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11

Roger Ellsworth in "Opening Up the Psalms" says not to pronounce the word: The word ‘Selah’ appears seventy-four times in forty psalms. This word signifies a pause or interlude. It may have been used to inform musicians to change instruments or to call for both musicians and listeners to ponder the truth that had been sung. In the public reading ...


10

To bless is related to to consecrate. Both imply an act of recognizing and/or declaring and devoting something to have a particular purpose or holiness. If a father blesses his son's decision in a matter, we mean that the father supports and acknowledges the decision. If a priest blesses a marriage, he declares, with the approval of the whole Church in the ...


7

There is a difference in numbering between the Hebrew (Masoretic) text and the Greek and Latin (Septuagint and Vulgate). Psalms 9 and 10 in the Hebrew get combined into one as do Ps 114 & 115. Psalms 116 and 147 both get split in two. Most Protestant Bibles follow the Hebrew numbering while most Catholic and Orthodox ones follow the Greek. I suspect ...


7

Imprecatory Psalms John Wesley escised 34 Psalms altogether, and removed portions of another 58. To imprecate means to invoke evil upon, or curse. Imprecatory psalms, also called the cursing psalms, are those psalms that contain prayers for God's judgment on the psalmist's enemies. Examples: "Let death take my enemies by surprise; let them go down ...


7

St. Thomas Aquinas writes in his introduction to his Commentary on Psalms 1-54*: The material [of the Psalms] is universal, for while the particular books of the Canon of Scripture contain special materials, this book has the general material of theology as a whole.…the work of God is fourfold; namely, that of creation, …; governance, …; reparation, …; ...


6

Paul's Greek was ψαλμοις, υμνοις and ωδαις πνευματικαις. Thayer's Greek Lexicon (via Blue Letter Bible) has ύμνος, -ου, ο, in Greek writing from Homer down, a song in praise of gods, heroes, conquerors, [cf. Trench as below, p297], but in the Scriptures of God; a sacred song, hymn. Thayer quotes Richard Chevinix Trench's Synonyms of the New Testament: ...


6

The following is a list of omitted verses and Chapters from the four week plaster, currently in use. It follows modern numbering. Not Septuagint numbering. Psalms Omitted Completely: Psalm 58 Psalm 83 Psalm 109 Verses Omitted from Particular Psalms: Psalm 5: 11 Psalm 21: 9-13 Psalm 28: 4-5 Psalm 31: 18-19 Psalm 40: 15-16 Psalm 54: 7 Psalm 55: 16 Psalm 56:...


6

TL; DR - essentially, it is a method of praising God and bringing him glory. This article addresses the very issue: There are two main things that we do when we bless the Lord. The first is synonymous with giving thanks and praise. Some translations actually say, “Give thanks to the Lord,” where others say, “Bless the Lord.” So, blessing the Lord is ...


6

While mortal sins require knowledge venial sins do not. One commits venial sin when, in a less serious matter, he does not observe the standard prescribed by the moral law, or when he disobeys the moral law in a grave matter, but without full knowledge or without complete consent. CCC #1862 Also, as Christians we should desire to do the right thing and ...


6

To add to DJClayworth's excellent answer on the history of English translation, there has been a consistent and strong push to translate the Bible (especially the New Testament) into the vernacular see the very early days of Christianity. Below is a brief outline of the history of translation during the first millennium (minus English, which has already ...


5

Let's take English (and it's predecessors) as representative. Wikipedia has all your information on the existence of Bible translations into English.. Some select quotes: Toward the end of the 7th century, the Venerable Bede began a translation of scripture into Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon). Aldhelm (c. 639–709) translated the complete Book of ...


4

Reformed theology includes covenant theology, whereby the nation of Israel is understood to be the church of the Old Testament. In this light, there is no distinction between an Israelite Psalm and a Christian Psalm; they are one and the same. Not only this, but the Reformers consistently sang almost only the 150 Psalms from the Book of Psalms (as well as ...


4

I've been going to a Protestant Presbyterian church for 20 years now, with the metrical Scottish Psalter (led by a presentor) the only source of our musical worship up until 2010. It used the 1650 version approved by the Church of Scotland. I can only answer with regard to my particular denomination. Other Protestant Presbyterian groups may have other ...


4

Introduction: Let’s start with a brief overview to establish who’s who from the LDS point of view: Latter-day Saints commonly refer to God the Eternal Father as Elohim, a Hebrew plural meaning God or gods, and to his Son Jesus Christ, as Jehovah. The first spirit son of Elohim (Heavenly Father) and his wife (Heavenly Mother) is called Jehovah. Jehovah came ...


