11

This answer is based on the following 3 resources I found: A 2015 article Was Constantine the Great Baptized An Arian? A 2012 paper The Spread Out of Arianism. A Critical Analysis of the Arian Heresy published in the International Journal of Orthodox Theology A 2005 article How Arianism Almost Won by Christopher A. Hall published in Christian History Issue ...


6

This response has been extracted from a longer article of mine on the subject (linked at the end) , hence the discontinuous numbering of its sections. 1. Ousía in Greek philosophical discourse Deriving then from the verb "to be", as we can see in [4] ousía enters the Greek philosophical discourse with Plato, who uses it to mean the primary, ...


4

The Wikipedia article on Hypostasis makes it clear that there was some confusion in terminology due to language difficulties of Latin, Greek and English. The concepts being referred to are confused by misunderstanding what 'substance' and 'essence' actually mean when applied to Divine Persons. It was mainly under the influence of the Cappadocian Fathers ...


4

Constantine The Great was not an Arian at all. In fact he was quite orthodox in his thought and to further this notion he is considered a saint in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. Regarding Eusebius of Nicomedia’s confession of faith prior to the baptism of Constantine and during the First Ecumenical Council of 325, John Karmiris writes: ...


3

Since the Council of Nicaea excommunicated Arius & Co., they were 'delivering them to Satan' as Paul describes exclusion from the Church - I Timothy 1:20 and 1 Corinthians 5:5. One can draw the conclusion that they belong to Satan and they are delivered up to him out of the fold of the flock. To bolster this, consider the words of Athanasius below, ...


2

I have been a practicing Catholic for 65 years and in all those years in multiple parishes and different dioceses I have NEVER heard the Apostles Creed used in place of the Nicene Creed except since the 2011 change made it optional for Lent and Easter seasons. I have lived in Europe for a few years and never heard the Apostles Creed used in place of the ...


2

On the surface, ancient-future churches claim to speak across generations and draw equally upon ancient (hymns, chant, candles, communion) and techno-modern (alt. rock, art, ambient, projection, video) sources. An American example of this would be the hi-tech megachurches that host anything from rock concerts to communions. Underneath that modern, millenial-...


1

I first came across the expression “Ancient and Future Church” while doing research into the Believers Eastern Church in India. A Wikipedia article about the founder said The Believers Eastern Church is an "Ancient-Future Church" and as such, is considered by some to be heretical. Source: https://www.wikiwand.com/en/K._P._Yohannan Further ...


1

J.N.D. Kelly Early Christian Creeds, “Of all existing creeds it is the only one for which ‘ecumenicity’...can be claimed.” Kelly devotes 35 pages to this Creed, and though unfair to his work to cite such a snippet, he writes near end of the Chapter, This creed seemed to...be the “faith of the Nicene Fathers”...dealing with the heresies of the ...


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