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Popes' Coat of Arms and Saint Malachy Prophecy of the Popes No pope chooses his name or coat of arms based on the Prophecies of Popes which are attributed to the Irish St. Malachy. That seems like a reasonable weak reason for a pope to choose his papal name based on St. Malachy’s predictions, to say the least, if not superfluous altogether by some people. ...


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the Holy See is against all self-determination moves that are outside decolonization processes. The Catholic reason for this is fairly simple. The people don't have a right to overthrow or revolt against legitimate rulers. The reason that decolonization processes are good is that they take away a nation's unjust claim to another sovereign peoples. IE, the ...


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Wikipedia's Four Marks of the Church ... one, holy, catholic and apostolic ... links to One true church which purports to outline the Roman Catholic doctrine -- 7 paragraphs with 15 footnotes which I won't copy-and-paste here. That does mention "Peter" four times, including, The Church recognizes that in many ways she is linked with those who, being ...


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The section "Of the Institution of the Apostolic Primacy in blessed Peter" of the First Vatican Council's Dogmatic Constitution on the Church of Christ (Pastor Æternus) quotes Matthew 16:18 and related verses: We therefore teach and declare that, according to the testimony of the Gospel, the primacy of jurisdiction over the universal Church of God was ...


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What does “see” in “The Holy See” mean? Each bishop and archbishop has the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of an episcopal see. The Roman Pontiff (Pope) has complete jurisdiction of the Holy See, also known as Vatican City. An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction. Phrases concerning ...


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"See" comes from the Latin word sedes, which means "seat" or "chair". "Holy See" is Sedes Apostolica (lit. "Apostolic Chair") in Latin. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) gives this etymology for see, n.1: Etymology: < Anglo-Norman see, sed, sied, siet, sez, siez, Anglo-Norman and Old French se, sie, Middle French sie, siet dwelling (c 1100), ...


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