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To understand spiritual Death and Life in regards to Trinitarian doctrines of the Resurrection, consider John 4:24 in relationship to Psalm 51:13 where we learn the Holy Spirit (Ruach Qadesh, ר֥וּחַ קָ֜דְשְׁ ) is the bond that joins us to YHVH. [Psalm 51:13] "Do not cast me away from before You, and do not take Your holy spirit from me." (אַל־...


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You answered your own question a bit: It was Jesus' body that died. When we refer to someone dying we usually mean one's physical body is dying. Atheists then think the human is "entirely" dead (no longer existent). In fact, nobody "dies" like this, just their bodies. The deceased then go to Heaven, hell or purgatory. Jesus' body was dead ...


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You are asking about the "Trinitarians" view, not about a certain denomination. Because there are many different Trinitarian denominations, various different answers to your question exist. God can't die, therefore Jesus isn't God. Jesus dying ... and God ... dying In my youth I heard about various books written by Christian theologians arguing ...


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The Doctrinal Position Trinitarian position usually includes the doctrine of Jesus's having two natures in one person (Hypostatic Union). Armed with both the doctrine of Trinity and the Hypostatic Union, the standard explanation of what happened when Jesus died on the cross is as follows: The Divine nature of Jesus did not die or cease to exist Neither God ...


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Trinitarian orthodoxy can be formulated on the basis of 3 sets of NT statements, each consisting of one primary and several supporting statements: 1. 'yet for us there is one God, the Father,' (1 Cor 8:6a) "This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God," (Jn 17:3a) Jesus answered, "The foremost [commandment] is, 'Hear this O ...


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This response has been extracted from a longer article of mine on the subject (linked at the end) , hence the discontinuous numbering of its sections. 1. Ousía in Greek philosophical discourse Deriving then from the verb "to be", as we can see in [4] ousía enters the Greek philosophical discourse with Plato, who uses it to mean the primary, ...


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The Wikipedia article on Hypostasis makes it clear that there was some confusion in terminology due to language difficulties of Latin, Greek and English. The concepts being referred to are confused by misunderstanding what 'substance' and 'essence' actually mean when applied to Divine Persons. It was mainly under the influence of the Cappadocian Fathers ...


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The difficulty with this article written by Jacob Allee for CARM (20 June 2011) is that not one single verse from the Bible is given. Instead, the author uses a philosophical approach to show how the being of God is different to the being of a human. Here are the relevant quotes from his article: The Bible teaches that within the one being that is God, ...


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My understanding is that the scriptures convey that three Divine Persons share one divine nature. I and the Father are one. [John 10:30, Young's Literal Translation] . . . . . . . expresses a shared nature but different personalities. One could re-word this and say that three Divine Persons share one divine existence. Fulness being an attribute of divine ...


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