12

Two fourth-century fathers clearly make this connection. First, Cyril of Jerusalem: The multitude of the hearers was confounded;—it was a second confusion, in the room of that first evil one at Babylon. For in that confusion of tongues there was division of purpose, because their thought was at enmity with God; but here minds were restored and united, ...


5

Pentecost, for Christians, marks the birth of "the Church." For evangelicals, however, church history generally means when their local congregation was founded. As a body of believers with no history, by design, historical holidays (I.e. Anything not explicitly about Jesus) fall to the wayside. From an historic viewpoint, the Church Universal is an amazing ...


5

There are two competing views. This is why "charismatic" denominations are seen as in contrast to "traditional" denominations (called "cessationist" by others). The charismatic view has been described in other answers and refers to scriptures such as 1 Corinthians 14 and 1 Corinthians 12 as directed at all believers and exhorting them to desire and exercise ...


5

The Wikipedia article you link to actually gives a clear explanation: quoting from the Roman Calendar, "so that it would harmonize better with the Gospel story." From 1389, when the feast was first made universal in the Western Church, until 1969 when the most recent edit was made to the Roman Calendar, the feast was held on July 2. This is exactly 1 week (...


5

The meaning of John 20:22 is clear in its context: 19 On the evening of that first day of the week, when the disciples were together, with the doors locked for fear of the Jewish leaders, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you!” 20 After he said this, he showed them his hands and side. The disciples were overjoyed when they saw the ...


4

How a Christian chooses to reconcile these passages depends a lot on your view of the Holy Spirit and His role in our lives. With the reservation that different groups and denominations interpret this differently, these study notes make a good case for John 20:22 being symbolic - an "acted parable" that was fulfilled at Pentecost. I would also add that the ...


4

Generally speaking you are correct but I would not say people left their own denominations to join the Pentecostal church, rather like all new denominations just some of the initial founders did, but as it grew it became its own proper denomination with its majority being its own converts.  It is interesting to look at the Holy Spirit under the heads that ...


4

The Pentecost festival was the end of the Festival of Weeks. A few things may help here: The Festival of weeks itself was a several week affair that celebrated the entire harvest. It began when the barley was ready, and ended with the wheat. As such, it was a season - but the highest day thereof was the single day of Pentecost. As a harvest festival, the ...


2

The Azusa Street Revival from 1906-1915 is almost universally accepted amongst Pentecostals to be the event in which the Holy Spirit revisited the church with the charismatic gifts of the early one. This included tongues.


2

I'd say...no. Although some might want you to think that :-) Firstly, to clarify, I'm talking here about supernatural gifts rather than spiritual gifts. I don't know any Christian that wouldn't recognize more 'natural' gifts like having a gift in teaching. Reformed Christians don't necessarily believe in the cessation of supernatural gifts, although they ...


2

Did Mary lay her hands on all the Apostles in the Upper Room to pour out the Holy Spirit? The short answer is no. Neither Scripture nor Sacred Tradition or the teaching magisterium of the Church tell us that Mary did such a thing. Not even private revelations agree with this. Here is how it transpired according to Acts 2: 1-13: 1When the time for ...


2

From Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.'s The Three Ages of the Spiritual Life, part I, article IV, "The Seven Gifts of the Holy Ghost" (fn. 39), the relationship between the gifts of the Holy Ghost and the beatitudes, based on St. Thomas Aquinas's doctrine: Gift of Wisdom → Peacemakers (IIa IIae, q.45, a.6): "it gives peace and allows the soul possessing it to give ...


2

Why does the Eastern Orthodox Church call the 49 days following Easter, Pentecost and the Western Church does not? To put it in a nutshell: It is their tradition to do so. The Eastern Orthodox Church calls this the Season of Pentecost because there are 50 (Pente) days between Easter and Pentecost. It is that simple. The Christian holy day of Pentecost, ...


1

The time between Easter and Pentecost is called Eastertide (or Season of Easter) in most Western churches. Western churches also refer to the Season of Pentecost to mean the time after Pentecost.


1

In 1969 the Feast of the Visitation was moved from July 2 to May 31. I do not desire to repeat the excellent comments in Matt Gutting's answer, so I will simply add a few points or tidbits of my own to this question. The idea of May 31 as a date for the Feast of the Visitation is an excellent way for the Church to conclude the month of May which is ...


1

When did Jesus send the Holy Spirit? We find various ministries of the Holy Spirit. The Spirit was involved in creation. Genesis 1:2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. The Spirit would fill people to accomplish a task. Exodus 31:3 And I ...


1

The only group I am aware of who see speaking in tongues as necessary to salvation are the United Pentecostal Churches, which teach some other doctrines most Christians would disagree with. For example, they are deny the Trinity and teach that there is only one person in the Godhead who appears in different forms at different times, whereas the Trinity ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible