14

One could perhaps say that the dogmatic definition of papal infallibility as expressed at Vatican I is the Church's formal way of dealing with this tension. The case of Pope Honorius has of course been debated for centuries and was brought up prior to Vatican I as an argument against papal infallibility. The old Catholic Encyclopedia has a helpful summary of ...


11

This is not completely hypothetical. In the mid-300s, Pope Liberius may have signed a statement supporting what later became known as Arian heresy. That he did so in exile and possibly under torture is mitigation, and the story is complex, but it is a more concrete version of this question. In any event, there was clear pressure from the Emperor that came ...


11

The key Biblical passage is Mt 16:18: "And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it" (NRSVCE). Though such a citation inevitably hearkens back to certain meta-questions about the use of "πέτρᾳ," the Catholic Church has always seen it as referring to the specific ...


7

Let me begin with the second question, which is simpler. The Catholic Church does not believe in modern revelation. The Catechism of the Catholic Church says 66 "The Christian economy, therefore, since it is the new and definitive Covenant, will never pass away; and no new public revelation is to be expected before the glorious manifestation of our Lord ...


7

The words used in this question, for example, “Errorless”, or by using open statements solely without proper parameters like “infallibility” without setting up boundaries makes the question easy to answer. No, Jesus never stated or certified that the apostles where errorless (In all Things) or infallible (In all things), ever. I may be wrong but I feel ...


7

No, a retired pope is not infallible because that guarantee is not a personal quality; it is attached to the office that he no longer holds. This is true in terms of the pope’s extraordinary teaching authority, which Pope Pius XII used in his 1950 definition of Mary’s assumption into heaven. He acknowledged consulting the world’s bishops prior to that ...


6

Pope Pius XII—in his apostolic constitution that defines the dogma of the Immaculate Conception, Munificentissimus Deus (1950)—describes the process in which he sought counsel from all the bishops of the world in the letter Deiparæ Virginis Mariæ (1946), where he asked them (§11): Do you, venerable brethren, in your outstanding wisdom and prudence, judge ...


6

First of all, it is important to understand the very strict conditions under which a Pope declares things ex cathedra. To begin with, he can only make such a declaration about doctrine. Here is how the Catechism of the Catholic Church describes Papal infallibility: 891 "The Roman Pontiff, head of the college of bishops, enjoys this infallibility in ...


5

The doctrine of infallibility is that the pope cannot abuse his power when declaring and defining a dogma. In other words, infallible means that he will not teach heresy when speaking ex-cathedra. Catholic believe that Holy Spirit will protect him from erring when doing so. ...Catholics were required to wear a colander on their heads at all times... Ex-...


4

As you have known already not all pronouncements from a pope is spoken ex-cathedra. And the answer that you have quoted notes the three points to be fulfilled in order to make a pronouncement ex-cathedra: to be held by the whole church, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, he defines a doctrine concerning faith or morals If we test any ...


4

You massively misunderstand the process of promulgating doctrine. It's not a magic process where God causes true statements to be generated out of thin air. Doctrine is developed through prayer, research, consultation, discernment and much more, and involves the whole church, not just the Pope. The belief is that God guides this process to ensure it is ...


4

According to Catholicism, do individual bishops have the safeguard of Infallibility or Indefectibility? The short answer on both counts is no. First of all what is indefectibility? Indefectibility Definition Imperishable duration of the Church and her immutability until the end of time. The First Vatican Council declared that the Church ...


3

The Arian controversy was dealt with at a time when the doctrine of papal infallibility was not yet established. Although it was an ecumenical council which authoritatively declared Trinitarian Orthodoxy, belief was actually mandated by Emperor Theodosius. I doubt whether, during the fourth century, there was ever a time when almost no one in the Church ...


3

What would happen if a pope were to be a formal heretic? Formal heresy is obstinately denying Catholic truths, even after being warned. If a pope were to define a "dogma" ex cathedra that contradicts Catholic teaching, this "dogma" would not be binding nor be protected by papal infallibility as defined at Vatican I. Definable Catholic dogmas must first be ...


