14

In asking this question, you have added a layer of interpretation onto the text that I do not see there. You introduce the word "want" which does not exist in the text. In fact I don't see any indication in the text that Paul has a desire for personal vengeance or that he wants Alaxander to get what's coming to him. In fact is is quite likely based on what ...


14

Sin has consequences! "Sin has two consequences, or punishments (CCC 1472). The first is eternal punishment, in which the soul loses heaven and is confined to an eternity in hell. This punishment is remitted through the forgiveness of sins. The second is temporal punishment, in which a person must expiate, or make reparation for his sins. This temporal ...


11

There are many different Christian perspectives and some may disagree, but it's arguable that at least a majority of Christians would agree that: A Christian should respond as Jesus would and according to what He taught: 38 “You have heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’ 39 But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone ...


11

First, the term "children" is a poor translation in the KJV. It's better rendered "youths" (as in the NKJV), which really changes the meaning of the story. Imagine being accosted by more than 40 teens at once, intent on making trouble for you, outside of town. This was no simple mocking; Elisha's life could very well have been in danger, and there's no ...


9

The Bible does not anywhere indicate that the ‘most’ evil people are killed directly by God. God rather often, according to the purposes of his will, postpones the eternal judgment for sin a long while. Even the very worst of criminals may live long and prosperous lives and we must not expect full justice in this world. The injustice in the world is part ...


7

A better wording would be "Did Paul want God to repay Alexander the metalworker". For all we know, Paul is merely stating a fact that God will repay ("vengeance is mine, I will repay says The Lord") Alexander - but that repayment may or may not be "bad" ... it could just as easily be that Paul is leaving it up to God, and God may choose to save him. ...


7

Reformed theologians who hold to penal substitutionary atonement emphasize a) the divine nature of Christ and the increased capacity for suffering that that implies and b) the intensity of God's wrath against him. Louis Berkhof, in his Systematic Theology (3.2.1.B), writes: [Christ's] capacity for suffering was commensurate with the ideal character of His ...


6

Disease in general Most scholars and Biblical commentaries agree that it was a common belief among the Jewish people of Jesus' day that leprosy and sickness in general was caused by sin. In the Old Testament, there are a number of passage that say doctors are of little value: As for you, you whitewash with lies; worthless physicians are you all. (Job 13:4, ...


6

Before continuing, it should be noted that this topic is discussed among theologians, but there is no official teaching which all Catholics are bound to. That's true for most questions which begin with "Why doesn't God just?" This is especially true in a specific case. Your question is one of theodicy. It can be made briefer with "Why do good things happen ...


6

It's Exodus 22. There's nothing specifically about bread, but it covers theft and double restoration. Exodus 22:4 (KJV): If the theft be certainly found in his hand alive, whether it be ox, or ass, or sheep; he shall restore double. Exodus 22:7 (KJV): If a man shall deliver unto his neighbour money or stuff to keep, and it be stolen out of the man's ...


5

Perhaps the first failure in the churches was that of hypocrisy (Acts 5:1-11). Hypocrisy is a matter of pretending to be somebody in order to get a name that they may have vainglory. It could be ambition was the seed of the failures in the churches. Ananias and his wife Sapphira was probably seeking a position. They wanted to be somebody and to have a name ...


5

For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth. Hebrews 12:6 (KJV) As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent. Revelation 3:19 The parable of the talents: And that servant, which knew his lord’s will, and prepared not himself, neither did according to his will, shall be beaten with many ...


5

The following answer shall be largely influenced by my Roman Catholic faith, so be aware of such a fact while reading. With that said, here we gooooooooo!!! Penal Substitution And Its Failures The problem with the penal substitution theory is that it confuses many points that need distinction in order to understand the nature of Christ's sacrifice. For ...


5

To my knowledge, there is no verse in the Bible that speaks specifically of a person who steals bread having to pay double. However, it is good to keep in mind that the Hebrew word for "bread" (לֶחֶם) is commonly used to mean "food" in general. With that in mind, in addition to the verses from Exodus quoted in Rob K's answer, which deal with double ...


5

The simple answer is that God has decided that the wages of sin is death. It is entirely up to God as to what punishment sin deserves, and the punishment God chose was eternal damnation. The Heidelberg Catechism's first section on Sin and Misery speaks about this, in particular question and answer 10: Q. Does God permit such disobedience and rebellion ...


