12

The common Christian answer goes straight to the words Jesus spoke in John 8:58 Jesus said to them, "Most assuredly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I AM." This is understood now, and was understood at the time, as Jesus claiming to be God, referring to the the words God spoke to Moses from the burning bush. This is covered in much greater detail ...


11

This is a parable, so the fact that "a man of noble birth" is third person is rather irrelevant. It's pretty obvious he's symbolizing someone, probably Jesus. Context. Verse 11 reads: As they heard these things, he proceeded to tell a parable, because he was near to Jerusalem, and because they supposed that the kingdom of God was to appear immediately. I ...


10

As expected, "once saved, always saved" advocates (I'll use "reformed" as shorthand for this) generally agree that both the second and third types of soil represent people who were never saved. Broadly speaking, they make these points: The four soils represent four types of people or hearts: the unresponsive, the impulsive, the preoccupied, and the well-...


8

It's interesting that Jesus often ends the telling of a parable with the phrase "He who has ears to hear, let him hear." (Matthew 11:15, 13:9, 43; Mark 4:9, 23; Luke 8:8) During Jesus' life and ministry, much of Jesus' teaching was, indeed, veiled, but only to those who did not have ears to hear. Perhaps those who really wanted to follow Jesus would ...


7

One thing that seems to distinguish parables from accounts of actual events is the absence of specific names for the people in the parables. In the parables we read, "A sower" (Luke 8), "A rich man" (Luke 12, 15), "A man" (Luke 13, 14), "A Samaritan" (Luke 10). However, in the account of the Rich Man and the Beggar, we are actually given the name of the ...


6

Narnian's answer covers well the argument for this story being real and not a parable. I will attempt to cover the argument that it is a parable. The first thing to note is the parable's location among other parables and teachings. Luke 16, where the parable is found, is surrounded by other parables and teachings. It is not part of the historic sections of ...


6

James E. Talmage discusses this in his book "Jesus the Christ" (read online here) An excerpt from this chapter: To the chosen and devoted followers who came asking the Master why He had changed from direct exposition to parables, He explained that while it was their privilege to receive and understand the deeper truths of the gospel, “the mysteries of ...


6

While it is impossible to account for all OSAS interpretations of of the passage, the most obvious answer is that the unwise virgins were not saved. Remember that certain (purported) proponents of OSAS allow that someone can be (self) deceived about their status as one of the elect. Consider what Calvin wrote: Experience shows that the reprobate are ...


6

Oh, dear! Once we realise that this parable is about the coming kingdom of God, whose King is Christ Jesus, then any suggestion that “the king was angry and greedy” should ring spiritual alarm bells! The parable contains warnings that Christians should heed, but trying to “soft-pedal” the message simply detracts from the reality that if we claim to be ...


5

The basic idea is that when Jesus spoke in parables, they were great in drawing people with open hearts to him while driving those with hard hearts into deep confusion. Parables were a common mode of teaching among the Rabbis, but Christ used them in such a way that heaven shined down upon the most mundane every day practices of life. He also used them ...


5

First off I'd like to state that this is, in my opinion, clearly not a parable because the Bible does not state it as one like it does in these many citations: Matthew 13:18 Luke 6:39 Luke 12:16 Luke 15:3 Luke 18:1 Luke 18:9 Luke 19:11 If Jesus was speaking of reality then 'The End' had technically already come. Is this correct? So, to answer this ...


5

Christ's parables can be dangerous to interpret outside of the interpretation given in the context. In almost every case there is one thing taught in a parable and everything else is just filler. The term "parable" can be loosely translated "to throw alongside", the idea is that a story is thrown alongside a single truth. In this context the teaching is: ...


5

Well, for sure is never really possible, but let me give this a shot. There is no difference between the two words in Greek—just like the English translations you provided. Both use the generic Greek term for house, "oikos." However, it's important to note that the second quotation (Mt. 21) is itself a quotation from Isaiah 56:7. In Hebrew, the word for ...


