51

The context of Matthew is adultery--relations with a woman who is not your wife. The context of Proverbs is marriage--relations with the woman who is your wife. The difference is quite substantial. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already ...


15

It is problematic to spiritualize verses too quickly. Recall that the Proverbs were written by Jewish people living in the Jewish homeland of Israel under the Mosaic Covenant--not the New Covenant spoken of by Ezekiel and identified by Jesus at the Last Supper. This proverb is speaking about upright and wicked people living in the land of Israel at that ...


13

There are two common interpretations among Protestants: "Wisdom" refers to the Word of God; that is, Jesus "Wisdom" is the personification of a divine attribute, and perhaps a type of Christ, but should not be understood to be Jesus himself The first view was widely held by the church fathers and several centuries of Protestants. ...


9

Proverbs 1:4-5 tells us his audience: 4 for giving prudence to those who are simple, knowledge and discretion to the young— 5 let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance— They were written to the "simple," which the NIV defines as "The Hebrew word rendered simple in Proverbs denotes a person who is gullible, ...


8

I have of late taught that "wisdom" in the book of Proverbs is best understood as the understanding of God's ways or will and the application of such. In other words, acting and behaving in the manner which God intends for us. "Knowledge" can be understood in a similar fashion. This interpretation of wisdom, in my opinion, can be applied to all instances ...


8

Love certainly does not mean ignoring sins or not noticing them at all. It is unloving for us to notice a fellow Christian living in sin and not help them. And when they sin against us, we are not to act like nothing happened in all cases, but we are to confront them Biblically when appropriate. R.C. Sproul Jr. wrote an excellent article on the subject here....


8

In context, Proverbs 1 here is talking about joining with sinful men, plundering and gambling. It is a completely unrelated passage of Scripture. Here it is in-context with the surrounding passages: Warning Against the Invitation of Sinful Men 8 Listen, my son, to your father’s instruction and do not forsake your mother’s teaching. 9 They are ...


7

The common understanding of this apparent conflict is that the two verses describe two situations. One involves answering foolish questions... The ones that are so foolish they don't deserve an answer. The ones that people ask to get a rise out of you, or make a point, when there's no real possibility of an intelligent conversation. The kind we quickly ...


7

It depends what you mean by "once saved, always saved" (OSAS). That is usually a catch phrase of the Free Grace brand of evangelicals (Zane Hodges, Charles Stanley, et al.). That sort of doctrine is refuted better with regard to a James 2-type argument that true faith necessarily results in good works. The other brand of evangelicals that OSAS might ...


7

Catholic theologians have consistently identified "Wisdom" in Proverbs 8 as the Christ. For example, we find a recent example in the Ignatius Catholic Study Bible: The personification of Wisdom in the OT prepares for the revelation of the Trinity in the NT. In particular, this theme reaches its full development when Jesus is revealed as the ...


6

We ask when we have the desire. Take delight in the LORD, and he will give you the desires of your heart. (Psalm 37:4, NIV) Psalms tells us that God will give us the desires of our heart. Simply asking without any sincere desire will not be successful. Only a sincere request is granted. And we should ask according to His will. We can't ask whatever we ...


5

If we carefully consider the doublets of Chapter 25, we see that the immediate context (vv. 1-20) contains themes of judgment, court, and arbitration, all under the authority of a king. 1) It is the glory of God to conceal a matter; to search out a matter is the glory of kings. The final doublet of the chapter should stick out because it directly refers ...


4

I don't know Hebrew, so I can't offer a whole lot of guidance here, but it seems the apparent contradiction could be a result of different language paradigms. It is interesting that the Hebrew texts for the verses seem to use the same word for "fool" and "not a fool". The grammatical structure and conjugation is baffling to me, but according to the Blue ...


4

TL;DR: Bribes that pervert justice are condemned, but gifts which curry favour are allowed and sometimes even a sign of wisdom. שׁחד The Hebrew word for 'bribe' in these verses is the root שׁחד. It only occurs 25 times in the Hebrew Bible which means we can do a comprehensive word study pretty easily. Below I will list most of the verses with this root. I ...


3

Moral: A Wise Man Listens to Advice, Instruction, and Correction A straightforward interpretation of this proverb has more to do with who we should be rather than who we should listen to. All throughout the book, and especially the beginning, the writer urges the reader to choose wisdom instead of foolishness. This maxim is in that vein. It is saying that ...


