13

There is an assumption in this question that is actually the very problem that the question addresses. This question assumes that in the exact same situation you would act differently than Adam and Eve would. However, why would you? Would a loving God not have placed the people in the garden that gave humanity the best chance at continuing at sinless ...


8

The way I understand it (and the way I've always seen it taught, whether at my Church, or in various other sermons/articles) is: We inherit a sinful nature, meaning that we have a predilection for sin. The evidence is pretty clear from observation. Nobody has to teach a baby how to be selfish, it's part of our nature. (Some would call it evolutionary ...


6

Catholics (i.e., Western or Latin -- I belong to this group) believe that original sin entails actually inheriting the burden of Adam's Sin, which is mortal sin keeping us from entering heaven without a method of acquiring sanctifying grace, such as baptism. Original sin also threw all of nature into discord, and is the source of man's concupiscence. The ...


6

The story of Adam and Eve is not about God punishing us for the sin of one man. God punishes us for our own sins, which we have all committed: for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23 NIV) If anything, the story of Adam and Eve is there not to explain why are punished, but to explain why each person individually chooses to sin.


6

Basically anyone that is born, is born of the world, so the act of being conceived brings brings the stain of original sin upon each and every person. There is an interesting article (pdf) that goes through some of the thoughts of the early church fathers that relate to this subject. This is one of the more relevant portions of the article: What had ...


4

It is generally a very bad idea to be basing any kind of argument on a single bible verse. The meaning of verses depends very much on the context in which they are written. You always need to be looking at the surrounding passage, and often the whole book that they are written in. In this case the passage from Ezekiel is talking about punishment for ...


3

Original Sin Sin is essentially a rejection of (or deviation from) God (or His ways). I tend to think of the event of Adam's disobedience as the "original sin", which resulted in mankind being separated from God... as opposed to mankind possessing a particular kind of ("original") sin due to Adam's mistake - if that makes sense. In other words: We are ...


3

Being impatient for answer I looked up the works of Arminias and found right away in Volume 1 - ARTICLES XIII AND XIV,  P228 that he argues against the imputation of guilt on infants. For example, among many other statements against the imputation of guilt on infants, he says (in the words of his friend) "When Adam sinned in his own person and with his ...


3

Adam and Eve were made perfect, but with free will. They chose to sin. Would we not make the same choice, if we were in their place? Since we've all chosen to sin at some point (Romans 3:10-12) in our lives, I think the answer must be Yes.


3

I don't think He has punished every human for one's mistake. I also don't believe that the world began with Adam and Eve, I think that is the way God used to explain how things worked at that time. And I believe on that based on the scripture when Caem was expelled from paradise and head to a village, if he was going to a village, who lived in this village ...


3

We are not necessarily "being punished". We are not held accountable for their sin. Adam and Eve, our first ancestors, became sinful and we have inherited their sinful nature being born from them. Adam failed where Christ succeeded. That is why we must be "born again". God chose perfectly a man and woman who would represent mankind. Would not all of us at ...


2

It is incorrect to assume that God is punishing us, simply because of Adam & Eve's sin. Rather, the story of Adam and Eve teaches us how sin entered the world. Adam and Eve were created and, like children, were innocent. As the first people, their sin is the first sin to blemish this world (hence the term "original sin"). They were punished, but it ...


2

I grew up in a Methodist church. I don't know if the following is the official theology of the Methodist church, but it is the understanding I have from my years in that community. Original Sin is a big phrase that has more or less import depending who one is talking to; sometimes it simply means "the first sin, committed by Eve and then Adam," and ...


2

Excellent question. It highlights apparent contradictions given God's attributes: A Just God would not blame any human for the actions of another, especially given the action of one were not caused or influenced by the other. A Just God would also not burden humans by birth with a sinful nature either (as some have suggested) and instead would start us ...


2

The closest things we have to an "authoritative" commentary on the Westminster Confession are the two catechisms that were published alongside it.1 Both the Confession and those catechisms have attached to them "scripture proofs" that were appended somewhat hastily after the original writing of the documents, and which are sometimes criticized as being ...


1

In Latin theology original sin does entails inheriting the burden of Adam's sin (in Latin reatum) referring to penalty (in CCC, stain of original sin) not guilt (lat. culpa). Therefore there is no substantial difference. People tend to conflate Protestant's original guilt into St. Augustine's original sin. With this being clarified there is no substantial ...


1

Many answers were given, so if you get all the way here, I'll try to be brief. First, Adam was punished because God is just. His justice is demonstrated by the fact that he punishes Adam and Eve. The guilty could not remain unpunished and God yet remain just. Second, the holiness of God is on display here. Holiness cannot be in contact with unholiness. ...


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