on Romans 9, Ephesians 1, and John 6. I've included an example of his prior/post interpretations of Matthew 22:1-14. ...


2

"I was afraid of the men and so I gave in to them." Saul blames the men, trying to minimize his responsibility. This is like Eve, who blamed the serpent, and Adam, who blamed "The woman you put here with me", which means that he blamed both Eve and God. Fools mock at making amends for sin, but goodwill is found among the upright. (Proverbs 14:9) Does King ...


2

God's preceptive will or revealed will is made known in His word, but His decretive will or secret will is His own hidden counsel. When we speak of God's revealed will, this defines OUR duty and our standard responsibilities. The reason we should do or take certain courses in our lives is because God has revealed His will for us in His word. But suppose ...


2

From Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calvinism#God): Traditionally, Reformed theologians have also followed the medieval tradition going back to before the early church councils of Nicaea and Chalcedon on the doctrine of the Trinity. God is affirmed to be one God in three persons: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The Son (Christ) is held to be ...


2

It would seem that "total depravity" along with predestination is what defines Calvinism but I submit that all five points of Calvinism go hand in hand. Reformed theology emphasizes the doctrine of grace, best known by the acronym TULIP ,although this really doesn't correspond to the best possible names of the five doctrines. Since "total depravity" is ...


2

I found a compilation of John Calvin quotes on the topic of God's love. Here is one that struck me as relevant to your question: Sermon #28, Deut. 4.36-38, p. 167, this quote was compiled by Andrew Myers. It is true that Saint John says generally, that [God] loved the world. And why? For Jesus Christ offers Himself generally to all men without ...


2

Original sin is Adam’s sin of disobedience against God. The sin nature is what all humans have inherited from Adam. The Calvinistic view of sin is that Adam’s sin has resulted not only in our having a sin nature, but also in our incurring guilt before God for which we deserve punishment. Being conceived with original sin upon us (Psalm 51:5) results in ...


2

In a very vague sense in many 19th and 20th century Christian writings when someone talks about "Cartesian" they mean they just mean whatever can be boiled down to the maxim: I think therefore I am And like evolution, people get the impression that reading that line gives them all they need to know about Principia philosophiae the same way "Survival of ...


2

Before you ask what Calvin thought, it might be a good idea to ask, "What did Job think?" Job 9:2 Yes, I know what you’ve said is true, but how can a person be justified before God? Job had no illusion that his life, his righteous words and deeds, were capable of rendering him justified before God. If he had confidence that his actions could effect ...


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