8

What is seen to actually occur if a female were to be the subject of laying on of the hands in ordinations, according to the Catholic Church? The short answer is nothing. The woman in question is not ordained, even after going through the motions of an ordination. Pope John Paul II in his Apostolic Letter Ordinatio Sacerdotalis is very clear on the ...


7

Whenever you have questions like this, the first place to turn is wikipedia. Of course, you can never really "trust" wikipedia, but you can still get a good overview of the situation, and---much more importantly---you can use its references to track down the information you really want. So, if you visit the wikipedia page on Ignatius, you will find two ...


7

The reason that the Church does not ordain women as deacons is similar to that for not ordaining women as priests. (There is a separate question answering that.) In essence, the answer is that the Church only has the power to act with those powers and abilities that Jesus has entrusted to it; it has no capacity do otherwise. For example, Jesus gave priests ...


7

First let me correct the assumption that the model you describe is normal for Christian pastors. It is in fact only a minority that follow this. The vast majority of Christian churches, including Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran and Presbyterians follow an entirely different model. In this model they: Discern whether or not the person has a calling to Christian ...


6

Baptists and many evangelicals reject the notion of a sacremental "priest" that is somehow in essence different than mere laity, but still ordain their ministers. A "priest" confers the idea that the person is specially endowed with the ability to stand between man and God. Those who subscribe to the idea of the "priesthood of all believers" do not believe ...


6

To my mind, there is a similar question to that of "re-baptism". If someone who is already baptised undergoes the baptism ceremony a second time, it doesn't have an effect. As a priest of mine once said about a friend of mine who had joined a Baptist church: "He didn't get rebaptised: he just got wet." The phrase in the Canons is: Every person not yet ...


5

There's really nothing comparable between the two issues: no one thinks that being a woman is sinful, but many Christian denominations think that all sex outside of heterosexual marriage is sinful. When we look the passages which give the criteria for church leaders such as 1 Timothy 3 we see several distinct criteria: being above reproach a husband of one ...


5

Do all Catholic seminary schools require instruction in Latin and/or Greek? Not all Catholic seminaries require their seminarians to learn Latin unfortunately. Greek is often an elective in many seminaries. If a seminarian is studying from the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, then yes. The traditional Mass is said in Latin and a working knowledge of the ...


4

You are correct that John Chavis, although he is reported to have been the first college-educated Black/African in America, was never ordained. He was licenced to minister. It appears that John Gloucester, the founder of the first African American Presbyterian Church in the US, was the first African American Presbyterian ordained. His ordination was on ...


4

John Calvin, whose theology heavily influenced every Reformer (here I exclude the Anabaptists and other such groups), has a chapter in his Institutes of the Christian Religion which discusses the clergy generally, and has some paragraphs on the ordination of clergy. I suggest you read the entire chapter for better context (and the entire book for good ...


3

Was any transgender person ever ordained as a Catholic priest? The short answer is no. According to the Catholic Church's moral doctrine, homosexual attraction is disordered, and homosexual acts themselves are sinful. However, the Church does allow the ordination of men who may have, in the past, experienced same-sex attraction, but only on the condition ...


3

In what ways is the term “priesthood” used in Catholic tradition? Traditionally, there are only two ways that term priesthood is used within the Church as well as one in the Ancient Covenant of the Jewish people of the Old Testament, known as the Aaronic priesthood. The priesthood of the New Covenant is distinctly different from the priesthood of the Old ...


3

St. Robert's opinion that St. Peter consecrated the other Apostles bishops doesn't seem common. For example, D. I. Lanslots, O.S.B., says in his The Primitive Church: The Church in the Days of the Apostles ch. 15: Christ directly consecrated His Apostles bishops; they and their successors were to consecrate all others. The "Apostolic College" Catholic ...


3

The earliest mention we have to Cathedral Schools is from the Second Council of Toledo in 527; they were set up in order to guarantee the formation of priests after the fall of the Empire caused the collapse of the Roman system of education. After all, priests must at least be able to read, and after the general emptying of the cities in the Early Middle ...


3

"Order" comes from the Latin word "ordo", which can mean "rank", "class", "grade"—things of that sort. The Catechism, in its discussion of the Sacrament of Holy Orders, says: The word order [sic, sc. ordo] in Roman antiquity designated an established civil body, especially a governing body. Ordinatio means ...


3

No, joining a Baptist church does not require ordination of any sort. It would make for a strange church where only ordained people were permitted membership.


2

It appears we have no hard evidence of this, in spite of the legends that have grown up around Ignatius of Antioch. Thomas J. Heffernan says in Sacred Biography, page 58, that we know nothing about the historical figure of Ignatius of Antioch other than his journey to martyrdom from Antioch to Rome and that he wrote letters to Christian communities along the ...


2

I know nothing about usage of the word order (except that the ordaining process is a sacrament called Holy Orders), but I can address the first part of your question: what is meant by order (as opposed to jurisdiction)? The answer is that there is a hierarchy of functions or roles in the church's offices. Some offices allow the ordained person to do more ...


2

It appears that for autocephalous Orthodox Churches, their Holy Synod has the authority to laicize them. Although the person in question was "demoted" to monk and not fully laicized, I believe I have found an illustrative and extremely recent example (Wikipedia, which I quote below [editing out the references]; news source). The person in question, ...


2

The Council of Trent (1545-1563) wrote a decree Sacrificium et sacerdotium on the holy orders dealing with this question: Nullus in posterum ad subdiaconatus ordinem ante vigesimum secundum ad diaconatus ante vigesimum tertium ad presbyteratus ante vigesimum quintum aetatis suae annum promoveatur. Sciant tamen episcopi non singulos in ea ...


1

The list is not exclusive - curates are ordained. (Did you mean, ordinand - someone who is training for ordination?). Also there are several statuses for lay people who are not ordained: licensed lay minister - someone who's not ordained but has a leadership role in a church. recognised authorised Depending on what your purpose is, you could simply ask ...


1

The Free Methodist Church has a long history of ordaining women; in fact women were pastoring Free Methodist churches before they had the right to vote in the United States. The head pastor of my own congregation from 1915-1916 was one Rev. Laura Lamb. In 1891 B.T. Roberts, one of the denomination's founders, wrote an exhaustive analysis in which he ...


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