14

Luther did not recant. From: John Alfred Faulkner, "Luther and the Bigamous Marriage of Philip of Hesse, The American Journal of Theology Vol. 17, No. 2 (Apr., 1913), pp. 206-231 (on pp. 228-9) - Whatever occasional regret on account of the scandal Luther may have felt, he never wavered as to the essential right of his course with Philip. In June, 1540, ...


13

Both @MaskedPlant and @Matt spelled out how the Journal of Discourses is viewed. I will add this; the only thing I have ever heard was during the whole "The Da Vinci Code" hoopla. And that was that the LDS church had no official opinion and that it neither endorsed or found fault with the ideas presented in that book. (Namely of course that Christ was ...


11

As a general rule, if a particular practice was present in a culture but considered sinful, there were commandments against it. This is the basis of a principle in historical cultural studies that if there is a law against a particular practice in the written or oral codes of a culture, then that practice did exist in the culture. Based on the absence of ...


9

God's Standard Should Be Our Standard The biblical standard regarding marriage, from Genesis to Revelation is One groom, one bride, what e'er betide. Or in slightly less old fashioned verbiage: One husband, one wife, for life. God never sanctioned polygyny in the Tanakh, nor did Jesus sanction it in the New Covenant. God's design from the beginning ...


8

There was polygamy, or plural wives, in the Old Testament. Starting with the (NRSV) Bible. Sarai gave Hagar to Abram as his wife, Genesis 16:1–11 Jacob received Leah and Rachel and their handmaidens as wives, Genesis 29:21–28, Genesis 30:4, 9, 26. If a man take another wife, he shall not diminish the first wife’s possessions, Exodus 21:10 David and his two ...


8

Although the narrator in Kings and Chronicles may not say so, Deuteronomy does say it was a sin, in Deuteronomy 17:15-17 [15] you shall surely set a king over you whom the Lord your God chooses; one from among your brethren you shall set as king over you; you may not set a foreigner over you, who is not your brother. [16] But he shall not multiply ...


7

The closest that any of the NT books come to even mentioning polygamy are the pastoral epistles when Paul says that a leader must be the husband of one wife. 2 Timothy 3:1-2 ESV The saying is trustworthy: If anyone aspires to the office of overseer, he desires a noble task. Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-...


7

Polygamy is not currently an acceptable thing to do, previously was an acceptable thing to do, and will again (at least temporarily) be an acceptable thing to do. Polygamy is useful for multiplying populations... especially when the women outnumber the men dramatically, as frequently happened in wars when all the young and middle aged men would go to war on ...


7

Polygamy is one of the more difficult subjects to study of early LDS history, because the environment in which it was practiced necessitated secrecy as a result of the hostility toward the Church and it's usefulness as a polemical tool for the enemies of the Church. However, credible research is continually trickling out, and we now have some great ...


6

That was never the official teaching of the LDS Church. The Journal of Discourses is a book and is not, nor has ever been, canonical scripture, or any other type of scripture for that matter, to the LDS. See the answers to this question: What is the Journal of Discourses viewed as?


6

The Bible never says Solomon's multiple wives was not a sin. It was actually the reason he lost his kingdom. In 1 Kings 11:4 his multiple wives drew him away from his full devotion to The Lord and eventually to other gods. In 1 Kings 11:11, The Lord tells Solomon that because he did not keep God's covenant, He would take away Solomon's kingdom and give it to ...


5

Was this ever the official teaching of the LDS Church? If so, what biblical support for these doctrines is there? No. It is not the official teaching. I would refer you to this answer for more information on why this has never been official teaching of the LDS church. This is a link to lds.org with a question about the journal of Discourses. Scroll down ...


5

Edits: So, after the question changed... here's the answer to the new question; my original answer is below... though they do mingle some similar points and should both be considered. This answer reflects my own thoughts on the matter, but I'm of course no clergy in the LDS Church... New Answer The LDS Church doesn't hold opinions against anyone. Everyone ...


4

There does not seem to be any LDS view on 1 Timothy 3 requirements during the time they practiced polygamy (searched LDS website and Joseph Smith Papers). The LDS believe in modern prophets who receive revelation. As members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we are blessed to be led by living prophets—inspired men called to speak for ...


3

A partial answer (I don't know the complete answer yet): Henry Eyring, famed chemist and father of President Henry B. Eyring, currently the second counselor in the Church's First Presidency, grew up in a polygamist family. His father was married to two women, who were sisters. According to the biography "Mormon Scientist", authored by Henry J. Eyring (...


3

According to the LDS Church, of which Joseph Smith was the founder, "Latter-day Saints do not understand all of God’s purposes for instituting, through His prophets, the practice of plural marriage during the 19th century. The Book of Mormon identifies one reason for God to command it: to increase the number of children born in the gospel covenant in order ...


3

It depends who you ask. 35 according to historian Todd Compton. 43 according to author George D. Smith. 47 according to author Fawn Brodie. Some of his wives seem to have had additional husbands.


3

The Church has never recognized polygamous unions formed outside the Church. The authority to enter into a polygamous union is given in Doctrine & Covenants 132 and can only be done (when it was authorized) inside an LDS temple (when temples were available) by Priesthood holders authorized to use the Sealing Keys. Hypothetically, back when the Church ...


2

The New Testament explicitly prohibits polyandry: Thus a married woman is bound by the law to her husband as long as he lives; but if her husband dies, she is discharged from the law concerning the husband. Accordingly, she will be called an adulteress if she lives with another man while her husband is alive. But if her husband dies, she is free ...


2

Christianity forbids polygamy but allows widow remarriage. I agree with you that Gal 3:28 is not usually cited as support for the rejection of polygamy, because the passage context is about unity of Gentiles and Jews in Christ (notice the contrasts of social groups in the verse). Ken Graham already covered the OT view of polygamy, so I will not repeat it ...


1

The Bible forbids neither polygamy, nor widow remarriage. Remarriage: For the married woman is bound by law to her husband while he is living; but if her husband dies, she is released from the law concerning the husband. So then, if while her husband is living she is joined to another man, she shall be called an adulteress; but if her husband dies, she ...


1

I do not believe my answer is authoritative, but I believe it to be possible. Without commentary from both early Church leaders and Paul or Christ themselves, it's difficult to provide a definitive answer. Jesus did not impose the restrictions on Bishops found in 1 Timothy. Paul did. I suppose it is assumed by Christianity at large that this would be ...


1

Early LDS leader Orson Hyde said the following, though this is not official church doctrine: I discover that some of the Eastern papers represent me as a great blasphemer, because I said in a lecture on Marriage at our last Conference that Jesus Christ was married at Cana of Galilee, that Mary, Martha, and others were his wives, and that he begot children....


1

I'm LDS so I can tell you that there is no set doctrine on this but there always is discussions of it amongst the members. None of the answers above actually answer the second part of the question, about there being biblical proof. True there is no reference to Christ being married in the bible directly. But what people use as proof, that it could be ...


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