18

First of all, the assertion that "With God, all things are possible" is valid and scriptural. Matthew 19:26 (NIV) 26  Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.” However, it would be a mistake to assume that God's omnipotence means he can act against his nature. Hebrews tells us: Hebrews ...


17

Mainstream Christianity - Catholicism, Orthodox, and the various Protestant denominations, God doesn't have a form. He is spirit, omnipresent, and not confined to a single place. He doesn't have a form. (Although He could manifest one and speak through it, such as a burning bush...) Of course, when He came to earth as Christ (as mainstream Christianity ...


11

You are not the first person in history to make such observations. One person who articulated it well is the late Clive Staples: "I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else." -- C.S. Lewis Another man, circa the same erra and place, who argued emphatically that ...


10

Caleb mentions some great names. C.S. Lewis and G.K. Chesterston are good theologian philosophers who, I think, argue a strong rational support of Christianity. Cornelius Van Til is another good one, who, I believe, argues that apart from God, there is no rational basis for rationality. This kind of gets to Andrew Leach's comment; I don't disagree ...


10

Origin - Loci Communes Theologici, 1521 A.D. The words notitia, assensus, and fiducia applied to faith originates with the Reformers of the 16th Century. Martin Luther argued that saving faith or true faith is a fides viva, a vital or living faith (Sproul, 2010, pg.47). This concept was further explicated by one of Luther's contemporaries, Philip ...


9

Does God have no shape or form? Objection 1 The book of Genesis uses these words to describe man's creation “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. (Genesis 1:26 NIV) therefore, God must look like man. Objection 2 Throughout the Old Testament, the Spirit of God has appeared as moving flames, columns of fire and burning bushes. Columns of ...


8

Regarding your first question, there is a key difference between your two examples. They would be more parallel if you framed the first one like this: God is the most perfect possible being that can be thought of. Non-existence or a lack of regular competition in barbecuing championships would be an imperfection. Therefore, God exists and regularly ...


8

The concept is biblical: John 7:37 Now on the last day, the great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried out, saying, "If any man is thirsty, let him come to Me and drink. 38 "He who believes in Me, as the Scripture said, 'From his innermost being shall flow rivers of living water.'" 39 But this He spoke of the Spirit, whom those who believed in Him were ...


8

There is a fundamental flaw in the logic here. Genesis 4 clearly applies to a single person - the person who kills Cain. Generalizing this to any executioner is not supported by the text. To wit: 'Very well, then,' Yahweh replied, 'whoever kills Cain will suffer a sevenfold vengeance.' Indeed, if it did call for that, Genesis 9:6 would be ...


7

"Is it anti Christian" is a Truth question. Answering in such a way as to avoid that... From a doctrinal or even denominational perspective, the answer is "no". Do some Christians think this way? Yes. The author of the article does, however, quite accurately describe the mindset of certain types of individuals within more conservative, fundemantalist ...


7

Its not necessary for a person to have a religion to have good moral codes. Hammurabi (1792-1750 BC) was a Babylonian King who gave one of the First Law in the World. The law was very similar the Mosaic Law, "Eye for eye, tooth for tooth". Exodus 21:24 Eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, 25 burn for burn, wound for wound, ...


7

Mainline Seminaries I went to a very conservative seminary and read Girard's Scapegoat, though the overall position of the school disagreed with it. However, that we read it indicates its prevalence in academic institutions. Others I know who went to mainline seminaries, however, are very well versed in Girard. In Rowan Williams' (former archbishop of ...


7

Let's take a look at Paul. The book of Acts details the spread of the Gospel from Jerusalem into wider Judea and Samaria, then off through Syria, Asia, Greece, before it concludes with Paul preaching the Gospel in the capital city of the Roman Empire. If we follow along with the way the Christians are preaching the Gospel, we find that once they start ...


6

Yes, Catholics must believe in the historicity of Christ. Is there some philosophical doctrine in Catholicism which does not require to believe in the historicity of Christ No. This is the heresy of Modernism, whose philosophical foundation is agnosticism. Pope St. Pius X condemned the following proposition as heretical in Lamentabili Sane (1907): ...


5

I have not heard any Christian claim this in any academic setting. The most Christians usually say about morality in this context is that without a transcendent law giver no absolute morality can be derived and that without one we are left with either a regress into subjectivity or a complete denial of morality. Or in other words if God is dead than all ...


