19

Countries which ban the possession of the bible include: Saudi Arabia At present, the Bible has been banned in Saudi Arabia. In a number of countries, bible translation, distribution, sale or promotion is prohibited or made difficult, and the Bible may be considered extremist materials. Historically, some countries banned the Bible in certain languages ...


18

No, there is no reliable historical evidence to support such a claim. Before going into the question significantly, I should point out that the number of Baptists killed by the Catholic Church depends on how one defines "Baptist" - apparently, there are some who consider any early sect of Christianity which did not practice infant baptism to be a "proto-...


18

The clear and correct answer is simply: God's will. God ensured that it happened. Now, suppose one rephrased the question as: how could one explain the survival of Christianity in purely athiest terms -- with no mention of God whatsoever -- what is the closest approximation one could do? Measuring love in units of sacrifice. There's something ...


11

Depends on the colony - Maryland was most assuredly a refuge for Catholics. Pennsylvania was explicitly for Quakers under William Penn. Massachusetts was founded by Puritans & Baptists who had already escaped once to Holland. The Mayflower Compact (linked above) was an explicitly religious document signed by members of a wayward sect who trying to get ...


10

I am one of Jehovah's Witnesses. Jehovah's Witnesses have not published any comment on a particular religious organization being behind the court cases. They are much more concerned about the outcome of the cases happening at present. Religious persecution is not new, and is rather seen as a sign of the Great Tribulation. There have been many interviews ...


10

This article lists six countries where owning a bible is 'dangerous' : Six Countries . . . The six countries listed are North Korea, Somalia, Maldives, Morocco, Libya and Uzbekistan. Of the list - North Korea, Libya and Uzbekistan are the most intolerant. China is, in fact, 'imprisoning' people for their religious, or cultural, beliefs as reported by ...


9

This is an important question. While we today decisively reject the terrible things that people in the past thought and did, we should not shy away from recognizing what they did and why. And as Christians we must be honest about the role of religion and the church. The "Middle Ages" covers a thousand years and the whole of Europe - and Jewish life varied ...


9

Yes it is. Open Door lists Afghanistan as the 4th 'worst' place in the world for Christian persecution. While the population of Christians there is small relative to the total population, the persecution is still listed as 'extreme'.


8

To be clear, the Church Fathers were specifically against rebellion. This being said however, some Church Fathers have in fact rather bluntly suggested that the affairs of the state and the power struggle involved in such activity is often times contrary to the Christian faith. Tertullian I owe no duty to the forum, the election-ground, or the senate-...


7

There are a number of reasons Christianity survived in the face of persecution. First, Christianity began at a time when the Romans were working to make it easy to travel throughout the Mediterranean, in order to facilitate management of their growing empire. Paul and other early missionaries were therefore able to spread the gospel faster than any religion ...


6

I think you've missed some key points in your imagined scenario. It wasn't "a simple message of love" spread by a few ordinary fisherman. Jesus wasn't some hippie revolutionary who got a bunch of followers to parade around telling everybody they should just love each other. What made Christianity appealing was that it was true. This would have been much ...


6

It's difficult to give a definitive answer because of the ambiguity of words like "heretic" and "persecute". I presume that if Mr X says to Mr Y, "No, I disagree with you", that's not persecution. If he has him tortured and killed over the disagreement, that pretty clearly is persecution. But there's a wide range in the middle. If X tells people that Y is a ...


4

Short Answer = Faith. Long Answer = History Why did it Thrive? From a secular perspective, the history of the church is highly correlated with the success of Western Europe. What follows is drawn highly from A World History of Christianity by Adrian Hastings. Around the time of Charlemange, for example, Christianity was the primary religion in only a ...


4

"Not technically." The Russian Orthodox Church is involved with a subgroup called "Committee for the Salvation of Youth from Totalitarian Cults (“the Salvation Committee”) that's been filing complaints to prohibit the JW's from exercising their religion since 1995. The case was dismissed, and reopened 4 times in just 2 years when the 4th investigator noted ...


4

I think most commentators have understood "terror to good conduct" a little differently than you are understanding it. The phrase is φόβος τῷ ἀγαθῷ ἔργῳ (phobos tō agathō ergō) — literally, "fear [to] the good work". This is nonsensical English, so the ESV has used "terror", which works. I think the idea they intend convey, though, is made more ...


4

Russia (w.r.t. non-mainstream Christianity) The particular incident that comes to mind is the recent (2019-Sep-2) conviction of Valeriy Moskalenko, who was detained for public reading of the Bible (limited resources in English - https://jw-russia.org/en/news/19090214-1115.html is very brief description, the rest is in Russian). However, it seems that it's ...


3

You are roughly correct, but with a condition I'll highlight later. When you are beaten, stolen, poisoned, and the world reviles you, you have less and less that is in between you and God. It's very evident that the more gifts, accolades, status, riches one has of the world, they only serve to distance that person from God since it reinforces the notion ...


3

North Korea has severe restrictions against Christianity as state policy, with imprisonment and forced labour the penalty for even being a committed Christian, but not only Christians face persecution. Margaret Stutley reports, in Shamanism that North Korean persecution of shamanism has caused the religion to go underground. China has placed some ...


3

The church Father's seems to have less inclination to political protest or civil disobedience as compared to modern society while at the same time, where it really mattered, were more willing to die for the fundamentals of religion. The case seems similar to Daniel in the Lions den, or that of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego in Daniel Chapter 3. For example ...


3

All official statements of the Vatican from 1909 to the present are recorded in the Acta Apostolicae Sedis (AAS). Performing the following Google search on the PDFs of the AAS volumes: Ustaše OR Ustashe OR Ustashas OR Ustashi OR Ustaša inurl:http://www.vatican.va/archive/aas/documents/ reveals that the AAS volumes have not mentioned the Ustaše. See also ...


3

The responses of Christians under persecution are akin to individual experiences that we often come across in our life, when we pass through troubles and hardships. In many instances around the world, Christianity has become more deeply rooted in the hearts of its followers under persecution than in prospering and commanding times. Rather Christians tend ...


3

No. Christians who live under the authority of a government that outlaws Christianity would not be resisting God by refusing to abandon their faith. One might imagine that the right thing to do is to obey such laws, perhaps crossing the border to go to church. This is not the case. Authority exercised against the common good is authority that has broken down ...


2

Open persecution: There is considerable evidence that while the Christians did suffer occasional persecution, particularly around 250 and in the Great Persecution of 303-311, Christian tradition seems to have exaggerated the extent of such persecution. Richard Holland sees the accusations laid against Emperor Nero to be far fetched, saying in Nero: The Man ...


2

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King (a Christian pastor) had to face just this sort of quandry - what do with an unjust law. In the question posed above, the unjust law would be to not worship God. In the case of the Civil Rights Era, it was to comply with laws that explicit deviated from what God told the prophets. In what in this situation that he wrote ...


2

It does seem unlikely, that number is supposed to be representative of a period of about 1,200 years, but even over that period of time you'd still have to kill at least 114 baptists a day to reach that number. There's always a high estimate and a low estimate when calculating casualties, my initial assumption is that 50 million is the high estimate, and may ...


2

Let Case 1 = the suicide for women at the point of being raped and Case 2 = the suicide of a father and his family to avoid seeing the mother/wife and the daughters/sisters raped and dishonored before their eyes The two situations are not the same. In case 1, the woman has an extra case of conscience of commiting fornication and cooperating to the sin of ...


2

Your question starts with a couple of assumptions that don't hold up. First, the earliest Christians had plenty of heated disagreements, starting with doctrinal conflicts over the extent to which the Law of Moses was binding (or not) on Gentile believers. Chapter 15 of Acts, and the whole of Paul's letter to the church at Galatia, record those issues. ...


2

They sang "The Twelve Days of Christmas" as an expression of faith and quite openly! In 1870, the song of The Twelve Days of Christmas was first published in England, shortly after the time when it was a criminal act to practice the Catholic faith. According to the Tridentine Mass of Pope Pius V (1570), the Christmas season lasted from the Solemnity of the ...


1

The Catholic Church believes that those who truly follow Christ will encounter all manners of hardship and persecution, but that persecution is not simply for persecution's sake; it is instead an effect of Original Sin and its effects upon the world: because true disciples fight for justice and right, those who hate justice will hate its bearers. See John 3:...


1

The History of Romanism by John Dowling published in 1845 is where the statistic probably comes from as it's pretty much a verbatim claim. Unfortunately, the footnotes on page 542 say that: No amount of computation can reach the number -History of Romanism Page 542 - footnote#1


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible