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Why were ousia and hypostasis synonymous in the Nicene Creed?

This response has been extracted from a longer article of mine on the subject (linked at the end) , hence the discontinuous numbering of its sections. 1. Ousía in Greek philosophical discourse ...
Johannes's user avatar
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11 votes
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Was Constantine The Great a Nicene Christian?

This answer is based on the following 3 resources I found: A 2015 article Was Constantine the Great Baptized An Arian? A 2012 paper The Spread Out of Arianism. A Critical Analysis of the Arian ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
8 votes
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According to Reformed theology, where is the Scriptural evidence for homoousion?

Before we get into the weeds, here are the main points that I intend to impart: Reformed theology generally accepts the church fathers' wisdom on the homoousion. The concept of homoousion, not the ...
Mr. Bultitude's user avatar
8 votes
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Does the Orthodox Church accept the Athanasian Creed?

For the Orthodox, there is precisely one Creed: the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed. That being said, it depends on what you mean by 'accept'. The theology of Quicunque Vult / (Pseudo-)Athanasian ...
bradimus's user avatar
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8 votes

Is the theory of Eternal Generation now redundant?

A classical example of the confusion that has arisen with some modern English translations of monogenēs, is in John 1:18. Some translations state it is a position that is being described, (being at ...
Anne's user avatar
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7 votes

What were the original languages of the Nicene Creed?

The lingua franca of the world during the early years of Christianity was Greek. Latin was the official language of Rome and used throughout the Empire for some official business, but even Rome used ...
Caleb's user avatar
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7 votes

Was the Nicene Creed accepted under duress?

Background There are several key details missing from the existing answers. Despite offering a bounty on this question to see about getting some more complete answers, no additional answers were ...
James Shewey's user avatar
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7 votes

What did "one baptism" in the Nicene Creed mean back then?

There is one body and one Spirit, just as you are called in one hope of your calling; One Lord, one faith, one baptism, One God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all. ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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6 votes
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When did the concept of οὐσία begin to refer to God's nature?

The earliest use of οὐσία to mean the substance or essence of a thing is by Aristotle in his Κατηγορίαι, though Aristotle attributes its earlier use to Plato. Justin Martyr comments on Aristotle's ...
Andrew's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the biblical support for the Nicene creed's statement of the Son being "eternally begotten"?

Lee Irons addresses this question in his paper, "The Eternal Generation of the Son." In response to the question of exegetical basis for the doctrine, he writes: Traditionally, the doctrine of the ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
6 votes

What did "one baptism" in the Nicene Creed mean back then?

What did "one baptism" in the Nicene Creed meant back then? Before going on I would like to point out a huge over looked historical fact about the First Council of Nicene of 325: The acts of ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
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5 votes
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In Catholicism, what are “all things visible & invisible”?

The Catechism of the Council of Trent explains "Of all Things Visible and Invisible" thus: What we have said, then, of the creation of the universe is to be understood as conveyed by the words ...
Geremia's user avatar
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5 votes

In Catholicism, what are “all things visible & invisible”?

Everything that is that is not God. The physical universe. Humans. Spiritual beings (angels and demons etc). CCC 325: The Apostles' Creed professes that God is "creator of heaven and earth"....
curiousdannii's user avatar
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5 votes
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Do Calvinists Disbelieve the Doctrine of Eternal Generation as a 'Begetting'?

The Calvinistic position, traditionally, is not that the Son is (as stated in the question) 'begotten of the Father before all ages', but, rather, that the Son is : eternally begotten of the Father....
Nigel J's user avatar
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5 votes

On what grounds was Arius refuted at the First Council of Nicaea?

The records of the 1st Ecumenical Council do not, I believe, include the discourse that preceded the condemnation against Arius and his followers. We do know, however, that Athanasius of Alexandria ...
guest37's user avatar
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5 votes

Why was the name of Pontius Pilate included in the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed?

According to this site it has to do with the importance of preserving the historicity of the event surrounding the execution of Jesus Christ. It says in part: The inclusion of Pilate’s name in the ...
Kris's user avatar
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5 votes

Does the phrasing in Nicene Creed cast doubt on the eternality of The Son of God?

From implies source or origin, not necessarily a temporal change. The phrasing God of God was meant to define the relationship of Son to God the Father; they both are one substance. Note that the ...
eques's user avatar
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5 votes

Does the phrasing in Nicene Creed cast doubt on the eternality of The Son of God?

The Nicene Creed conveys an eternal begetting - the only begotten Son. This begetting is not a matter of time, it is a matter of eternity. (Which is not 'a long period of time' it is another state ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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4 votes
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According to Roman Catholicism, what does "proceeds' mean in the Nicene Creed?

Divine Procession Fr. Hardon, S.J., gives a good definition of "divine procession:" The origin of a divine person from another through the communication of the numerically one divine ...
Geremia's user avatar
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4 votes
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How was the idea of homoousion developed, and when was this term used prior to the Nicean Council?

This seems to have been prompted by Greek Philosophy beginning about 600 BC. This is most pronounced in the teachings of Plato, specifically his Theory of Forms in Plato's cave allegory. Details In ...
James Shewey's user avatar
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4 votes
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What prompted the second century writers to adopt the concept of οὐσία to refer to God's nature?

This seems to have been prompted by Greek Philosophy beginning about 600 BC. This is most pronounced in the teachings of Plato, specifically his Theory of Forms in Plato's cave allegory. Details In ...
James Shewey's user avatar
  • 2,626
4 votes

Was Constantine The Great a Nicene Christian?

Was Constantine The Great a Nicene Christian? Constantine The Great was not an Arian at all. In fact he was quite orthodox in his thought and to further this notion he is considered a saint in both ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
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4 votes
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What were the Apostolic Fathers's contributions to Christology which survived to Nicene (325 AD) and Chalcedon (451 AD)?

Although they are a diverse group and should not be thought of as presenting a unified view, the Apostolic Fathers contributed to the development of Christology in several ways. Ignatius of Antioch is ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
4 votes

Why were ousia and hypostasis synonymous in the Nicene Creed?

The Wikipedia article on Hypostasis makes it clear that there was some confusion in terminology due to language difficulties of Latin, Greek and English. The concepts being referred to are confused by ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why was the name of Pontius Pilate included in the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed?

There had been a roiling dispute about the nature of Christ for centuries, indeed even today. Was He a good man, a prophet, a lunatic, "nothing" until His baptism (adoptionism), or truly ...
SLM's user avatar
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4 votes

Does the phrasing in Nicene Creed cast doubt on the eternality of The Son of God?

The creed explicitly denounces “those who say: 'There was a time when he was not;' and 'He was not before he was made.” In other words, according to the creed, He always existed. The creed also says ...
Andries's user avatar
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4 votes

In the 325 Nicene Creed, what is the meaning of "of" in the phrase, "He is of another substance or essence?"

That phrase was written both as a condemnation of individuals within the Church, and religious groups that maintained that Jesus Christ was "of another substance or essence". As you rightly ...
Anne's user avatar
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4 votes

Why has the phrase "from the ousia of the Father" been omitted from the Nicene Creed?

We believe in one God, the Father almighty, maker of all things visible and invisible; And in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the Son of God, begotten from the Father, only-begotten, that is, from the ...
Mike Borden's user avatar
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4 votes

Why was homoousios used in the Nicene Creed?

The Nicene Creed is the official doctrine of most Christian churches—the Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Churches, Church of the East, and Anglican Communion, as well as ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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