25

Dietary rules among Christians vary from sect to sect. The starting point for understanding the Christian views on food regulation is in the book of Acts, chapter 10, when Peter has a vision and is told that he may eat any kind of food, even unclean food that does not meet Jewish regulations, such as pork. This is symbolic: Peter was told that Gentiles who ...


13

The answer which focuses on Acts 10 is excellent, but this statement from the Jerusalem Council, also recorded in the book of Acts, is also pertinent: It is my judgment, therefore, that we should not make it difficult for the Gentiles who are turning to God. Instead we should write to them, telling them to abstain from food polluted by idols, from sexual ...


12

There are Reformed Christians who are not Presbyterian (or at least wouldn't call themselves that), especially in the Dutch or Continental tradition such as the RCUS and URCNA. There are also Presbyterians that are not Reformed, such as many in the PCUSA, who would be better called "liberal". Further complicating the matter is that, as Brian Johnson pointed ...


8

Note that this doesn't apply to all groups that adhere to Sola Fide. Plenty of groups believe that we have no part in our own salvation, even in choosing to believe, but this is one perspective that's relatively common among Evangelicals. Short version: These verses are simply Jesus teaching on the true definition of what God's standard for "good" is. ...


8

(Although I can't speak for all Presbyterians, as we are diverse bunch, I think that what I say here is representative of the mainstream. I welcome correction if I am wrong about this.) When Communion is served, we do use a table of some kind. The table recalls the Last Supper, at which the practice of Communion was instituted; Matthew 26:20, Mark 14:18, ...


7

Theological issues To get it straight from the horses' mouths, you can read Van Til's complaint [PDF] and Clark's answer [PDF] online. Both are very long and in-depth and also spend a good deal of time on procedural matters before getting to the theological. But if you really want to know and understand the ins and outs of what was at stake, primary sources ...


7

Chapter 57 from The Book of Church Order--part of the PCA's doctrinal standards, along with the Westminster Confession of Faith--(a link to such in pdf format can be found here) is titled "The Admission of Persons to Sealing Ordinances". Children who have been infant-baptised are not to take part in communion: 57-1. Believers’ children within the ...


7

Christianity is broad in its beliefs of what may be eaten and what may not be eaten (see Acts 15, 1Co 8, and Gal 2:11-14 for a peek at early church debates on what foods may or may not be eaten). Many Christians will point to Mark 7:19 or Acts 10:1-11:18 to indicate that God has declared all foods clean. Others recognize that Jesus did not abolish the law (...


6

As you mention, evangelicalism refers to a movement that typically emphasizes salvation through faith in Christ, the authority of the Bible, evangelism, and a conversion experience. On the other hand, presbyterianism refers primarily to a form of church government. In this system, elders rule the church – a session of elders is responsible for leading ...


6

Let's compare what Paul said in the Greek with a consideration of the doctrine of perseverance, in light of what several commentators taught on 1 Corinthians 9:27. "Adokimos" The word in 1Co 9:27 that is commonly translated as "disqualified" is "adokimos" (ἀδόκιμος) in the Greek (Strongs G96), and was normally used to refer to adulterated currencies, ...


5

The Presbyterian model of the Lord's Supper is explicitly laid out in the Westminster Confession, which until about a hundred and thirty years ago was followed by most Presbyterian Churches to the letter. Today, really only the Free Kirk (or the "wee frees" as they are known) still maintain this strict tradition. There are no altars as Christ's sacrifice on ...


5

The gospel never promises anyone with fake faith salvation. Rather it uses both encouragements and warnings as a means to preserve all the elect into everlasting eternity. This sort of question can be asked from many verses in the Bible because it rests upon a sometimes-unconscious assumption that ‘God would never warn someone of something, that according ...


5

All Catholic churches I have attended have you line up to the front, you are given a communion (either placed in your hand or in your mouth), and on the way back to your seat is a wine bearer, who will offer you a sip from the cup. Unless you place the host in your mouth and then partake from the wine cup, it would not be possible to do this. In other ...


5

There's no inherent incompatibility. Both denominations believe in forms of apostolic succession (though not the kind asserted by the Catholic Church.) Wikipedia explains: The Anglican Communion "has never officially endorsed any one particular theory of the origin of the historic episcopate, its exact relation to the apostolate, and the sense in which it ...


