10

As expected, "once saved, always saved" advocates (I'll use "reformed" as shorthand for this) generally agree that both the second and third types of soil represent people who were never saved. Broadly speaking, they make these points: The four soils represent four types of people or hearts: the unresponsive, the impulsive, the ...


7

Narnian's answer covers well the argument for this story being real and not a parable. I will attempt to cover the argument that it is a parable. The first thing to note is the parable's location among other parables and teachings. Luke 16, where the parable is found, is surrounded by other parables and teachings. It is not part of the historic sections of ...


7

There are a number of views on these brothers and the specific meaning of this passage. We'll try to focus on just the brothers and not the passage, which has a long standing debate around whether it is even a parable or an actual account. First, we shouldn't be focused on there being five brothers. There are six. The man in torment has five brothers, ...


6

James E. Talmage discusses this in his book "Jesus the Christ" (read online here) An excerpt from this chapter: To the chosen and devoted followers who came asking the Master why He had changed from direct exposition to parables, He explained that while it was their privilege to receive and understand the deeper truths of the gospel, “the ...


6

While it is impossible to account for all OSAS interpretations of of the passage, the most obvious answer is that the unwise virgins were not saved. Remember that certain (purported) proponents of OSAS allow that someone can be (self) deceived about their status as one of the elect. Consider what Calvin wrote: Experience shows that the reprobate are ...


6

Oh, dear! Once we realise that this parable is about the coming kingdom of God, whose King is Christ Jesus, then any suggestion that “the king was angry and greedy” should ring spiritual alarm bells! The parable contains warnings that Christians should heed, but trying to “soft-pedal” the message simply detracts from the reality that if we claim to be ...


5

Jesus' message is a pretty simple one, although we can glean a deeper lesson from it by paying attention to every word in his message. In modern parlance, Jesus' message could be paraphrased, loosely, as follows: Get your own act together before criticizing someone else. A mote is a speck of dust. A beam is a log or a piece of lumber used in constructing ...


5

(I know the question says good answers will have references from published commentaries; I may look for some later when I get the chance to go to my college library, but for now this answer will be my explanation of the kind of perspective I have heard.) Those who believe in the perseverance (or preservation) of the saints or eternal security of salvation, ...


5

The brother's harsh remark betrayed that he had the spirit of a hireling, rather than that of a son. His service for the father was not one motivated by love, but rather by the promise of reward. Even though he had not gone into great excesses like the younger brother, his failure to show the same concern for his lost brother as the father did showed that he ...


5

The parables of Jesus do not 'communicate the inspired word of God'. They, themselves are the inspired word of God. For God - that is to say the Son of God - actually spoke them on earth from his own lips. If when one hears (or reads) the parable, if one does not perceive and hear God speaking to one's own soul then there is an explanation : Jesus said : ...


4

They are only available by grace, which is why Jesus asked us to purchase it from Him. The fact that it is free grace does not mean it does not require cooperation from us. If we take the parable of the man who sold all to purchase a field where he believed the treasure was, likewise we should do similarly spiritually - to forsaken our attachment to the ...


4

John Calvin in his commentary on Matthew encourages us to not get bogged down in the minutia of the parables. However, he essentially equates the oil to zeal. Some people give themselves a good deal of uneasiness about the lamps, the vessels, and the oil; but the plain and natural meaning of the whole is, that it is not enough to have ardent zeal for a ...


3

It's generally interpreted as a warning about the unexpected suddeness of the Lord's return. Just as you cannot know when you might be robbed, you also cannot know when the Second Coming will occur. Compare 1 Thessalonians 5 for a parallel warning by Paul. We can note that Paul compares "the Day of the Lord" (and not Jesus Himself) to the thief in the ...


3

The defining characteristic about the path is that it is hard, like a sidewalk or road. People represented by the path are hard-hearted. Their hearts are not receptive to the word. They are the people described by Paul in 1 Corinthians 1-3. 1 Corinthians 2:14 (NASB) But a natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are ...


3

"Great Faith" is earned through lessons and hard work Jesus was teaching them to do their duty first before they could start doing great things on their own. You cannot have great faith in a short time. It is through mistakes, trials, temptations and experience that faith is earned. It take years of experience in ministry that a man of God can have strong ...


3

Increase our Faith! = Make it Easier! (or Lighten the Burden!) Just before the parable, Jesus says (paraphrasing, for brevity) Don't be a stumbling block...or else! Rebuke and forgive your brothers. Forgive a brother even if he continually sins against you. The disciples' response is, "Increase our faith!" (πιστις 4102, "trust" "belief" "conviction") It ...


3

The Kingdom of God is NOT EXACTLY a place in every parable that has this line. It is the reign or kingship of God, God who rules, rather than a place where God rules. The Parable of the Mustard Seed signifies the kingdom/reign of God's sudden and surprising transformation from its almost invisible beginning to its full grandeur. It's described to be dynamic ...


3

Context is important. Matthew 7:1-6 ESV Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out ...


3

We normally think of "parable" as referring to a fictional analogical story. But the Greek word παραβολή has a broader meaning than this. BDAG gives this definition: someth. that serves as a model or example pointing beyond itself for later realization, type, figure a narrative or saying of varying length, designed to illustrate a truth especially ...


3

One more point in favor of the story being a parable, aside from those above, is that it contains internal self-interpretations which are unlikely in a straightforward recounting, but perfectly sensible as one of Jesus' self-interpreting parables (other examples are the Wedding Feast and the King's Far Journey, but the other parables in Luke 15-16 are also ...


3

The history of salt is actually very interesting. A deeper study of the subject perhaps not fitting for this format is definitely justified. I will however provide a brief summery. Salt is History has had many influences, not just in biblical history but also through out the entire world. It was one of the first industries; roads were called Salt Roads. ...


3

Being brought up in a Protestant, Evangelical church, I found myself in Sunday school from age six. I remember one of my teachers, Mrs. Valcore, telling me that a parable is an "earthly story with a heavenly meaning." That's a decent definition, to be sure, but there's more to it than that. Skip forward about 50 years, and in a Sunday school class ...


3

Matthew 25:1-13 is not about the Christian belief in once-saved always saved. The Lord says to the foolish virgins upon their return for admittance ‘I know you not’. The verb (to know) is in the perfect tense, which means the action (not knowing) was completed in the past and still is. The fools were never known, never saved in the first place to somehow ...


3

To understand the link between fasting and the parables Jesus gave in answer in Mark 2:18-22 (ESV), we need to note that the Mosaic Law prescribed only one fast on the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 16:29, 31). However, the legalistic Pharisees and the disciples of John the Baptist were following the traditions of men. Now John’s disciples and the Pharisees ...


3

What the parable teaches Jesus's parables are not comprehensive systematic theology lectures. They teach particular things through analogies but without telling the whole story. What this parable teaches us is: That our sin is like a zillion dollar debt that we owe to God. It is so immense we can hardly put a number to it, and there is no possible payment ...


3

1. Reading the Gospels as Protestants This verse from the Aramaic scriptures tells us the virgins (we, Christians) will meet both the bridegroom and bride. A few things here: firstly only a very small number of Protestants would accept Aramaic-primacy. It also doesn't have any relevance to this question. Just because the Greek text doesn't include "...


3

The disciples ask Jesus a similar question: The disciples came to him and asked, “Why do you speak to the people in parables?” [Matthew 13:10 (NIV)] Jesus' answer is that it clearly divides the listeners into two groups: those who are willing to listen, and those who are not. 11 He replied, “Because the knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of ...


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