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31

Actually the opposite: his pay went down to 0. The pope receives no salary. His modest daily needs (food, shelter, clothing, medical care) are provided for by the Vatican1. Popes do not accumulate wealth, and usually die in office. It's difficult to even imagine what he would use money for. He has all he needs. He is able to say the Mass, and he is able to ...


28

It has happened to the present Pope. Dr. Anca-Maria Cernea, Doctor at the Center for Diagnosis and Treatment-Victor Babes and President of the Association of Catholic Doctors of Bucharest (Romania) made the following speech to the Fourteenth Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, at which the Pope was present, on Friday 16 October 2015. The ...


27

Your friend is confused. Very confused. The Pope is not God according to any official Catholic teaching. Catholics believe a lot of things about the Pope including his ability so speak infallibly (see ex cathedra) and that his role is that of an authoritative representative of God (see vicar of Christ). They believe a lot of things about the Pope that ...


21

"See" comes from the Latin word sedes, which means "seat" or "chair". "Holy See" is Sedes Apostolica (lit. "Apostolic Chair") in Latin. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) gives this etymology for see, n.1: Etymology: < Anglo-Norman see, sed, sied, siet, sez, siez, Anglo-Norman and Old French se, sie, Middle French sie, siet dwelling (c 1100), ...


20

What does “see” in “The Holy See” mean? Each bishop and archbishop has the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of an episcopal see. The Roman Pontiff (Pope) has complete jurisdiction of the Holy See, also known as Vatican City. An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction. Phrases concerning ...


17

Luther saw the church becoming significantly corrupted much earlier than we might think. Generally I would say that Luther perceived a split between the 'real' church and the 'false church' basically around the time of St. Augustine, for he always separated the ritualistic ecclesiastical doctrine of religion, from the Augustinian spiritual doctrine of ...


17

The chair was real, but its actual function is different from what the legend says. And actually, it seems to have been three chairs: one "commode"-type seat, and two porphyry "pierced" chairs. Read on for more. In Misconceptions About the Middle Ages (page 66-7; ed. Harris and Grigsby), a description is given of the chairs' function in papal coronations: ...


16

You have asked specifically on an infallible statement, so the answer is NO. That is in the matters of Faith and morals which applies to the universal church, they have not contradicted each other. But on other issues like when they make disciplinary and administrative decisions they have. For example, Pope Clement XIV suppressed the Jesuits in 1773, but ...


16

Most scholars dismiss this is as fiction. Indeed the Catholic Encyclopedia brings up multiple variations on the story, each of which can be easily debunked. Perhaps the most damning proof that this is a legend would stem from the fact that nobody - including enemies at the time - ever made such accusations. From Wikipedia: It is also notable that ...


16

On a historical note, as with Pope Joan story, this too never happened. These the two myths became connected in a well circulated rumor which what eye-witnesses to medieval papal coronations believed they were watching. The result was the often repeated report of a public rite always seen by others, never by the narrator. If Pope Joan story is not true, ...


15

When Jesus first met Peter, he was known as "Simon, son of John". Simon was a fisherman as likely his father was and his father's father and so on. In eastern and middle-eastern cultures, a person's identity is much more closely associated with who his father is. Simon's identity as a fisherman was closely tied to who his father was. When Jesus calls ...


14

There is a fair bit of precedent, though none of it is very recent. The provisions are found not in Universi Dominici Gregis itself, but in the companion book of ritual, Ordo rituum conclavis (see UDG §90). This 2005 edition is the latest in a series first codified in 1516 and frequently republished.1 I do not know if the 2005 version makes any changes to ...


14

Actually it might be little known fact, but yes, they do get paid, but not when they are alive though. Three bags containing gold, silver, and copper coins are placed in the coffin beside the body of a dead pope. Each bag contains one coin for each year in his reign. This is the only monetary compensation a pope receives for his service as pope. The last ...


14

That's interesting! Catholics tend to avoid using heretical names. In fact, I believe that it's in canon law that baptismal names cannot be the names of heretics, and that it is the priest's duty to prevent such a name from being used. So it is very strange that any pope would the name of a known heretic. So why do we have two popes with the name of a ...


