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I think it's necessary to separate this question into two parts: Why did Judas need to lead the mob to Jesus? and Why did Judas need to kiss Jesus to identify him? I will attempt to answer the first question. Some possible explanations for the second question can be found here: https://hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/16864/why-did-judas-betray-...


10

The tradition of palm branches on Palm Sunday actually originates with the Jewish festival of Sukkoth, also called the Festival of the Tabernacles or Booths, which was probably the most popular holiday among the Jews in the first century. In the observance of Sukkoth, worshippers processed through Jerusalem and in the Temple, waving in their right hands ...


10

Here are some things to help clarify this situation. First, "his disciples" does not always refer to the Twelve. It can refer to a much larger number, including "the seventy" who Jesus sends out to spread the message. Matthew in particular usually refers to "The Twelve" or "the Apostles" when he is talking about the smaller group and "the disciples" can ...


10

For the civil trial, Luke's account gives the most detail about the charges, Luke 23:2 (NIV): And they began to accuse him, saying "We have found this man subverting our nation. He opposes payment of taxes to Caesar and claims to be Christ, a king." and Luke 23:5 (NIV): But they insisted, "He stirs up the people all over Judea by his teaching. He ...


10

In short, no. Pilate had a choice. In Jesus' conversation with him, He says this: Jesus answered, “You would have no power over me if it were not given to you from above. Therefore the one who handed me over to you is guilty of a greater sin.” John 19:11 ESV The Jewish religious leaders--not all Jews--were guilty of a greater sin than Pilate, even ...


10

Did he literally bleed through his pores as could be interpreted from this verse? Yes. This condition is called Hematidrosis. What would cause him to sweat blood during a prayer to his Father? Hematidrosis may occur when a person is suffering extreme levels of stress; for example, facing his or her own death. What is the spiritual meaning behind this ...


10

We can identify several views regarding the suffering of Jesus. (1) That he did feel fear and grief, but did not sin. (2) That he did not feel fear, per se, but did feel grief. Within (2), there are differing understandings of why Jesus felt grief and agony. Those who (a) accept penal substitution will argue that he was suffering on behalf of his people, ...


10

There seems to be two views on what the letters "RNIO" mean in the Carlos Crivelli painting. I only have one reference for the answer: Dr. Liliana Leopardi, an expert in Italian Renaissance art, Assistant Professor of Art and Art History at Chapman University, who was gracious enough to share her knowledge with me through personal correspondence. Scholars ...


7

Bible tells that as soon as Jesus was arrested, all His disciples fled and went into hiding. So there was this possibility that whoever known to be close to Jesus would be arrested or tried like Jesus. Matt. 26:56 But this has happened so that the scriptures of the prophets would be fulfilled.” Then all the disciples left him and fled. So there could be ...


7

Of course Pilate is not portrayed as a Christian, or even a good man, let alone a saint. However, nearly all bible commentators agree that Pilate was trying to avoid crucifying Christ. Undoubtedly it was political pressure from the Jewish leaders that forced his hand against his own will. First Pilate really did not care about the silly religious ...


7

It's important to remember that just a few days earlier, Jesus had warned his disciples: Matthew 18: 7: Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh! Yes, having Jesus be betrayed and killed was part of the plan, but that does not mean that the specific persons who ...


7

There wasn't really one, there were just a few supposed reasons. The certain Jews who wanted to see him executed claimed it was for blasphemy in making himself out to be God, or alternatively for supposing him to have violated the Sabbath. Yet the rulers of the Jews only had derivative powers granted by the Romans and didn't have the authority to actually ...


6

Luke 23:27-31 tells us that certain women lamented as Jesus carried his cross to Golgotha. At this stage, there is no mention of Veronica or of anyone wiping Jesus' face. The apocryphal Acts of Pilate (an extant copy of which is contained in the Gospel of Nicodemus, dated at around the fourth century, expanded on Luke's brief passage, saying that one of ...


6

It was some sort of potion designed to dull the senses and lessen the suffering of those being executed. Biblehub contains several commentaries on this verse. One from Ellicott’s commentary reads in part: It was clearly something at once nauseous and narcotic, given by the merciful to dull the pain of execution, and mixed with the sour wine of the ...


