14

Yes, in the eyes of the Catholic Church, under the guidance of the Pontifical Council for the Family abortion has been likened to murder. The moral gravity of procured abortion is apparent in all its truth if we recognize that we are dealing with murder and, in particular, when we consider the specific elements involved. The one eliminated is a human ...


9

The bible is rather emphatic on the point actually. The universe we live in was not only created at God's command but it is sustained constantly through his active will. This sustainer is Jesus Christ: Colossians 1:15-17 (ESV) 15  He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16  For by him all things were created, in ...


7

Note: I am providing an exhaustive answer as it is difficult to find this subject being answered to any degree of depth anywhere. I think the answer can only be found by contrasting how these two covenants differ. These covenants largely differed: in their time in history, location, atmosphere, persons who inaugurated them, the persons who acted as ...


6

James Dolezol, a recent doctoral graduate of Westminster Seminary in Philadelphia, has written a book (which was his dissertation) on divine simplicity in which he traces the agreement of Reformed scholasticism to Thomist scholasticism on the doctrine of God. I have not yet read this book, but I was told about it by a friend of Dolezol's, and I listened to ...


6

One of the founding ideas of Protestantism was "sola scriptura", meaning that we view the Bible as the only ultimate authority. That doesn't mean that we refuse to read any other books. The existence of thousands of Baptist bookstores should be adequate proof that that's not true. What it means is that we do not view any book other than the Bible as having ...


6

There are a number of points to address in this question. Transsexualism Confirming someone in sin Sins against charity There are lots of things in this answer which many people will find objectionable or hurtful or blind or disaffirming, but the question asks for the Catholic point of view. I’m also aware that there are always difficult cases, and this ...


5

I'm not sure about an answer that applies to all of Christianity. but as it happens, the subject of obeying rules we think are dumb came up in Sunday School this very morning. So, from a Baptist perspective: Romans 13:1-2 (KJV) says 1 Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ...


4

The overly simple answer is: Natural Law is a human person's participation in the Eternal Law (the knowable part of which is called Divine Law). While Peter Turner's answer covered all of the essential points, St. Thomas Aquinas' coverage of the topic is the benchmark among the Doctors of the Catholic Church and one summary of it (among many, I am sure) ...


4

Luther According to Steinmetz, David Curtis. 2002. Luther in Context. Grand Rapids, Mich: Baker Academic., Luther had no direct knowledge of the content St. Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica. Luther in Context ch. 5, "Luther Among the Anti-Thomists," begins: Did Luther know the theology of Thomas Aquinas? Historians, particularly Roman Catholic ...


4

I don't agree that this statement (that committing sin is contrary to human nature) is the basis of natural law. Natural law is a consequence of the way God constructed humans and the rest of the universe. It's what makes it wrong, for example, to kill someone; and we call it natural because everyone knows it, even if God hasn't directly revealed it to them. ...


3

Any answer to this question will be pure speculation - the Bible doesn't say why there are these two "classes" (the question of the existence of said classes I'll leave alone for now), so we don't know. With that said, here are two potential reasons that are Scripturally based: God is sovereign over everything, and is pleased to work out his will through ...


3

Sin is absolutely objective but in its application in our lives has a subjective element. The particular case that you mention is where Paul is saying if a person thinks something is a sin (even though it is not) then it is a sin to that person if they run about doing what their conscience condemns. This is because anything done without faith is a sin: ...


3

The U.P. isn't a law about what can and can't be measured; it's a principle about what properties a particle actually has. A particle DOESN'T HAVE a precise position and a precise momentum at the same time. A particle DOESN'T HAVE an exact amount of energy at an exact time. The notion that a particle might have a precise position is a misconception, due ...


3

I don't think there is a definitive answer to your question as asked. You're not asking for an objective fact, like "what is the boiling point of hydrogen peroxide at sea level?" You're asking for a classification. Different people could classify the same things many different ways. Like suppose I asked you what different kinds of motor vehicle there are. If ...


3

To continue after the manner of Aquinas: On the contrary, Our Lord says (Mark 10:19) "You know the commandments: 'You shall not kill'." I answer: The natural law, as its name implies, is written into nature. It is given not only to those who have been baptized into the family of Christ, but to all rational beings: The natural law is written and engraved ...