3

The First Vatican Council's Pastor Æternus said, under Pope Pius IX's authority, regarding papal infallibility: …we teach and define that it is a dogma divinely revealed: that the Roman Pontiff, when he speaks ex cathedra, that is, when in discharge of the office of pastor and doctor of all Christians, by virtue of his supreme Apostolic authority, ...


3

Ex cathedra is the means by which a pope defines dogma. Infallible means "not prone to err." The First Vatican Council says a pope cannot err when defining dogma. This does not imply he's prone to err when not defining dogma, nor does it mean he must speak ex cathedra to be inerrant. Encyclicals, for example, are inerrant; otherwise, the Church would ...


3

Everett Ferguson, in Church History, I, 17.I, summarizes Roman Catholic response to this question as follows: Roman Catholics have defended Honorius's orthodoxy (and so papal infallibility) by various explanations:   (1) he used "one will" in a moral, not physical, sense;   (2) his was a private view not expressed ex cathedra; ...


3

In the last chapter, ch. V "The Relation of the Holy Ghost to the Divine Tradition of the Faith" (pp. 210-48), of Card. Manning's The Temporal Mission of the Holy Ghost, he shows how the Holy Ghost has preserved the Church pure, comparing it to the dissolution of other sects like Protestantism. Anytime the Church convenes a dogmatic, General Council (like ...


3

For something to be declared a Dogma, two conditions are required: 1) the statement is within the scope of Dogma. This is, it refers to faith or morals. 2) the statement does not contradict other Dogmas (because the Magisterium cannot contradict itself, as it is infallible on matters of faith and morals). Regarding 1), it seems clear that the creation of ...


2

Ecumenical Councils are the top of the list, simply because the whole of the Church gets together to promulgate doctrine. These doctrines are signed by the Pope at the end of the Council, and are binding. Some of the doctrines are administrative in nature, and can be modified, changed, added to, or removed. Others, which deal with faith or morals, are ...


2

Heretics lose their office in the Church. Pope Paul IV, Bull Cum ex Apostolatus Officio, Feb. 15, 1559: “1… Remembering also that, where danger is greater, it must more fully and more diligently be counteracted, We have been concerned lest false prophets or others, even if they have only secular jurisdiction, should wretchedly ensnare the ...


2

First of all, and purely as an incidental note, most Christians are Catholic (though that's just barely true). To allow that the Pope can speak infallibly is different from "keeping the canon open", that is, allowing the possibility of additional books of Sacred Scripture. I cannot find anywhere in Church documents an official statement to the precise ...


2

Faith and Morals "Faith and morals" is not a technical formula. It basically just means "beliefs and actions." The phrase itself is not meant to limit the scope of teaching, it is just meant to say that the Church has the authority to determine what Christians ought to believe and how Christians ought to act. Some think the Church can ...


2

The English word "overseas" is used to refer generally to other countries, or parts of the world. This stems from the fact that historically the majority of English speakers, when going to another country, travelled over the sea. In Italy, and other parts of Continental Europe, the way to other countries was more often over the mountains than across the ...


2

Bishops "infallible when in agreement with the Roman Pontiff they impose on the faithful a doctrine to be held definitively". Sacræ Theologiæ Summa IB p. 198: Bishops, successors of the Apostles, are infallible when in agreement with the Roman Pontiff they impose on the faithful a doctrine to be held definitively, whether in a Council or outside ...


1

I believe that the OP means: Identifying Ordinary and Universal Magisterium of the Catholic Church. I can understand some confusion on this topic as the terms in use are in no way constant and even are somewhat changeable. The Church has yet to update its' canonical language on this subject. The term ‘ordinary magisterium’ was first used by Pius IX in the ...


1

Do not put the LORD your God to the test (Deuteronomy 6:16). We know the Pope is infallible because God gave Peter specifically, and the Apostles generally, the Keys of the Kingdom. What the Apostles can do collectively (like in an Ecumenical Council), Peter can do as an individual. Same keys, but different ways to excerise them. Furthermore, the Pope and ...


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