5

This is my favourite summary of the parable: He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose.—Jim Elliot (October 28, 1949 journal entry) It refers to the pivotal verse: And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of unrighteous wealth, so that when it fails they may receive you into the eternal dwellings.&...


5

I would like to expand the short hint given by David Stratton on John 8:58 The Law of Moses(Torah) commands to stone to death anyone who misuse or blaspheme the Name of God. Leviticus 24:13-16 (NIV) Then the Lord said to Moses: “Take the blasphemer outside the camp. All those who heard him are to lay their hands on his head, and the entire assembly ...


5

Jesus' message is a pretty simple one, although we can glean a deeper lesson from it by paying attention to every word in his message. In modern parlance, Jesus' message could be paraphrased, loosely, as follows: Get your own act together before criticizing someone else. A mote is a speck of dust. A beam is a log or a piece of lumber used in constructing ...


5

(I know the question says good answers will have references from published commentaries; I may look for some later when I get the chance to go to my college library, but for now this answer will be my explanation of the kind of perspective I have heard.) Those who believe in the perseverance (or preservation) of the saints or eternal security of salvation, ...


5

The parables of Jesus do not 'communicate the inspired word of God'. They, themselves are the inspired word of God. For God - that is to say the Son of God - actually spoke them on earth from his own lips. If when one hears (or reads) the parable, if one does not perceive and hear God speaking to one's own soul then there is an explanation : Jesus said : ...


4

Wisdom is for the Humble Psalm 138:6 (NASB) For though the LORD is exalted, Yet He regards the lowly, But the haughty He knows from afar. Proverbs 3:34 (NASB) Though He scoffs at the scoffers, Yet He gives grace to the afflicted. (quoted in James 4:6 and 1 Peter 5:5) Matthew 11:24-30 (NASB) At that time Jesus said, "I praise You, Father, ...


4

Jesus is being sarcastic. Read this way, it is consistent with his other preachings. Notice: I tell you, use worldly wealth to gain friends for yourselves, so that when it is gone, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings. Read that sarcastically. In our current way of speaking, it might be something like: Go ahead, make friends with rich ...


4

Jesus was saying that the Kingdom of God has a huge effect on whatever it interacts with. That is, the effect is disproportionately large in comparison to what we mortals perceive the Kingdom of God to be. The Kingdom of God refers to more than just Heaven. The Kingdom of God also includes his people, many of whom are still here on Earth.


4

There are a number of views on these brothers and the specific meaning of this passage. We'll try to focus on just the brothers and not the passage, which has a long standing debate around whether it is even a parable or an actual account. First, we shouldn't be focused on there being five brothers. There are six. The man in torment has five brothers, ...


4

They are only available by grace, which is why Jesus asked us to purchase it from Him. The fact that it is free grace does not mean it does not require cooperation from us. If we take the parable of the man who sold all to purchase a field where he believed the treasure was, likewise we should do similarly spiritually - to forsaken our attachment to the ...


4

The brother's harsh remark betrayed that he had the spirit of a hireling, rather than that of a son. His service for the father was not one motivated by love, but rather by the promise of reward. Even though he had not gone into great excesses like the younger brother, his failure to show the same concern for his lost brother as the father did showed that he ...


4

John Calvin in his commentary on Matthew encourages us to not get bogged down in the minutia of the parables. However, he essentially equates the oil to zeal. Some people give themselves a good deal of uneasiness about the lamps, the vessels, and the oil; but the plain and natural meaning of the whole is, that it is not enough to have ardent zeal for a ...


3

There are already two good answers here representing the typical interpretation of these parables, that the rapid growth of the mustard plant and yeast are pictures of the rapid growth of Christianity, so I'd like to offer a contrasting view: these parables are actually a warning about corruption within the Church. This is a minority view (see sources below)...


3

Here Jesus teaches that He has come to prepare us for the kingdom of heaven (Matt. 13.31) and this kingdom of heaven has to be first created within us if we have to be partners of that kingdom. This kingdom is created within us by His message of Gospel which is simplest of all. Luke 17:21 nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!’ or ‘There!’ For indeed, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible