21

General references to there being separate personages in the Godhead. Luke 3:21-22 (Matthew 3:13-17 similar story/wording) 21 Now when all the people were baptized, it came to pass, that Jesus also being baptized, and praying, the heaven was opened, 22 And the Holy Ghost descended in a bodily shape like a dove upon him, and a voice came from heaven, ...


17

Short answer is that the Mormon God, Heavenly Father, is as supreme as it's going to get. On your misconceptions on the Mormon belief about God: Not creating matter - you are correct in your understanding You ask the learned doctors why they say the world was made out of nothing, and they will answer, “Doesn’t the Bible say he created the world?” And ...


15

Here are four common defenses of this doctrine: The masculine pronoun in Greek is applied to the Holy Spirit even when not required by Greek grammar The Holy Spirit is shown to be in a coordinating relationship with other persons, such as the Father and Son, as well as humans, suggesting that he also is a Person The Holy Spirit has personal attributes and ...


15

The short answer is that, from the Catholic Church’s perspective, God did not merely choose to reveal Himself as Father. Rather, He is Father by nature, in two respects: through the eternal generation of the Son in the Holy Trinity, and in His act of creating, especially the creation of those creatures that are “in his image” (see Gen. 1:26). Therefore, ...


14

The Queen of England is greater than me in that she is my Queen and I am her loyal subject.. but we are equal in that we are both human. My father is greater than me in that he is my father, but we are equal in nature, in that we are both human. The Son of God is, and always has been from eternity, subordinate to the Father in his role as the Son. This ...


12

No problem for Trinitarians at all. The context of 1 Corinthians 15:27 is actually a big problem for Unitarians. 1 Corinthians 15:27-28 [27]For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. [28]And when all things shall be subdued unto ...


11

Yes. I have been able to find two letters, one related to the calling of the Council of Nicea and the other related to the judgment of the Council of Constantinople, where the word "persons" is used to describe the relations within the Godhead. Council of Nicea (325) First, some background. Alexander of Alexandria's conflict with Arius was the impetus for ...


10

The classic definition of "Person" is that given by Boethius in De persona et duabus naturis: an individual substance of a rational nature). St. Thomas Aquinas explained the preceding definition in terms that practically constitute a new definition: a substance, complete, subsisting per se, existing apart from others (Summa Theologica, III, Q. xvi, a. 12, ...


10

Tertullian: Earliest extant use of term Tertullian (155 - 240) was, famously, the first Latin writer to use the word "trinity" in his anti-Sabellian treatise Against Praxeas. It also contains the earliest known uses (16 total) of the word "persons" in reference to the Godhead. The mystery of the dispensation is still guarded, which distributes the Unity ...


9

Historically, there was a group of persons who claimed to be Christians, but denied the divinity of the Holy Spirit. They were derided by orthodox Christians as Pneumatomachoi (literally, “those who fight the Spirit”) or Macedonians (after the proponent of this idea, named Macedonius—no relation to the geographical region by that name). The Macedonians ...


9

Jonathan Edwards' Ontological Argument In his "Essay on the Trinity" (and private notebooks and public sermons), Jonathan Edwards suggested a form of ontological argument for each of the three persons of the Trinity. Anselm's argument starts from a definition of a hypothetical God who perfects all excellences and proceeds to show God must actually exist ...


9

In Trinitarian thought, God has one will and one action. Everything is accomplished by the Three Persons of the Trinity acting in unity. This applies to creation as well. The typical language is along the lines of 'The Father created through the Son in the Spirit', but there is always an emphasis that the Three Persons act in unity. Concerning creation St ...


8

Personalities, possibly, but roles no. To say that God merely exists as one person filling three jobs (roles) or having three "faces" is a heresy known as modalism. The exact formulations are always contentious, and the truth is there is no satisfactory analogy, because there is no terrestrial equivalent. The tricky balance of the Trinity is to maintain ...


8

Divine Relations are depicted in green: (original image source) The Father is God. The Son is God. The Holy Spirit is God. Here, "is" means "has the same essence as." (cf. St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica I q. 39 a. 1 question "Whether in God the essence is the same as the person?") the Father is not the Son, the Son is not the Holy Spirit, the ...


8

A huge number of scriptures could be brought to bear as evidence for distinctions between the three persons of the godhead. I'll limit myself to following Louis Berkhof's treatment, which calls attention to several major ways that the persons are distinguished in Scripture. To him, at least, through these passages "the separate persons of the Trinity are ...


8

The Trinity declares that there is only the One Being of God. A Divine Being is not to be confused with a human being. Also, God is Spirit. Before Jesus came to earth to born as a human, he existed in heaven alongside God (the Father) and the Holy Spirit. John chapter 1 verses 1 to 3 and 14 explain it this way: In the beginning was the Word, and the ...


7

The Trinitarian position on this is pretty straight forward. Hard to wrap your mind around, maybe. A mystery, sure. But the same basic idea is held by most Trinitarians, especially Protestant and Catholic traditions. Eastern Orthodoxy comes at this from a rather different angle, but as far as application to that verse goes aren't fundamentally different. ...


7

Reformed theology maintains the full deity and personality of the Holy Spirit, so that there is no inferiority attached to the Holy Spirit that would result in the kind of subordination that the ‘Reformed House Church’ you mention makes in its statement of faith. What they claim seems to be but one step removed from ancient movements such as the ...


7

Anne's answer covered the reason WHY the Holy Spirit is full Deity in accordance with the Trinitarian doctrine, thus showing that the Holy Spirit is worthy of worship, which the true Reformed tradition should hold. To address your related question about praying to the Holy Spirit, I'll focus on the common practice (from the Reformed perspective) of how ...


6

The terms substance and person are (in the context of Trinitarian theology and Christology) Latin translations of the Greek terms ousia and hypostasis. The background from Greek philosophy. Plato and Aristotle were the ones who first formulated the terms ousia (substance or essence) and hypostasis (individual substance) in a philosophical sense. Plato did ...


6

Besides these three persons, no fourth in the divine nature can be asserted Says St. Thomas Aquinas. And why? Because of the "proceeds" The Three Persons of the Blessed Trinity are alike, except in their relation to one another These relations of origin one must understand not as a procession which inclines to what is without - for what proceeds ...


6

The following Ante-Nicene church fathers believed in Jesus as the eternal Son: 2nd century Irenaeus (AD. 120-200) said: "But the Son, eternally co-existing with the Father, from of old, yea, from the beginning, always reveals the Father to Angels, Archangels, Powers, Virtues..." (Against Heresies, Book II, ch. 30, section 9) Athenagoras ( A.D. 177)...


6

Is it appropriate to ascribe the title "Almighty" to Jesus Christ? Most certainly. Christ Himself declares "I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End," says the Lord, "who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty." (Revelation 1:8, NKJV). The author continues : I was in the Spirit on the Lord’s Day, and I heard behind me a loud ...


6

You ask how is 1 Corinthians 8:6 yet for us there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, through whom are all things, and through whom we live. to be understood with Trinitarian theology? In particular, you state "Paul is saying that the one being of God is shared only by the Father." Trinitarians have ...


6

The Protestant Trinitarian view of Jesus Christ is that he is the only-begotten Son of God – begotten, not made. JWs believe that there is no distinction between "begotten" and "made". Therefore, "begotten, not made" is meaningless for them. He is of one substance with the Father by whom all things were made. The word "of one substance" (homoousios) ...


6

What is the Catholic view of the Trinity and does it contain a feminine element? The Trinity is the term employed to signify the central doctrine of the Catholic religion, the truth that in the unity of the Godhead there are Three Persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, these Three Persons being truly distinct one from another. Catholics are ...


5

The Catholic Perspective I first ran across the word "spiration" in the discussion of the Holy Spirit's relation to the Trinity, found in Aquinas' Summa Theologica (First Part, Question 27). Aquinas has just finished talking first about God as an individual being, and then has begun discussing what it means for God to be a Trinity. He begins by talking ...


5

As it turns out, the Trinitarian nature of God is actually an axiom. In mathematics, an axiom is a statement that is taken to be true without a proof. For example, the statement that a straight line can be drawn between any two points is one of the five axioms that comprise Euclid's Postulates. To most of us, this statement is obviously true, but it can't ...


5

First, lets look at the setting of the entire passage. Jesus was talking to Jewish leaders, and they were accusing him for his claims of equality with God (John 5: 17- 23). This verse has to be looked in a historical and cultural context. In the Jewish law, the testimony of a witness is not received in his own case, so these leaders would render his claim, ...


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