18

Calvinists indeed believe they can only make educated guesses about others; if someone you thought was saved falls away, the conclusion is they were never actually saved. But Calvinism teaches that "infallible assurance of faith" is available to believers about themselves. The Grounds of Assurance The Westminster Confession of Faith says in chapter 18: ...


15

It is problematic to spiritualize verses too quickly. Recall that the Proverbs were written by Jewish people living in the Jewish homeland of Israel under the Mosaic Covenant--not the New Covenant spoken of by Ezekiel and identified by Jesus at the Last Supper. This proverb is speaking about upright and wicked people living in the land of Israel at that ...


12

A baptized Catholic would understand "accepting Jesus" as meaning professing the (Catholic) Faith; he would interpret "repenting of one's sins" as receiving absolution from a priest in the sacrament of penance, and thus being in a state of grace (the state of not having the stain of mortal sin on his soul). If he were to die in a state of grace, he would ...


11

When looking at the overall context of all the warnings in Hebrews we have a situation for the unpardonable sin of fully rejecting Christ even under the sanctifying work and demonstrable power of the Holy Spirit making it absolute, thus unforgivable. It represents a full grown and stubborn unbelief in the face of a long season of powerful grace and the ...


11

Actually Catholics would have to assent to the statement that "once saved, [one is] always saved" (I'll refer to this belief as "OSAS" for short). The difference is in when Catholics believe one is saved. The Evangelical Protestants whom you refer to generally seem to believe that one is saved once one deliberately turns to God and accepts Jesus as Lord and ...


10

As expected, "once saved, always saved" advocates (I'll use "reformed" as shorthand for this) generally agree that both the second and third types of soil represent people who were never saved. Broadly speaking, they make these points: The four soils represent four types of people or hearts: the unresponsive, the impulsive, the ...


8

In paragraph 480 of St. Thomas Aquinas' Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews, he explains that the way sacrifice was done in the past was to wipe out past sins. The people sinned, and then a priest offered an animal sacrifice in reparation for those sins. This verse states that by Christ's one sacrifice, past and future sins are being accounted for, thus ...


7

It depends what you mean by "once saved, always saved" (OSAS). That is usually a catch phrase of the Free Grace brand of evangelicals (Zane Hodges, Charles Stanley, et al.). That sort of doctrine is refuted better with regard to a James 2-type argument that true faith necessarily results in good works. The other brand of evangelicals that OSAS might ...


6

Paul Kretzmann, the son of a Lutheran pastor, wrote his Popular Commentary of the Bible, which "has been a favorite among confessional Lutherans since publication of the first volume in 1921." In his comments on Hebrews 6, he called attention to the characteristics of the one who is spoken of in the passage: they were once enlightened, tasted of ...


6

Let's compare what Paul said in the Greek with a consideration of the doctrine of perseverance, in light of what several commentators taught on 1 Corinthians 9:27. "Adokimos" The word in 1Co 9:27 that is commonly translated as "disqualified" is "adokimos" (ἀδόκιμος) in the Greek (Strongs G96), and was normally used to refer to adulterated currencies, ...


6

Calvinism relies heavily on the following statement: Grace (specifically the grace provided via Christ's death) is sufficient for the salvation of all, but it is efficient for the salvation of some. This is essentially all that stands between Calvinism and Universalism. The idea behind Calvinism is that Christ's grace is so powerful that if one is ...


6

To briefly summarize, in Calvinism, the central point of the doctrine of the "perseverance of the saints" is that those whom God has saved can never permanently fall away. Some implications flow from this idea, such as the view that a Christian can (but might not) have assurance of his or her own salvation. But the core of the doctrine is that ...


6

Within that sentence are two statements. The first is that the Father (who is the vine-dresser) will take away the branch that does not bear fruit. The second is that the Father will prune the branch that does bear fruit so that it may bear more fruit. If this parable was the only place in the New Testament to address the issue of eternal security, then ...


5

(I know the question says good answers will have references from published commentaries; I may look for some later when I get the chance to go to my college library, but for now this answer will be my explanation of the kind of perspective I have heard.) Those who believe in the perseverance (or preservation) of the saints or eternal security of salvation, ...


5

There is a few things to consider in order for the answer to make sense: We have multiple opportunities while we are alive to repent, be forgiven, fall into sin, learn from our mistakes, repent again, and so on. We are basically building christian character and receiving grace to help us in our journey to heaven. It is not a one time deal. We die one time. ...