4

Regarding belief, the Church of Scotland is entirely independent of the state in matters spiritual (and is a "national church" not a state church). Regarding practices, the call to be a "national church" means a self-understanding not to neglect areas of the country which are less prosperous or populous. The Church of Scotland is struggling to maintain a ...


4

The "Basis of Union" can be found here: http://www.urc.org.uk/what_we_do/the_manual/the_basis_of_union For me, understanding any denomination usually hinges on two issues - salvation and governance. In my head, most any other distinctive could be chalked up to a peculiar practice or worship style, with its own concomitant theology. The comparatives are ...


4

This is an English translation issue, not a Protestant/Catholic issue. Latin is the official language of the Catholic Church and the Latin says: Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie, et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris


4

American Presbyterians have indeed made a number of significant changes to the Westminster Confession through the years. Some portions of the Confession have been revised (or outright rejected) by most American Presbyterians, while other changes provoked (or were the result of) debate and division. The most significant changes can be broken down as follows:...


4

I would refer you to another article by Kevin DeYoung that is included in the belhar confession: yea or nay. In it DeYoung points out that: "there are a few lines that cannot be supported by Scripture" (an example DeYoung includes is "We believe that God, in a world full of injustice and enmity, is in a special way the God of the destitute, the poor and ...


4

You are correct that John Chavis, although he is reported to have been the first college-educated Black/African in America, was never ordained. He was licenced to minister. It appears that John Gloucester, the founder of the first African American Presbyterian Church in the US, was the first African American Presbyterian ordained. His ordination was on ...


4

I'll quote from two notable opponents of these two chapters. The first is John Murray; his comments on the Confession were published in 1936 in the newsletter edited by J. Gresham Machen, the founder of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. The second is the 2014 report of the study committee of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, which recommended that ...


4

I've been going to a Protestant Presbyterian church for 20 years now, with the metrical Scottish Psalter (led by a presentor) the only source of our musical worship up until 2010. It used the 1650 version approved by the Church of Scotland. I can only answer with regard to my particular denomination. Other Protestant Presbyterian groups may have other ...


3

I asked this question when I was first exploring becoming a foster parent. Three years later, I have had two foster children both of which remained unbaptized while in our care. Because a Presbyterian view of baptism is that it is the sign of covenant membership. Since foster children are not legally and covenantally permanent members of the family prior to ...


3

I don't think any denominational body has ruled on this; until one does so, it remains a matter of conscience for individual believers. Part of the difficulty is that foster care as a named/organized phenomenon only goes back to the 19th century. That said, there seem to be two main schools of thought: yes and no. End of answer. I'm kidding... but those ...


3

From the point-of-view of someone who belives in the Doctrines of Grace The doctrine of Perseverance of Saints as defined in the link you provided Perseverance of the saints is the Calvinist doctrine that those who are truly saved will persevere to the end and cannot lose their salvation. It doesn't mean that a person who is truly saved will never ...


3

The word that is translated Presbyter in both places (or elder in some translations) is πρεσβύτερος or presbyteros. (Strong's G4245) There were four types of leader in the early church: 1. apostles (ἀπόστολος or apostolos meaning delegate or messenger) 2. bishops (ἐπισκοπή or episkopē meaning overseer or guardian) 3. presbyters (πρεσβύτερος or presbyteros ...


3

Presbyterian is a name that defines a large body of believers. As mentioned above though, there are MANY Presbyterian denominations. As in all large groups, there will be vastly different opinions and beliefs of its members. Some members within a single Presbytery (local group of Pressie churches) will hold to the Westminster Standards (as mentioned ...


3

No, that is not correct Your friends/associates are speaking from ignorance (at best), and possibly out of spite. Papal Infallibility Per the Ecumenical Council now referred to as Vatican I (1870), papal infallibility relates to declarations made ex cathedra pertaining to faith and morals. (Catholic Encyclopedia, Infalliblity, Explanation of papal ...


3

The Presbyterian Churches of America have in their church order a section on membership. This does not require the members to adopt all the doctrines of the church, but it does require a credible profession of faith in Christ. CHAPTER 6 Church Members 6-1. The children of believers are, through the covenant and by right of birth, non-communing ...


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