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Short answer By its very mechanism, mRNA technology cannot alter our DNA, but an entirely different technology can, such as CRISPR which is a candidate to make mankind resistant chromosomally. Furthermore, the role of an mRNA vaccine is ONLY to trigger natural immune system response to create necessary antibodies and memory T cells. The vaccine itself does ...


6

There are a number of points to address in this question. Transsexualism Confirming someone in sin Sins against charity There are lots of things in this answer which many people will find objectionable or hurtful or blind or disaffirming, but the question asks for the Catholic point of view. I’m also aware that there are always difficult cases, and this ...


5

I don't agree that this statement (that committing sin is contrary to human nature) is the basis of natural law. Natural law is a consequence of the way God constructed humans and the rest of the universe. It's what makes it wrong, for example, to kill someone; and we call it natural because everyone knows it, even if God hasn't directly revealed it to them. ...


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1 isn't really a question that we can answer. It's speculative. Are current mRNA vaccines a staging ground or first step on a slippery slope? You'd need to show that mRNA vaccines necessarily or at least very plausibly lead to transhumanism. As far as I am aware, mRNA vaccines can't change your genetic code, and that accords with the basic biology I learned ...


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Luther According to Steinmetz, David Curtis. 2002. Luther in Context. Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker Academic., Luther had no direct knowledge of the content St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica. Luther in Context ch. 5, "Luther Among the Anti-Thomists," begins: Did Luther know the theology of Thomas Aquinas? Historians, particularly Roman Catholic ...


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I don't think there is a definitive answer to your question as asked. You're not asking for an objective fact, like "what is the boiling point of hydrogen peroxide at sea level?" You're asking for a classification. Different people could classify the same things many different ways. Like suppose I asked you what different kinds of motor vehicle there are. If ...


3

To continue after the manner of Aquinas: On the contrary, Our Lord says (Mark 10:19) "You know the commandments: 'You shall not kill'." I answer: The natural law, as its name implies, is written into nature. It is given not only to those who have been baptized into the family of Christ, but to all rational beings: The natural law is written and engraved ...


2

In his book, First Comes Love, Scott Hahn outlines a concept of God that is in concert to this question. He cites a writing of Pope John Paul II. “In the light of the New Testament it is possible to discern how the primordial model of the family is to be sought in God Himself, in the Trinitarian mystery of His life. The divine “We” is the eternal ...


2

Generally speaking the intentions/motivations of the person make it right/wrong or allowable/forbidden. Sin has always been rebellion against God—generally speaking, doing something that you believe to be wrong. The Jews had some mandates about accidental sins, but with the atonement that Jesus made, I don't see how there's a need for any form of repentance ...


2

Where human rights come from Catholic understanding of natural law is the law that God implants in every human being when He creates human nature as opposed to animal nature. The human soul then is equipped with a conscience that informs reason to act according to what is proper to human nature. When someone thinks, feels, wills, or acts against human ...


2

In Catholic Republic written by author Timothy Gordon (page 38ff), he outlines there are only 3 rights directly under Natural Law: Right to Life, Right to Liberty and Right to Property, so one cannot directly say that according to natural law one has a right to privacy. However, that doesn't mean that from Natural Law, it would be perfectly moral to "...


2

Your nemesis(!) is at least partially right. Doctrinally, at least from an Evangelical perspective, he or she is spot on. The person's behavior, on the other hand, is far from Christ-like. Paul is quite clear in Romans that the Law of God is a good thing (as Martha Stewart is wont to say--except she leaves out the words about God's Law): So then, the ...


2

According a Catholic interpretation of the natural law, do individuals posses a right to privacy? The short answer is yes. To start with I am going to begin with the Natural Law in Catholic Social Teachings: Catholic Social Teachings Catholic social teachings from Leo XIII through John Paul II have been influenced in various ways, either by way of agreement ...


1

Secret/private vs. open is distinguished in moral theology. For example: Backbiting/detraction (detractio),the blackening of another's good name (fama) by words uttered in secret—St. Albert the Great, Sum. Theol. II 117, quoted in St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica II-II q. 73 a. 1 arg. 1It's a serious sin because one has a right to his good reputation (...


1

Probably his sin was "pride". He consider himself able to decide on other lives, and to establish which is good and which is not: only God can do it. Just like Adam and Eve after eating the forbidden fruit: they started to doubt God's knowledge of good and evil . It's the first sin, and maybe the worst.


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There is a good answer on the FAQ page for Grace Lutheran in Elgin, TX. A number of times, for example in the February 19, 2006 Biblog post commenting on Leviticus 13-15, you have said that some aspects of the law no longer apply to us. Can you explain how we know which parts of the law do still apply and which parts do not? A: A usual ...


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2 question are asked here and 2 assumptions are made. Assumption 1) Killing is wrong. If this were true in all cases, then accidents, suicides, self defense, killing during armed combat, abortion and other forms of premeditated murder would have the same gravity. Assumption 2) Suicide is wrong. This is true "suicide is always as morally objectionable as ...


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Charles Rice addresses this question more or less in his 50 questions on the Natural Law. (See q. 35). I'll try and synthesize it a bit while my new baby forms his or her conscience about whether or not today is a good day to be born. He mentions three reasons why your conscience is subjectively culpable (and, being subjective, not the same as anyone ...


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Consider the six days of creation, which in itself is a miracle. God spoke things into existence that did not exist before. Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear. (Hebrew 11:3) So to your question, yes, God has the ability to control elements (...


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Not all miracles can be explained by natural causes. A magician can bring a rabbit out of a hat as long as he has three things: some jiggery pokery, a hat, and a rabbit; but only God can bring an entire universe out of literally nothing. In the two miracles you especially mention, there are spiritual lessons to be learned which surely are more important to ...


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I found what maybe the perfect journal article that addresses your question: McNeill, John T. “Natural Law in the Teaching of the Reformers.” The Journal of Religion, vol. 26, no. 3, 1946, pp. 168–182. A copy can be found at JSTOR. Its 15 pages are divided into 4 sections treating Luther, Melanchthon, Zwingli, and Calvin individually. I believe the ...


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I am not an expert in quantum mechanics, and this is a christian stack exchange, so we should probably not write a formal mathematical description of the problem. However, I have thought about this problem before, worrying that it was somehow incompatible with the idea of an omniscient God. But, there is no reason to worry. The reason why the uncertainty ...


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