23

Nothing to do with religion / God / whatever, but there seems to be a fundamental flaw in your argument here. Event A causes event B within the universe. God decides that he does not want event B to occur so he stops event A from happening. Event A no longer happened and therefore God would never intervene in the first place. Go to 1. The third ...


13

The theological term here is kenosis From Phillipians 2:6-7 though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself ... In short, Jesus gave up the perks of being God in order to identify with humanity.


11

The Bible indicates that God is eternal and outside of time. As we understand from science, time, space, and matter all came into existence at once. The Creator of time, space, and matter must of necessity be outside of time, space, and matter. God reveals in the Scriptures that He is eternal (outside of time) and He is spirit (outside of space and matter)...


10

There are an awful lot of assumptions here. There is but one way to stop B There is no way to stop B if A has happened Etc But it mainly boils down to this main flaw in the logic: Event A no longer happened and therefore God would never intervene in the first place. Go to 1. Being all knowing God would of course be able to know the possibility of A ...


8

God created you, so for sure he knows you! God is also watching each one of us and he loves ❤ us. And yes, there are quotations, to be sure! Job 28:24 For he looks to the ends of the earth and sees everything under the heavens. 1 John 3:19-20 By this we shall know that we are of the truth and reassure our heart before him; for whenever our heart ...


8

God, being the source of all intelligibility of creation, by His nature is all knowledgeable. Although many theists might view God as an 'impersonal force' of some kind, similar to the 'Force' in Star Wars, God is in fact not only personal, but more personal than we could ever imagine. This is due to God's omniscience. We are created in His image, and all ...


7

Short answer(s): Was Jesus omniscient regarding earthly matters? No. At least not at all times. (eg. In Luke 2:52 Jesus is said to grow/increase/advance in wisdom depending on translation - these all imply either a lack of omniscience, or at the very least an unexercised omniscience) Is there a notable doctrine of major denominations about this? Yes,...


6

Looking at the context, one can see that the weakness and foolishness are seemingly so from a perspective of Jews (for whom the weakness of the cross is a stumbling block--this seems to be implied in the mocking presented by the chief priests, elders, and teachers of the law in Matthew 27:41-43, that God would express his power by physically saving his ...


5

I'm sure there are other references, but for example: Omnipresence: Psalm 139:7-12 describes God being everywhere. Omnipotence: I can't think of a Bible verse that says, "God is omnipotent". But Deut 4:37 (and many similar verses) talk about God's "might power". Gen 17:1 and others refer to God as "Almighty". Job 11:7b "Can you find out the limits of the ...


5

Why Did God Create the Universe (or, at least, Humanity)? The answer to that will speak to your question about God's foreknowledge. I will propose an executive summary: the purpose of humanity1 is to know and love God. (Jn 17:3) The testimony of the Scripture is at least compatible with this idea, though I find more than just circumstantial evidence in ...


5

Your main dilemma here is on the authenticity of the Bible. On the authenticity of the Bible: It is indeed a complicated topic to discuss about the authenticity of the Bible. However, there are enough manuscripts available to produce the original text of the Bible. This question "How authentic is Codex Sinaiticus?" may help you get a better idea on original ...


5

Read Psalm 139. God knows everything about you Verses 1-5 O Lord, You have searched me and known me. You know my sitting down and my rising up; You understand my thought afar off. You comprehend my path and my lying down, And are acquainted with all my ways. For there is not a word on my tongue, But behold, O Lord, You know it altogether. You have ...


5

Undoubtedly we can say that Jesus' divine nature is omniscient, but your confusion could result from identifying Wisdom too closely with Jesus. In Luke 11:31-35, Jesus speaks of John the Baptist, himself and then Wisdom, but only in the third person and such terms that it would be difficult for us to think of her as his divine nature: Luke 11:31-35: "Then ...


5

This sounds most like process theology, though open theism is similar on this point. C. Robert Mesle explains the former simply: In process theology, divine omniscience—God's perfect knowledge—means that God knows everything there is to know. But the future does not exist yet, except as a range of possibilities that have not yet been chosen. (Process ...


4

Two possible explanations. 1. God appears foolish to men: 1 Corinthians 1:25 (New Life Version ) God’s plan looked foolish to men, but it is wiser than the best plans of men. God’s plan which may look weak is stronger than the strongest plans of men. The very idea that we are all sinners and God Himself had to come down to earth in human form ...


4

What you are asking about is the rationale behind a doctrine called 'the preservation of Scripture'. The doctrine basically seeks to answer whether or not God will preserve his infalliable message, even though it is transmitted by fallable men. How are the Scriptures Transmitted? (A Primer on Preservation) A straw man would pit Jesus saying, "Surely I ...


3

The God of the Bible states "I declare the end from the beginning." In comparing God to an algorithm, you go against the fundamental claims of God --that is, you create a straw man to knock over. God is not an algorithm, waiting for an asynchronous user event or for some unseen input data. God is the author of the data and thus by necessity of being its ...


3

In standard Christian theology, God is described as omniscient, or all-knowing (by major theologians such as St Aquinas). This is incompatible with being deceived. Accordingly we would not interpret any passage in the Bible as implying God was deceived, unless we wished to discard this core belief.


3

You're assuming that self-reference is required somehow, that God has to "evaluate himself" (whatever that means) when making decisions, and that his decision-making is based solely on observation and not on any sort of predictive ability. There's a much simpler conceptual model: "Something important is about to happen. There are three possible outcomes. ...


3

Only God can know what is in our minds. Even the saints and the Virgin Mary cannot know what's going inside our inner thoughts if we don't let them know (in our prayers). The same rule applies to our guardian angel. So the devil cannot know what goes in our minds. But we should consider Satan is very intelligent and he can read clues, as we can read in ...


3

The answer to this question hinges on how trinitarians understand the incarnation of Christ. And while there is broad (though not quite universal) agreement with the Chalcedonian Definition (451), and its statements that Christ is "truly God and truly Man" with two natures that are joined "unconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, [and] inseparably" in one ...


2

It may be that Satan has always defied God, or (and) that he believes his own lies. The Bible doesn't touch the subject directly.


2

It is, I suppose, conceivable that God is not bound by the laws of logic. But if true further discussion is impossible, as how are we to consider the possibilities except by using logic? I can't imagine how I could prove this either way. Will I present a logical proof that logic always applies? But if logic doesn't apply, then the proof is invalid, and the ...


2

Philippians 4:6 tells us "Be anxious for nothing, but in everything, by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known unto God." In Acts 1:13-14, after Jesus ascends, we see "And when they (the Apostles) had entered, they went up to the upper room, where they were staying, Peter and John and James and Andrew, Philip and ...


2

God knows each and every one of us personally. Our entire purpose in this life, yea the key to eternal life is to ultimately reciprocate that- to come to Know Him and His Son. Consider John 17:3 , Acts 17:27. God is Omniscient, or "all knowing." He knows all things- 1 John 3:20, and His understanding is unsearchable Isaiah 40:28 (literally "there is no ...


2

There is nothing to reconcile, and I will illustrate it in two manners. God the Almighty Christians believe that God is transcendent. He is not bound the universe. He is not described by physics. The uncertainties described by quantum physics are no different. You have already recognized Christianity recognized God as Almighty. Even if we gloss over that ...


2

An extremely comprehensive treatment of the historical position and evolution of this issue from the Catholic Church perspective is here. It is impossible to summarise it in this space without copying from there in extenso. Some remarks: Christology argues that Jesus has two natures, namely divine and human. Therefore, theologians have differentiated ...


2

First, it would be helpful to just define the term for the sake of clarity. Omniscience means "all-knowing" and this is derived from "omni" which is a prefix taken from Latin meaning "all", and "scientia", from Latin for "knowledge." According to many (perhaps most) Reformed theologians, God has foreknowledge of everything NOT because he somehow looks into ...


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