5

The sin referred to is not sin in general, but going back to animal sacrifices, after the ultimate sacrifice of Christ on the cross. See earlier in the chapter, as to what the Jewish priests were continuing to do. If Christ’s sacrifice were not sufficient, then “there is no sacrifice left for sin. “ If one has received Christ, he has, in effect, made his ...


5

The whole vine analogy loses a lot when separated by centuries of non-agricultural life. This is not primarily a scientific description of salvation but a spiritual description of the kingdom of heaven. A vine has branches that bud and bear not just leaves but fruit also and it has other branches that bear leaves only. These are colloquially called '...


4

The passage is not talking about regular sins but in Matthew Henry's words it is talking about a total and final falling away. Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary The sin here mentioned is a total and final falling away, when men, with a full and fixed will and resolution, despise and reject Christ, the only Saviour; despise and resist the Spirit, the only ...


4

In answer to your question; (note) all Scripture is quoted from the King James translation. The key word in: Hebrews 10:26 For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, is the word truth. John 14:6 Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man ...


4

I know this is late but I will try to answer. No, there is no predominant belief among Advent Christian Churches as to perseverance of the saints. This is strange because even though the majority of the pastors attended the same college, taught by the same professors, it never really filtered to the churches they served right out of college. Now that the ...


4

Because although Christians cannot lose their salvation, they can still appear before the Lord in shame rather than in confidence (1 John 2:28). The good shepherds who watch over the flock want them to enter into the best the Lord has for them, and not be "scarcely saved" (1 Peter 4:17-18). Not all Christians will inherit a crown and rule with Christ; that ...


3

Five-pointer Calvinists know that they are saved.1 John 5:13 says we may know that we have eternal life because of the assurance that we have in the written word. 1 John 5:13(ESV) 13 I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God that you may know that you have eternal life. Furthermore, Calvinists believe that it is faith ...


3

From the point-of-view of someone who belives in the Doctrines of Grace The doctrine of Perseverance of Saints as defined in the link you provided Perseverance of the saints is the Calvinist doctrine that those who are truly saved will persevere to the end and cannot lose their salvation. It doesn't mean that a person who is truly saved will never ...


3

The answer to Paul's question : Shall the weak brother perish ? (I Corinthians 8:11 - KJV - απολειται ο ασθενων αδελφος) is ... no he shall not perish. The reason that the weak brother will not perish is : ... for whom Christ died. (I Corinthians 8:11 - KJV - δι ον χριστος απεθανεν) The brother will not perish (or 'be destroyed') because Christ died ...


3

There are two common approaches to dealing with this challenge. I'll quote from Calvinists Robert Reymond for the first, and Charles Hodge for the second. That "ruin" (apollymi) here does not mean being ultimately lost That the conditional language is a warning that God uses as a means to secure his promise of protecting the elect Contextual ...


3

What the parable teaches Jesus's parables are not comprehensive systematic theology lectures. They teach particular things through analogies but without telling the whole story. What this parable teaches us is: That our sin is like a zillion dollar debt that we owe to God. It is so immense we can hardly put a number to it, and there is no possible payment ...


3

Just the idea of remaining should clarify that a person can be once there on the vine but be pruned off, because they themselves rejected what they formerly had and didn't produce fruit. Matthew 7:22-23 seems to say clearly that even people who call Jesus Lord Lord, and who cast out demons in his name and do miracles in his name are not recognized as ...


2

I've heard Hebrews 6:6 explained by Dr. David L. Allen. He has written extensively on Atonement. Summarizing points below: To the Calvinist Hebrews 6:6 refers to the false convert; to the Arminian it’s to the apostate. Dr. Allens argues it is neither. Context: The end of Hebrews 5 defines it being directed to believers in infancy, and Hebrews 6 starts with ...


2

Nondenominational Doctrine Hebrews 10:26 NET For if we deliberately keep on sinning after receiving the knowledge of the truth, no further sacrifice for sins is left for us Mark 3:29 NET But whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will never be forgiven, but is guilty of an eternal sin Hebrews 6:6 NET and then have committed apostasy, to renew them ...


2

To those who believe in the perseverance of the saints, "keeping watch over your souls" does not imply "preventing your soul from falling into eternal damnation." Matthew Henry interprets the phrase this way: They are to watch against every thing that may be hurtful to the souls of men, and to give them warning of dangerous errors, of the devices of Satan,...


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