14

I don't see the problem, and the Church sees no problem worth explaining, because: Unlike some groups, Catholics don't think that death is a sign from God that a person is unworthy. Being elected pope makes a man infallible under certain conditions. It doesn't make him sinless or immortal. It was God's plan to have a man unanimously elected, and then to ...


13

As this question explains, the Pope is not considered infallible every time he speaks, but only when he speaks ex cathedra. Essentially this means only when he makes a deliberately definitive pronouncement on a matter of doctrine. The quote you give is therefore not relevant. Even if Peter were considered a Pope at this point, the incident described would ...


13

This site has a good overview of the history from a Catholic viewpoint. Here is a high level overview based on that site and the article on Wikipedia (which currently stands in question of its neutrality). After the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, the church headquartered at Constantinople began to have ongoing squabbles with Rome due in some part to ...


13

Gregory XII resigned by proxy at the Council of Constance. He had appointed Cardinal Giovanni Dominici of Ragusa and Carlo Malatesta to represent him, and Malatesta announced the resignation which was accepted by the Council. That Council deposed Antipope John XXIII and excommunicated Antipope Benedict XIII. Gregory's resignation was necessary to end the ...


12

It is the Dean of the College of Cardinals, currently Cardinal Angelo Sodano. This role for the Dean is many centuries old. The present rules for the election of the Pope are mostly found in the Apostolic Constitution Universi Dominici gregis, issued by John Paul II in 1996. It contains the following: (19) The Dean of the College of Cardinals, for his ...


12

It means "We Have a Pope!" Usually the media declares this as soon as it sees white smoke, but the proper announcement is actually given by the Cardinal Protodeacon a short time later. Here is the English text of the full announcement, from the recent election of Pope Francis: I announce to you a great joy: We have a pope! The most eminent and most ...


12

The Church excuses them from voting out of concern for the Cardinals themselves. Selecting the Supreme Pontiff can be a great burden of responsibility, and especially so when one is advanced in age. These Cardinals instead take the role of supporting the electors by helping to lead the People of God in prayer during the election. From Pope John Paul II's ...


12

This answer draws extensively from Angel Pope and Papal Antichrist, Bernard McGinn, Church History 47(2):155-173, 1978. McGinn is a Catholic and an expert on medieval mysticism. The identification of the Pope with the Antichrist of Revelation comes essentially from Joachim of Fiore, a twelfth-century mystic who was particularly interested in the pattern of ...


12

Popes confess to another priest, like any other priest. Pope Francis' long-standing confessor is a Croatian Franciscan priest in Argentina, Fr Berislav Ostojic. People get to choose their own confessor whom they are comfortable with and trust to give good advice. The Pope is no different to anyone else. I'm not sure that confession can be conducted by ...


12

Paragraph 937 of the Catechism is part of an "In Brief" section that occurs at the end of every topic of the Catechism. The "In Brief" sections are intended to summarize the paragraphs that have gone before. In this case, the paragraph is restating material that occurs in paragraphs 881 and 882. In particular: "For the Roman Pontiff, by reason of his ...


11

No. The Pope did not permit or condone artificial birth control. There's a full critique of a number of statements from Light of the World, together with statements from the Vatican which provide a gloss, on the website of the Holy Family Monastery, although it appears they consider that the Pope has erred simply because his statements will be used to ...


11

They don't "relate to the US", except insofar as the headquarters of the church happen to be located in the US. There aren't "international branches" of the LDS church; there is one worldwide church. The church is organized into individual congregations, known as wards or branches (a branch being a smaller congregation in an area where the church is not yet ...


11

Actually cardinals, bishops and pope, all hold one and the same degree of Holy Orders in the Catholic Church. All of them are bishops. Pope: Bishop of Rome is called Pope. As the bishop of Rome he is considered to be first amongst equals.Supremacy of Popes Pope just means Father/Papa Cardinals: They are special bishopssee note 1 chosen by the Pope to help ...


11

This is not completely hypothetical. In the mid-300s, Pope Liberius may have signed a statement supporting what later became known as Arian heresy. That he did so in exile and possibly under torture is mitigation, and the story is complex, but it is a more concrete version of this question. In any event, there was clear pressure from the Emperor that came ...


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