19

A.) less than 2.2 percent of Christians belong to sects professing to believe that Jesus is not God. Do Don't N/A (in billions) Catholicism 1.2 Protestantism 0.801 Eastern Orthodoxy 0.230 Oriental Orthodoxy 0.082 Restorationism 0.045* Unitarian Universalism ...


16

The most useful term is one of those you already mentioned: non-trinitarian. The technically correct—but practically speaking useless—term is unnitarian. As you already found out, the latter quickly becomes confusing due to its overlap with a specific denomination that has other theological (in)distinctives. There is one more related term, Arianism, which ...


13

Latter-day Saints reject the doctrines of the Trinity as taught by most Christian churches today. These creeds were canonized in the fourth and fifth centuries A.D. and do not reflect the thinking or beliefs of the New Testament church.1 That said there isn't too much with the Apostles Creed(in bold) that LDS beliefs differ from. I believe in God, the ...


10

Jehovah’s Witnesses beliefs kind of line up with the text of the Apostle’s Creed, but their interpretation of it largely diverges from common trinitarian interpretations. Here is the ELLC translation of the Apostles’ Creed, phrase by phrase: I believe in God, the Father almighty, Watchtower teaches that God is omnipotent and omniscient​, but not ...


9

Historically, there was a group of persons who claimed to be Christians, but denied the divinity of the Holy Spirit. They were derided by orthodox Christians as Pneumatomachoi (literally, “those who fight the Spirit”) or Macedonians (after the proponent of this idea, named Macedonius—no relation to the geographical region by that name). The Macedonians ...


9

In the early fourth century, many Christians were divided over how best to understand the relationship between God and Jesus. Emperor Constantine called for an ecumenical council of bishops to settle the matter: the Council of Nicea, in 325 AD. The result was a condemnation of 'the Arian heresy'. Letter to Emperor Constantine A few years later, in 327 AD, ...


9

No, it could not be considered valid in that form. (Per the current teaching of the church). Valid baptism (per the Catholic Church) requires use of water and the Trinitarian form. From the Catechism: 1239 The essential rite of the sacrament follows: Baptism properly speaking. It signifies and actually brings about death to sin and entry into the ...


8

Though Swedenborgians generally don't put much focus on charging mainstream, trinitarian Christians with tritheism, a rejection of the Trinity of Persons is key to Swedenborgian doctrine. A key part of that rejection is that the traditional doctrine of the Trinity is viewed as being a belief in three gods rather than in one God, and therefore as being ...


8

Joseph Smith History 1:17 17 It no sooner appeared than I found myself delivered from the enemy which held me bound. When the light rested upon me I saw two Personages, whose brightness and glory defy all description, standing above me in the air. One of them spake unto me, calling me by name and said, pointing to the other—This is My Beloved Son. Hear ...


8

Swedenborg himself had no problems with the Apostles' Creed and he did address it in his writings. It is to be observed, that in the Apostles’ Creed it is said, “I believe in God the Father, in Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit”; in the Nicene Creed, “I believe in one God, the Father, in one Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit,” thus only ...


7

Christadelphian beliefs impact on their view of the Apostle’s Creed, though that Creed is not something mentioned much (if at all) in their literature. Their literature does make it clear how antagonistic they are towards all the fundamental doctrines of what they call ‘Christendom’, so that we can conclude they would never subscribe to that Creed. To ...


6

The Anglican church in many places is extremely lax in disciplining or evicting those with heretical beliefs. Historical Anglicanism had no capacity for non-Trinitarianism, and even though the foundational documents of the Prayer Book and the 39 Articles are accepted to varying extents in various provinces, one of the foundations of the Anglican Communion ...


6

Like many other non-trinitarian groups, Oneness Pentecostals tend to be hesitant to align themselves too closely with any ancient creed, even one like the Apostles' Creed that is less clearly trinitarian than others (like the Nicene or Athanasian creeds). Still, some, like Steve Joel Moffett, apparently find trinitarianism within the creed: [The] common ...


6

St. Thomas Aquinas discusses various errors of Arius and his followers in his Commentary on Chapter 1 of Gospel of John that are connected to Prologue of Gospel of John. If Arius had something to say on that part of Gospel of John it is very reasonable to believe that Aquinas would mention it. Aquinas does not mention Arius in commentary on John 1:1, however ...