4

There are similar discourses elsewhere in the Book of Mormon, notably in 2 Nephi 2 and 2 Nephi 9. Especially in 2 Nephi 9:6-8 it is explained that without the atonement of Christ, the judgement that came on Adam would have been eternal and unending, but not why that is a precondition for repentance. 2 Nephi 9:6-8 6 For as death hath passed upon all men, ...


4

Division of human beings into distinct entities called body and soul is not original biblical (nor generally Semitic) thought but is usually attributed to Greek (and other pagan) philosophies. This is not to say that this division is necessarily false, but there are two points worth mentioning: The Old Testament generally relies on the Hebrew belief that ...


4

I believe you are asking two questions. I'll answer the one in the heading first: Does God punish people for their ancestors' sins or not? Yes, in the Christian traditions (majority of the denominations) God absolutely does "punish" the children of those who committed sin - else there would be no original sin. 1 Corinthians 15:22 KJV For as in Adam ...


4

is there a reason to believe that An existence in hell will be appreciably different in quality for each individual? Revelation 20:12 And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God; and the books were opened: and another book was opened, which is the book of life: and the dead were judged out of those things which were written in the books, ...


4

The key to the answer to your question is in verses; Acts 5:3 and 4 But Peter said, "Ananias, why has Satan filled your heart to lie to the Holy Spirit and keep back part of the price of the land for yourself? 4 While it remained, was it not your own? And after it was sold, was it not in your own control? Why have you conceived this thing in your heart? ...


4

This answer is given from the perspective of the "Swedenborgian" or "New Church" denominations that accept the Christian theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772). Swedenborg rejected penal substitution as completely false and contrary to the plain teachings of the Bible. The primary question is: How do opponents of Penal Substitution explain God's ...


4

Yes, baptism removes all punishment for sin. If a person died immediately after baptism they would enter heaven directly without a need for purification in purgatory. They would not be required to do penance. From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: 1263 By Baptism all sins are forgiven, original sin and all personal sins, as well as all punishment ...


4

It seems to me that you can get people who are really rotten but, since they believe all the requisite things, go to Heaven. Yep, although it's not really about intellectual belief/assent, but that the person trusts God to fulfil all his promises and lives as though they do trust God, i.e., repentance. These really rotten people are in fact every single ...


3

Acts 5:3-4 state, "Then Peter said, 'Ananias, how is it that Satan has so filled your heart that you have lied to the Holy Spirit and have kept for yourself some of the money you received for the land? Didn’t it belong to you before it was sold? And after it was sold, wasn’t the money at your disposal? What made you think of doing such a thing? You have not ...


3

This story is a reminder "God isn't mocked" (Galatians 6:7) and sin is sin. The problem isn't that they hold money for themselves, that would have been ok. Instead, their attempt to make themselves appear better misinterpreting the selling price when reporting to church was a lie to God. That's why they are guilty of dishonesty and deceit and we all know "...


3

The Bible is only a partial map of God's whole creation (universe) in that The Bible provides us with very little information about other worlds/realms and other creations and occasionally shows us that other creations are able to move into this world but not vice versa. Yet The Bible is sufficient for us and this world. So at best we can only speculate/...


3

D&C 19 has a really interesting explanation of the meaning of eternal that may also apply to its usage in Alma: 4 And surely every man must repent or suffer, for I, God, am endless. 5 Wherefore, I revoke not the judgments which I shall pass, but woes shall go forth, weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth, yea, to those who are found on my left hand. 6 ...


2

There are no other instances in the Bible of becoming turned into a pillar of salt. Regarding the meaning of salt there does not seem to be a symbolic correlation of 'salt' with the judgment that lot's wife suffered. In fact salt generally means to preserve, like an antibiotic due to its pure composition and ability for preserving meat from rotting. I ...


2

Perhaps Paul is saying that "God will repay him" meaning.....let God handle it. He warns them that he strongly opposed the message so they could not be harmed. Maybe one of the disciples was saying "let me at him" and Paul is saying "God will handle it.....don't try to handle it because of what he did to me." I remember once a girl stole my money at school ...


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