2

Horses represent warfighting strength; oxen represent productivity strength. God's Word is a deep ocean and seldom does a Proverb have one simple application. While they speak of earthly affairs, they also speak of spiritual affairs. We benefit from understanding them either way (or both ways). Oxen are submissive animals used for their great physical ...


2

A proverb uses equal and opposite idealism to get its point across. If no work is being done, then you have no fruits from labor. If much work is being done, then you have much fruits from labor. This was not to suggest that no work should be done. The oxen was used in those days as a worker, and the manger being empty was showing what results from no work ...


2

What is the Fear of the Lord? The word Fear in the Hebrew is one of God's Names. Fear is our reaction when we see God as He really is and then see ourselves in the light of who God is." The Fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. The Fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge. The Fear of the Lord is to hate evil. The Fear of the Lord is ...


2

I don't see how the surrounding verses lead one to think about science; that sounds like eisegesis to me (reading a matter into the text). Perhaps God conceals a matter to get kings exercised in searching for it. Biblical truths, for example, are scattered far and wide in the scriptures and we must do much hunting to pull the pieces together. In support of ...


2

The blood ofJesus was shed to deal with the remission of sins. This means the penalty of sin has been removed. Said another way, God is not going to punish us for our shortcomings. This is what it means to "cover" sins. God is telling us not to punish another for their shortcomings which impede upon our liberties (vegeance is mines saith the Lord). Jesus did ...


2

Living wisely allows a person to avoid a great deal of calamity. For instance, someone who is wise with his money and stores up wealth for his later years can enjoy the blessings of wisdom, whereas someone who spends money foolishly will suffer for that. So, there is blessing in living wisely with the things of this world. However, Ecclesiastes probably ...


2

Early (pre-Nicaea) church fathers interpreted this verse christologically in the sense that Christ is eternally begotten of the Father. Ellicott writes that this was the view held by early fathers like Justin Martyr and Tertullian: When in Christian times it was observed how well the description of Wisdom in Job and Proverbs harmonised with that of God ...


2

After comparing this verse with the New International Version and the New Living Translation Bible, it seems that the meaning of the Hebrew word used is uncertain. Both the NIV and the NLT translate that particular word as “thirty sayings.” The NLT Study Bible notes acknowledge that some Bibles prefer to translate the word as “excellent sayings.” The notes ...


2

I actually read an article recently that mentions in passing this concept (that Wisdom is Jesus.) The article first speaks of the Greek Concept of Logos and mentions, “Beginning at least as early as the apologist Justin Martyr (A.D. 125), Christians, almost without exception, identified Sophia (the Greek equivalent of Heb. ḥoḵmâ) in Proverbs 8 with Jesus ...


1

Consider the following passages: Psalm 37:4 "Delight yourself in YHWH, and he will give you the desires of your heart. Deuteronomy 4:29 "But from there [among the world] you will seek YHWH your God, and you will find Him if you search for Him with all your heart and all your life." Jeremiah 29:11-14 "For I know the plans I have for you,” ...


1

the answer is--- yes. We do both. We ask God to give us wisdom; all wisdom comes from Him. We could live for eighty years and not get true biblical wisdom if we don't ask God. But we have to seek it, too. We won't be sleeping one morning and 60 lbs of wisdom come crashing through the roof and wake us up. We have to do things to seek wisdom; praying, ...


1

Agur was a compiler (not the actual Sacred Author) of part of the collection of Proverbs in the book of Proverbs, which forms part of the Old Testament. His contribution to this book is mainly in Chapter 30 of the book. His name could suggest that he is free from earthly transgressions. It could also mean 'He who understood the will of the Lord'. Lemuel is ...


1

Consider the wisdom books (Ecclesiastes, Proverbs, Job) not only as complementary, differing in focus and filling out the ideas by considering difficult cases, but also as a progression. Ecclesiastes begins with a lost person, who despite a measure of wisdom, is confused about the meaning and purpose of life and unable to find the most enjoyable course to ...


1

I think Keil's, Commentary on the Old Testament has it right. I summarize them as this: You should NOT recognize the foolish assumptions of a fool. You should NOT answer as though his questions or statements were reasonable, that would be debasing your own self and your own mind. Rather you SHOULD answer a fool as is due to according to his folly. You ...


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