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13

Piotr Ashwin-Siejkowski in his book, The Apostles's Creed: and its Early Christian Context, argues that Pilate was specifically mentioned primarily in order to argue for and defend the humanity and real death of Jesus. He first emphasizes the historical importance of Pilate to Christianity: Certainly the Scriptural detail that Jesus of Nazareth was ...


10

In short, no. Pilate had a choice. In Jesus' conversation with him, He says this: Jesus answered, “You would have no power over me if it were not given to you from above. Therefore the one who handed me over to you is guilty of a greater sin.” John 19:11 ESV The Jewish religious leaders--not all Jews--were guilty of a greater sin than Pilate, even ...


10

History records that Pilate was not the most even tempered of men. Considering this, I find that it is quite probable that the words would have been intended more as mockery than anything else. Traditions related to Pilate are a good deal more vague. While the apocryphal "Passion (or Gospel) according to St. Peter" exonerates him, the majority of writings ...


9

Scripture doesn't explain what Pilate was thinking when he said "What is truth." I know that Pilate has always been portrayed by Catholic moral theologians as the archetype of the man who wants to please everyone, of the pusillanimous man who doesn't have the courage to take a tough stand because of the personal costs. Perhaps the best dramatization of ...


8

There is reason to believe that the language Pilate communicated with Jesus was Greek. After all it was the language of commerce at that time throughout the Mediterranean world. Let us not forget that Pilate's inscription on the Title of the Cross was written in Latin, Greek and Hebrew. "This title then read many of the Jews: for the place where Jesus was ...


8

I would say probable forgery. First searching for the letter before a link/source was added revealed at least 3 letters, each is written differently: Letter of Pilate to Tiberius 1 - Unable to verify by finding an image of the original Greek manuscript Letter from Pontius Pilate to Tiberius Caesar - mentions Copies are in the Congressional Library in ...


8

Crucifixion was more than a method of execution; it was a public execution, and a long, slow, exceptionally painful one at that. Half the point was to make an example of the condemned so they could act as a deterrent. Part of the process was to identify the person and their crime, which was done by putting a sign on the cross. Thing is, Pilate couldn't ...


7

Of course Pilate is not portrayed as a Christian, or even a good man, let alone a saint. However, nearly all bible commentators agree that Pilate was trying to avoid crucifying Christ. Undoubtedly it was political pressure from the Jewish leaders that forced his hand against his own will. First Pilate really did not care about the silly religious ...


7

It's important to remember that just a few days earlier, Jesus had warned his disciples: Matthew 18: 7: Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh! Yes, having Jesus be betrayed and killed was part of the plan, but that does not mean that the specific persons who ...


5

Yes Pilate carried out God's plans but his actions were still sinful. In Acts 2:23 Peter explained that the crucifixion was God's plan carried out by the Jewish and Gentile leaders: But God knew what would happen, and his prearranged plan was carried out when Jesus was betrayed. With the help of lawless Gentiles, you nailed him to a cross and killed him. (...


3

Herod the Great, who was Herod's father and King of Judea during the birth of Christ, had been granted his title by the Roman Senate. As King, he had authority over all Judea and surrounding territories. Upon the death of Herod the Great, his kingdom was divided among his sons, with Herod Archelaus inheriting the land of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea; Herod ...


3

You are asking this from the perspective of a Christian. Now step back, and consider it from the perspective of the observer, here re-phrased a bit: (19) the religious authorities ask some questions (20-21) the defendant refuses to answer them (23) the defendant retorts "charges or I walk" (24) the defendant is sent to the high religious authority; what was ...


2

We don't yet know. Even if God used Pilate as an instrument in his plan of salvation, we don't know enough details about the rest of Pilate's life. Whatever else he might have done or not done, if he truly repented before his death, he would have gone to heaven; if he did not repent, he would not have.


2

First, the Creed does not say Pilate killed Jesus. As you point out in your question, there was plenty of blame to go around for Jesus' death. Biblically, we (i.e., you and me and every person who ever lived) are partly to blame. Let's also not forget that God the Father . . . did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all . . .. This ...


2

The Wikipedia entry for Latin lists it's spread to Palestine/Judea in the late first and early second century A.D. Prior to that, Hellenization spread Greek culture and language throughout the Mediterranean beginning with Alexander the Great around 300 B.C. It seems unlikely a Roman, either Pilate or Herod, would take the time to learn Hebrew or Aramaic, ...


2

I ran across mention of this letter and did some sleuthing. I have no idea where the claims to copies being in various libraries came from, but I did manage to track down its publication in English. It's printed in The Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 8. Edited by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1916.) ...


1

I found an excellent article showing the precursors of the Apostle's creed with translations in the original Greek, Latin, and English. It appears that the Pontius Pilate reference was unchanged, and the translation variations between "under Pontius Pilate" and "in the days of Pontius Pilate" don't change the meaning, which is simply to fix the historical ...


1

There are a few speculations on what exactly this verse means. St. Thomas Aquinas compiled gospel commentaries of Church fathers in the Catena Aurea. I have copied the relevant comments from the Catena below: Raban.: It is to be noted, that the bench (tribunal) is the seat of the judge, the throne (solium) of the king, the chair (cathedra) of the master. ...


1

Assuming they spoke without a translator, they almost certainly used Greek (Koine or common version). The Romans greatly respected Greek culture from who they derived so much of their culture, all educated Romans knew Greek, and, most importantly, Greek was the administrative language of the Eastern part of the Roman empire (since the Romans knew Greek and ...


1

Throughout the Bible we see that God uses not only people, but circumstance and even Nature to affect his plans. When God uses people to fulfill his needs, God uses that person's natural tendencies to do his will. God does not change a person to fit the situation; he changes the situation to fit the persons natural tendencies. Take the following Scriptures ...


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