5

Yes Pilate carried out God's plans but his actions were still sinful. In Acts 2:23 Peter explained that the crucifixion was God's plan carried out by the Jewish and Gentile leaders: But God knew what would happen, and his prearranged plan was carried out when Jesus was betrayed. With the help of lawless Gentiles, you nailed him to a cross and killed him. (...


5

John's account of Pilate's questioning of Jesus is more detailed: in Matthew it's given only four verses, 27:11-14, but in John it's given nine verses, 18:33-38, 19:9-11. In both gospels Jesus responds to Pilate's question of whether Jesus is the king of the Jews: Matthew 27:11 and John 18:34-37. And in both gospels Jesus is later silent when Pilate ...


5

I like the answer posted by Kris very much, but would add that the early believers also saw this verse as a prophetic foreshadowing of the vinegar and gall on the cross. Psalm 69:21 KJ21 They gave me also gall for my meat, and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.


4

Jesus is equally God while still not God the father as well as not being God the Holy Spirit. They are three separate entities that all form the single God-head. John's gospels shows this to us. "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things were made through Him, and ...


4

The Gospel of Luke answers this question for us: Pilate then called together the chief priests and the rulers and the people, 14 and said to them, “You brought me this man as one who was misleading the people. And after examining him before you, behold, I did not find this man guilty of any of your charges against him. 15 Neither did Herod, for he sent ...


4

The charge against Jesus was that of blasphemy- according to the Pharisees, Jesus himself was claiming to be God. Matthew 26 records the "trial" in the Jewish Court 57 Those who had arrested Jesus took him to Caiaphas the high priest, where the teachers of the law and the elders had assembled. 58 But Peter followed him at a distance, right up to ...


4

This is not seen as a miracle - but rather an acceptance of the choice they were asked to make. The Torah specifically disallows children to be punished for the sins of the father - Dt 24:16, so this is nothing but bravado. In responding "his blood be upon us," they are, in actuality just saying, "there will be no consequence." When he is being martyred (...


4

I recently heard a remarkable interpretation of the symbolic significance. The crown of thorns needs to be viewed in a Roman military context: from Wikipedia: The grass crown (Latin: corona obsidionalis or corona graminea), was the highest and rarest of all military decorations. It was presented only to a general or commander who broke the blockade of a ...


4

All the events are reported to have taken place in Jerusalem - there is no need incorporate a journey from Galilee to Jerusalem in to the required timetable. Perhaps your confusion is in regard to the involvement of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee whom Jesus was sent to; however: 6 On hearing this, Pilate asked if the man was a Galilean. 7 When he ...


3

I suspect not. For two reasons: The "goat upon which the Lord's lot fell" was still used as an offering. Barabbas was simply released. It makes more sense that Jesus is the type both of the sin offering and the scapegoat -- especially given how repetitively the sacrificial system prefigured the Messiah in many other aspects. This repeating imagery amounts ...


3

Keep in mind that this event coincided with the Passover. There would have been many people in Jerusalem. Finding one person was not an easy task. There also would have been many rabbis, each with dozens of followers/disciples. Even if the Jewish leaders what Jesus looked like, and where he was (and how could they know his precise location without some ...


3

John Shelby Spong says in Jesus for the NonReligious, page 168, that in his research, he has been able to find no evidence that there was a custom of releasing a prisoner at the time of the Passover. He says the original crucifixion story could have been related to Yom Kippur because in this tradition, one lamb or goat was killed for our sins and one had ...


3

There seems to be two distinct issues here. One is that the claim that Jesus' death was for the sins of all men. The other is related to the sense in which all men may have participated in the killing of Christ. Universal atoning work of Christ The atoning work of Christ was universal, in that it applied, at least in some way, to all men. There is still some ...


2

I have heard from several old parishioners at my Roman Catholic church that St. James (the greater) was so visually similar to his cousin Jesus that only people very close to them could tell the difference between the two, and thus the kiss of Judas was necessary to identify the correct man. I can't find any corroborating sources online, but I've heard this ...


2

We don't yet know. Even if God used Pilate as an instrument in his plan of salvation, we don't know enough details about the rest of Pilate's life. Whatever else he might have done or not done, if he truly repented before his death, he would have gone to heaven; if he did not repent, he would not have.


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