6

There are several denominations who believe that Jesus is a created being. Jehovah’s Witnesses are probably the most vocal in their belief that Jesus, in his pre-mortal existence, was created by Jehovah God as the mighty spirit creature known in heaven as Michael the archangel. It was the spirit of Michael who entered into the child born to Mary and who ...


5

Until the third century, the dichotomy of trinitarians and non-trinitarians just did not exist. Jesus was the Son of God, and that was as far as it went. The concept of the Trinity began to provide for the divinity of Jesus within a monotheistic framework. Around the beginning of the fourth century, a Libyan priest, Arius, began to teach that the Trinity was ...


5

I think this could be considered a type of modalism: the belief that there is only one person of God, who appears in different times or contexts as the father, son, and holy spirit, but does not by nature have true relations between these. In modalism, "father" and "son" are only labels for human benefit, not true descriptions of how God is, and so you could ...


4

It's easy to find individuals who deny salvation to non-Trinitarians: Are Non-Trinitarians saved? I always wondered this since they deny the true nature of God. Jehovahs witnesses and Mormons do not have the same Christ as the Bible but only God can judge. No. Anyone denying The Creator as He has revealed Himself, Triune, will ...


4

I agree with previous answers, but I would like to take a look at a different angle of the question. Asking about "non-Trinitarians" is extremely broad, since there are many groups from many different time periods. I will focus on one (albeit still extremely broad) group, namely, what would a (hypothetical) person in the Ancient Near East from the Israelite/...


4

I've come across a few different meanings. Here are three examples: Adoptionism: Jesus was born just a man, but was adopted as God's own Son. There are a few reasons that are given for this (simply from God's grace; Jesus was the supreme religious expert for two examples). Those who defend this position often point to Jesus's baptism as the moment that this ...


4

Historically, there was a small group of Anglican clergy in the late 18th and early 19th centuries who became convinced believers in and exponents of the non-trinitarian Christian theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772), but who, instead of separating from the Anglican Church, remained "non-separatists," continuing to serve as pastors of ...


4

In addition to the references in Staples' answer, there is a statement in the book of Doctrine & Covenants: The Father has a body of flesh and bones as tangible as man’s; the Son also; but the Holy Ghost has not a body of flesh and bones, but is a personage of Spirit. Were it not so, the Holy Ghost could not dwell in us. D&C 130:22 I'd also like ...


4

Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772) made several references to the Apostles' Creed in his theological writings, none of them negative. In general, he saw it as supporting his beliefs and teachings by demonstrating that they were held to among the earliest Christians. The more substantive references to the Apostles' Creed come late in his theological works, as ...


4

I am Christadelphian and don't have a particular problem with the apostle's creed. It doesn't mention or imply the trinity... that was added later in church doctrine in our opinion. If the church believed in the trinity at that time, then surely it would have been explicit in the creed? The accepted answer is wrong. It argues that because we don't agree with ...


4

I think this is a logical mistake more than a theological mistake, and I don't think this is a named heresy. If anything, it seems like a violation of the communication of properties; something reminiscent of patripassianism. The Shield of the Trinity (see below) is basically a picture version of the communication of properties, which sets up the ...


3

I think that the other answer you received, though it contains useful information, gives a misleading overall impression. Latter-day Saints don't use the Apostles' Creed, simply because it's not part of the revealed canon of Scripture. Most LDS are unaware it exists. (There are some more 'traditional' Christian churches which take a similar position on the ...


3

There is no evidence that Arius was influenced by Revelation 3:14 or Psalms 8:5-6, but he appealed to Bible verses such as Jesus saying that the father is "greater than I" (John 14:28), and "The Lord created me at the beginning of his work" (Proverbs 8:22). He was also influenced by Origen. Richard Smoley says in Forbidden Faith, page 45, Origen held an ...


3

There is a range of views and the Christology of each view can be quite complicated, but here is a potted version of some of them: While not ignoring his humanity, Oneness Pentecostals believe Jesus is the one and only indivisible God (cf. http://www.onenesspentecostal.com/christology.htm). Jehovah's Witnesses believe he is the archangel - the first-born ...


3

Virtually all Christians consider Jesus to be the image of God because of this passage in Colossians 1:15-16 The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created ...


3

Jesus is not the same person as The Father. It is a key part of Trinitarian doctrine that the Father and the Son (and the Spirit) are distinct persons. Therefore is is completely correct and proper that Jesus talks about The Father as someone other than himself. Likewise it is completely correct to call The Father "God" (just like it is completely correct ...


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