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The way I understand it (and the way I've always seen it taught, whether at my Church, or in various other sermons/articles) is: We inherit a sinful nature, meaning that we have a predilection for sin. The evidence is pretty clear from observation. Nobody has to teach a baby how to be selfish, it's part of our nature. (Some would call it evolutionary ...


6

It is generally a very bad idea to be basing any kind of argument on a single bible verse. The meaning of verses depends very much on the context in which they are written. You always need to be looking at the surrounding passage, and often the whole book that they are written in. In this case the passage from Ezekiel is talking about punishment for ...


3

Being impatient for answer I looked up the works of Arminias and found right away in Volume 1 - ARTICLES XIII AND XIV,  P228 that he argues against the imputation of guilt on infants. For example, among many other statements against the imputation of guilt on infants, he says (in the words of his friend) "When Adam sinned in his own person and with his ...


3

Original Sin Sin is essentially a rejection of (or deviation from) God (or His ways). I tend to think of the event of Adam's disobedience as the "original sin", which resulted in mankind being separated from God... as opposed to mankind possessing a particular kind of ("original") sin due to Adam's mistake - if that makes sense. In other words: We are ...


2

I grew up in a Methodist church. I don't know if the following is the official theology of the Methodist church, but it is the understanding I have from my years in that community. Original Sin is a big phrase that has more or less import depending who one is talking to; sometimes it simply means "the first sin, committed by Eve and then Adam," and ...


2

The closest things we have to an "authoritative" commentary on the Westminster Confession are the two catechisms that were published alongside it.1 Both the Confession and those catechisms have attached to them "scripture proofs" that were appended somewhat hastily after the original writing of the documents, and which are sometimes criticized as being ...


1

Your question brings up two points: 1 - Will all of humanity return to the original state of Adam & Eve? 2 - If so, will this happen before the Second Coming, or after? To answer the first question - humanity is not meant to return to the exact same state of Adam and Eve. Adam and Eve were created mortal. But because they had the Tree of Life in the ...


1

No, all of mankind will not return to the original state of Adam and Eve. The Origenists' heresy of apokatastasis or doctrinal universalism claimed "that hell is essentially a kind of purgatory in which sins are expiated, so that eventually everyone will be saved." The following proposition was condemned as heretical in 543 A.D. (Denzinger 411): the ...


1

In Latin theology original sin does entails inheriting the burden of Adam's sin (in Latin reatum) referring to penalty (in CCC, stain of original sin) not guilt (lat. culpa). Therefore there is no substantial difference. People tend to conflate Protestant's original guilt into St. Augustine's original sin. With this being clarified there is no substantial ...


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