2

The short answer to your question is to review the Haydock Commentary of the 3rd Chapter of Genesis. I feel like I should add more, but I'm not smart enough to top the incomparable Haydock commentary. Here are a couple short, relevant snippets: Ver. 1. Why hath God? Hebrew, "Indeed hath God, &c." as if the serpent had overheard Eve arguing with ...


2

In the eyes of natural moral law and the church direct abortion is tantamount to murder (whether the legislature agrees or not). Direct abortion is when one chooses to intentionally abort a fertilized egg. However, indirect abortion is not tantamount to murder. Indirect abortion is when one does something that is not intended to harm the child, but the ...


2

Aeoril says: "The idea of 'Natural Moral Law', if you are referring to the idea that one can discern moral truths from pure philosophical pursuits is something I would argue is untenable." I would suggest that you read Cicero's "De Legibus" ("On the Laws"). Within, you will find that Cicero arrives at many conclusions about of God and His law which ...


2

Sin is not an idea or a component of a "moral system". God's laws are not based on a notion of right or wrong, but are based on God's personal nature and therefore how He wants us to be. This doesn't mean that it's not wrong to sin - you can say to a degree that it invariably is wrong to sin - but to stress that sin itself isn't about good/bad, right/...


2

In his book, First Comes Love, Scott Hahn outlines a concept of God that is in concert to this question. He cites a writing of Pope John Paul II. “In the light of the New Testament it is possible to discern how the primordial model of the family is to be sought in God Himself, in the Trinitarian mystery of His life. The divine “We” is the eternal ...


2

Generally speaking the intentions/motivations of the person make it right/wrong or allowable/forbidden. Sin has always been rebellion against God—generally speaking, doing something that you believe to be wrong. The Jews had some mandates about accidental sins, but with the atonement that Jesus made, I don't see how there's a need for any form of repentance ...


2

Your nemesis(!) is at least partially right. Doctrinally, at least from an Evangelical perspective, he or she is spot on. The person's behavior, on the other hand, is far from Christ-like. Paul is quite clear in Romans that the Law of God is a good thing (as Martha Stewart is wont to say--except she leaves out the words about God's Law): So then, the ...


1

2 question are asked here and 2 assumptions are made. Assumption 1) Killing is wrong. If this were true in all cases, then accidents, suicides, self defense, killing during armed combat, abortion and other forms of premeditated murder would have the same gravity. Assumption 2) Suicide is wrong. This is true "suicide is always as morally objectionable as ...


1

Charles Rice addresses this question more or less in his 50 questions on the Natural Law. (See q. 35). I'll try and synthesize it a bit while my new baby forms his or her conscience about whether or not today is a good day to be born. He mentions three reasons why your conscience is subjectively culpable (and, being subjective, not the same as anyone ...


1

Consider the six days of creation, which in itself is a miracle. God spoke things into existence that did not exist before. Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear. (Hebrew 11:3) So to your question, yes, God has the ability to control elements (...


1

Not all miracles can be explained by natural causes. A magician can bring a rabbit out of a hat as long as he has three things: some jiggery pokery, a hat, and a rabbit; but only God can bring an entire universe out of literally nothing. In the two miracles you especially mention, there are spiritual lessons to be learned which surely are more important to ...


1

The Church has always upheld the State's right to protect its citizens, so my take on it is yes, life sentences are in accord as long as that is truly what is required to protect the people. Each specific case has to be considered individually, of course. [Edit] I've done some research in an attempt to find sources. Here is an interesting one: Catholic ...


1

What is and is not a sin is not subjective. Scripture gives a very clear definition of sin in 1 John 3:4. Sin is transgression of the Law. What is subjective is our understanding of what sin is. We're flawed finite creatures, with varying preconceptions, who are taught various different things (whether those things are right or wrong) and ...


1

Unless we have an understanding of philosophical methods, we would have no idea of the validity of any work claiming to be an exposition of the Bible. One could read the Summa, but unless you know how it lacks, it would be pointless. The Divine Law, its requirements, the right approach meet those requirements, all this require a proper understanding of the ...


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