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21

"See" comes from the Latin word sedes, which means "seat" or "chair". "Holy See" is Sedes Apostolica (lit. "Apostolic Chair") in Latin. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) gives this etymology for see, n.1: Etymology: < Anglo-Norman see, sed, sied, siet, sez, siez, Anglo-Norman and Old French se, sie, Middle French sie, siet dwelling (c 1100), ...


20

What does “see” in “The Holy See” mean? Each bishop and archbishop has the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of an episcopal see. The Roman Pontiff (Pope) has complete jurisdiction of the Holy See, also known as Vatican City. An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction. Phrases concerning ...


7

No, a retired pope is not infallible because that guarantee is not a personal quality; it is attached to the office that he no longer holds. This is true in terms of the pope’s extraordinary teaching authority, which Pope Pius XII used in his 1950 definition of Mary’s assumption into heaven. He acknowledged consulting the world’s bishops prior to that ...


4

The section "Of the Institution of the Apostolic Primacy in blessed Peter" of the First Vatican Council's Dogmatic Constitution on the Church of Christ (Pastor Æternus) quotes Matthew 16:18 and related verses: We therefore teach and declare that, according to the testimony of the Gospel, the primacy of jurisdiction over the universal Church of God was ...


4

It's frustrating when an asker of a question then goes on to provide what he or she considers to be the correct answer. Perhaps that is why nobody has bothered to give an answer until now (2 years and 4 months later). After all, what is there left to say when you provide fulsome quotes that appear to confirm your conclusion, namely, "This is sedevacantism ...


4

Here is the short answer to your question: Titles: The most noteworthy of the titles are Papa, Summus Pontifex, Pontifex Maximus, Servus servorum Dei. The title pope (papa) was, as has been stated, at one time employed with far more latitude. In the East it has always been used to designate simple priests. In the Western Church, however, it seems from the ...


3

When visiting Rome, it is quite a common thing to see pilgrims and tourists buying souvenirs either close to the Vatican or right in Vatican City itself. Buying a souvenir of the reigning Sovereign Pontiff is very popular when near the Vatican. Traditionally any medal of a reigning pope will have his image on one side. In the case of the medallion at hand ...


3

The New Catholic Encyclopedia (2003 edition) states: As a name, it is derived from the Latin papa, in turn derived from the Greek παπᾶς (παππᾶς), which in classical Greek was a child’s word for father. Papa and παπᾶς appear in Christian literature from the beginning of the 3d century as a title used of bishops, suggesting their spiritual paternity. ...


2

To have a crying boy ask that question is certainly a hard situation. However, the entire New Testament is completely clear that without faith in Christ, proven by the way a person chooses to live their lives (repentance and good works based on faith in Jesus), it is impossible to please God. I discern that the pope gave the boy, and everyone who heard, ...


2

"Ioannes Paulus II Pont[ifex] Max[imus]" means "John Paul II Supreme Pontiff". It's hard to tell what the verso is, but perhaps it's St. Peter passing his keys to John Paul II.


2

What is the proper title for someone who was a pope and is now a canonized saint. I do not believe there is a single proper way to address a pope who has been canonized. That said, I have seen all four of your examples in usage. There seems to be no official way of doing so either. That said, the most common usage (and the one I prefer the most) is your ...


2

Wikipedia's Four Marks of the Church ... one, holy, catholic and apostolic ... links to One true church which purports to outline the Roman Catholic doctrine -- 7 paragraphs with 15 footnotes which I won't copy-and-paste here. That does mention "Peter" four times, including, The Church recognizes that in many ways she is linked with those who, being ...


1

Yes, there have been several. Salza & Siscoe's True or False Pope (1st ed.) pp. 7-8: Mirko Fabris (d. 2012), a stand-up comedian from Croatia, was elected by a "Conclave" in 1978 and became "Pope" Krav (his stage name). David Bawden, a seminary drop-out who lives with his mother in a farmhouse in Kansas, was elected "Pope" Michael by six lay people ...


1

Why does the pope not wear a biretta? It not only is not part of the Roman Catholic tradition, it would be at odds with the traditions of the Norbertines or White Canons who actually wear a white biretta. The biretta may be used by all ranks of the Latin clergy cardinals and other bishops to priests, deacons, and even seminarians (who are not clergy, ...


1

I also think that Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI has lost supernatural assistance and related "infallibility" about his possible formal declarations concerning faith and moral as Pope when he abdicated this role. This is on the basis that the infallibility has given by Holy Spirit to the Pope (other than to the apostolic collegium) when he officially speaks as ...


1

I can't answer for traditionalists who are not sedevacantists, but for sedevacantists there is no problem here. When there is a pope, we will follow him. I don't think your quotation from St. Ambrose was intended to imply that, during periods when there is no pope, the church and God disappear. (There have often been periods without a pope. Until recently, ...


1

Was the Catholic title “vicar of Christ” conceived as an “assistant” or an “agent”? The short answer is: The original theological connotations of the title had a pastoral sense to it, evoking the words of Christ to the Apostle Peter, regarded by the first Catholic Pope in John 21:16-17, "Feed my lambs... Feed my sheep", so Christ made Peter his vicar. The ...


1

Popes' Coat of Arms and Saint Malachy Prophecy of the Popes No pope chooses his name or coat of arms based on the Prophecies of Popes which are attributed to the Irish St. Malachy. That seems like a reasonable weak reason for a pope to choose his papal name based on St. Malachy’s predictions, to say the least, if not superfluous altogether by some people. ...


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