5

Even when a philosophy is contrary to Christianity, it is often good to study it, so as to be able to understand what other people think. Such philosophies may also have valid points, despite some erroneous parts. For example, Marxism, which is fundamentally incompatible with Christianity because it is explicitly materialistic and promotes a violent class ...


5

Plantinga is definitely a Calvinist, though most Calvinists would call him an inconsistent one. Reformed teaching plays a very significant, if at-times tangential, role in much of his work. (For example his work on epistemology is known as Reformed Epistemology) He's known for Molinism because of his books God, Freedom & Evil and The Nature of Necessity ...


5

Here's S.Th., I, q.46, a.2, ad 7, for reference: In efficient causes it is impossible to proceed to infinity "per se"—thus, there cannot be an infinite number of causes that are "per se" required for a certain effect; for instance, that a stone be moved by a stick, the stick by the hand, and so on to infinity. But it is not impossible to ...


5

The problem is known as "theodicy". Actually, this is just one portion of the problem of theodicy, but it's part of the "How can a good God permit evil?" question. "How God could create beings that will go to Hell" is subset of the problem of theodicy. This is one of the most commonly covered questions in the field of Apologetics. A Bing/Google/(Choose ...


5

Yes. In his book, The Problem of Pain, popular Christian author C.S. Lewis discusses Adam's sin in the context of Scientific understanding of his time, which included Darwinism. He presents an understanding in which those creatures, guided by the hand of God, became man. Despite Lewis' prominence in twentieth century Christianity, this particular viewpoint ...


4

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses this directly in the Summa. Article 6. Whether in God there are any accidents? I answer that, From all we have said, it is clear there can be no accident in God. First, because a subject is compared to its accidents as potentiality to actuality; for a subject is in some sense made actual by its accidents. But there ...


4

@Martin.kv Good answer! I would only add Romans 8:28 And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. All things, whether good or bad, work together for good to those who love God and follow His plan for them. Like Joseph said in Genesis 50:20 to his brothers But as for ...


4

From the works of Philo we can see how he saw the logos, or word/wisdom directly and try to compare a bit with Plato and with Christ. But the divine word which is above these does not come into any visible appearance, inasmuch as it is not like to any of the things that come under the external senses, but is itself an image of God, the most ancient of all ...


4

If God, were only transcendant, perhaps there would be something to what you're saying, But Orthodox (in the wider sense of the word) Christian teaching is that God is both transcendant (we can't know Him fully) and Immanent - he is 'close' and fully able to communicate to his creatures clearly (at least to their level of comprehension). Orthodox ...


4

Anselm of Canterbury attempts to do exactly this in his Monologion, an 11th century work that attempts to logically deduce God's existence and attributes without the use of Scripture. Overview in Proslogion Anselm's later and better-known work, Proslogion, provides a helpful summary: after establishing the existence of God through the ontological argument (§...


4

The answer, in short, is that recognizing the centrality of man is far from outdated and cannot be branded as mere “anthropocentrism.” Man is qualitatively different from and, in fact, superior to all other material creatures, and this fact can be shown by a relatively easy philosophical reflection. (I will preface my answer by saying that I understood the ...


4

David Bartholomew's view is that God uses chance. The idea that God may have actually used chance, and still be using chance, may help to dispel the negative role it often plays in current theology. 1 As mentioned in a previous article, unpredictability is an all-pervasive part of life, and it contributes much to the excitement and interest of living. ... ...


4

Although St. Thomas Aquinas is said to have "reconciled" Aristotle with Christian theology, he rejects much of Aristotle (e.g., he rejects that Aristotle thought the world is eternal).(Interestingly, St. Thomas refers to Aristotle as "Aristotle" when he disagrees with him and as "The Philosopher" when he agrees with him.) Understand Scholastic terminology. ...


4

It's frustrating when an asker of a question then goes on to provide what he or she considers to be the correct answer. Perhaps that is why nobody has bothered to give an answer until now (2 years and 4 months later). After all, what is there left to say when you provide fulsome quotes that appear to confirm your conclusion, namely, "This is sedevacantism ...


4

God is not a person. God is a Being. Within the One Being of God subsist the three persons of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Together, these three make up the One Being of God. When Jesus was baptised in the River Jordan, all three were present: the Father whose voice was heard from heaven, the Son who was being baptised, and the Holy Spirit who ...


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