3

The psalm prayer consists of optional prayers that may be said after each psalm. The General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours describes them as follows: 112. Psalm-prayers for each psalm are given in the supplement to the Liturgy of the Hours, to help in understanding them in a predominantly Christian way. They may be used in the ancient ...


3

The Lord is blessed in His very being as part of His condition or state of being (along with timeless, omnipotent, omniscient, good, etc.). We can simply announce that as a way of blessing God. “Blessed be the Lord” may by our desire that all know His "condition," or let all celebrate His blessed "condition." Noah, Abraham, et al., blessed others with a ...


3

Foreordination is not the same as predestination. Ordination in the Bible typically refers to being set apart to the office in the Priesthood, for example, the members of the house of Aaron were ordained to take care of the tabernacle during the exodus and later the temple. A great example of someone who did not follow through with his ordination is Kind ...


3

In context the scripture reads - Ps. 49:6-9: “Those who are trusting in their means of maintenance, and who keep boasting about the abundance of their riches, not one of them can by any means redeem even a brother, nor give to God a ransom for him; (and the redemption price of their soul is so precious that it has ceased to time indefinite) that he should ...


3

The issue is most likely the numbering of the Psalms in your Bible. Your Georgian translation appears to use the Greek (Septuagint) numbering that is common in Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Bibles, while the Bibles you are comparing against use the numbering of the Hebrew (Masoretic) text. Let's look at Psalm 109 as an example. According to the ...


3

According to Bible scholar B. F. Westcott, this is likely a Greek to English mistranslation, not a Hebrew to Greek mistranslation. Based on the context of the verse, he believes a better rendering would be: "God is Thy throne" or "Thy throne is God". He says (bold mine, italics original): The LXX. admits of two renderings: [ho the·osʹ] ...


3

John Calvin wrote a commentary on the Psalms. He believed that the Psalms were essential to the Christian as they illustrate man's need for God, but also the proper way to ask for that need. In the preface to the commentary , he comments The Psalms, it follows, that in proportion to the proficiency which a man shall have attained in understanding them, ...


3

There are indeed methods for singing / chanting the scriptures. Here is some explanation & teaching of the (Catholic) mechanics. Some lovely Catholic examples: Latin Greek Arabic English Some lovely Orthodox examples: English English Russian (Gospel at about 51:00) Ge'ez


3

Psalm 45 is a love song celebrating a royal wedding. This view is expressed in the New International Version study Bible, the New Living Translation study Bible and the English Standard Version study Bible. In order to avoid falling into the trap of giving a personal opinion, allow me to quote from the comments in the ESV: This is a hymn celebrating a ...


3

The interpretation of the Old Testament in the New is an extremely complex subject and I recommend the book referenced in this summary article about the perspectives involved. However, there is significant support from Jewish sources for reading at least a some, but not all, of the Psalms as Messianic apart from the New Testament and according to Jewish (non-...


3

The vicar will probably just invite you to come up to the lectern to read the Psalm. If any words need to be said either directly before or after the reading, the vicar will deal with that. In Protestant churches the reader might say words to the effect of "May God bless the reading of His Word" after the reading is finished. That may not be ...


3

The St Albans Psalter is a unique individual volume containing the psalms, bound together with some other material. Strictly speaking "psalter" means a copy of the psalms, but is often used to refer to books containing the psalms and other things, in the same way as a "bible" may contain the bible and other material e.g. maps. The St ...


2

The Pulpit Commentary given at one reference says (my emphasis): Verse 16. — Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; or, "my embryo." The Hebrew text has but the single word גלמי, which probably means, "the still unformed embryonic mass" (Hengstenberg). And in thy book all my members were written; literally, all of them; but the ...


2

If you take the entire Psalm in context, you'll see that the writer is being punished by God for some sin of which he is guilty. The situation is described in verses 7-11 (NASB): And now, Lord, for what do I wait?My hope is in You.Deliver me from all my transgressions;Make me not the reproach of the foolish.I have become mute, I do not open my mouth,...


2

Psalms is a collection of songs written by many people, compiled latter by some unknown editor. Though David wrote many songs, he did not write all the songs. Some songs were written before David and some after him. The Psalms were written by numerous people over 1,000 years of Israel 's history. Some of the Psalms were written as far back as the time ...


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