23

In English, the appropriate non-gender pronouns are 'they' and 'them', but this construction is clumsy if people attempt to use it all the time. It simply does not work as a substitute. It does not adequately express person. Babies are sometimes referred to as 'it' because, I suppose, their personality is not yet apparent. But, no, it is not appropriate in ...


22

Actually, this is more Kabbalah than Christianity and has further roots in the occult and other non-Christian mysticism and folklore (Rumpelstiltskin comes to mind, which is a decidedly non-Christian story). The idea that knowing the name of a beast/demon/whatever gives you dominion over it came from the idea that naming a beast/demon/whatever showed your ...


21

A convention in many Bibles is to do exactly as you say - convert the Tetragrammaton (YHWH) into LORD. To be sure, you should look at your Bible's preface. In the New Testament, which was composed in Greek, the word Kurios (e.g. Kyrie Elesion) is a title as opposed to a Proper Name. To be clear: יהוה (Yahweh) = LORD - specific name, אֲדֹנָי (Adonai) = ...


21

The reason is that "Jehovah" (or any transliteration) does belong there, and in these specific cases, the replacement would sound strikingly incorrect. Exo 6:3: And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, but the Name of God Almighty, but by my name LORD was I not knowen to them If both occurences were to be understood as "title", "authority"...


20

There is a significant distinction between calling God "mother" and the Bible identifying aspects of motherhood (and fatherhood) as reflecting the glory and character of God. Both men and women reflect the glory and character of God in different ways, as men and women, fathers and mothers, teachers, judges, etc. However, God is spirit (John 4:23) and not ...


17

The word "Christ" is simply the English transliteration of the Greek word "Χριστός" (pronounced "khristós"). It has the same meaning as the word "Messiah" which is simply a loose English transliteration of the Hebrew word "מָשִׁיחַ" (pronounced "mashíach"). Therefore, you'll find the word "Christ" used in translations of the New Testament and the word "...


16

From "The Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels" Thus: “When E. Hiyya ben Adda died … R. Levi received his valuables. This was because his teacher used to say: ‘The disciple of bar nāšâ is as dear to him as his son.’ ” Here the expression plainly refers to the group of teachers It is suggested that the idiom was used as a form of self-reference in ...


16

You are confusing titles with proper names. Yesh'ua (Heb.) is rendered "Jesus" or "Joshua" today. It is his given name. It means "Jehovah Saves." Christos (Greek) is a title translating the Hebrew "Messiah" or "Annointed One." It highlights his annointed and special status. Immanuel (Heb.) is a simple Hebrew construction that says "God is with us." It is ...


14

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, (Matthew 28:19, NIV) I charge you, in the sight of God and Christ Jesus and the elect angels, to keep these instructions without partiality, and to do nothing out of favoritism. (1 Timothy 5:21, NIV) The core difference is ...


13

David, of course, was the second King of Israel (later just Judah) who had descendants also upon the throne. We see that Jesus was indeed descended in direct lineage from David through many generations. In some cases in the Bible, "son of" is used to refer to descendants rather than literal sons. Thus, Jesus could be called a "son of David". But because of ...


12

We should refer to God in the manner God wants us to refer to God (not using a pronoun here intentionally). The first time we see a pronoun for God is in Genesis 1:5 (NASB) 1:5 God called the light day, and the darkness He called night and there was evening and there was morning, one day. Now one might say that this is how Moses (considered the author ...


9

The Hebrew letters roughly corresponding to YHWH are the name of the Jewish god. Literally, this is their god's name, just like my name is Kyralessa and your name is Rachel. However, in order to avoid using God's name in vain, the Jews did not pronounce this name. Instead, they substituted the Hebrew word adonai, which means "lord". In the actual Hebrew ...


9

For the Catholic Church and other Nicene churches (the Eastern Orthodox, the Oriental Orthodox, the Armenian Orthodox, the Assyrians; as well as the majority of Protestants), the divine name YHWH (which is closely linked to the expression “I am” or “I Am Who I Am” (see Ex. 3:14), applies to God in His divine nature—hence to all three Persons of the Trinity. ...


9

There seem to be two basic questions here: In the original Hebrew manuscripts; the writer uses the word Elohim....From my research it seems 'Eloheim' doesn't exist in the Hebrew nor English vocabulary. Of course, in the "original Hebrew" manuscripts, no vowels were written, so technically no distinction could be drawn between these two forms. On the ...


8

I’ll try to answer the question from a Catholic perspective and, additionally, provide some supplementary information about what has been mentioned in the comments. The general answer to the question is “no”. First, God is Almighty, both before and after His revelation to us. So you can’t exercise power over Him. We can do wonders in Jesus’ name, but only ...


8

At the onset, I guess it is essential to state that Son of God is same as God nothing more or less. Son of God is “of God.” The claim to be of the same nature as God—to in fact be God. God took a human birth and that’s how the title “Son” came to him though He was Himself is God. God though divine is revealed in human nature to man. Jesus Christ is the ...


7

Jesus claimed both to be God and to be the Son of God. Jesus claimed that he is God. John 10:28-33 (NIV) 28 I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one will snatch them out of my hand. 29 My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand. 30 I and the Father are one.” ...


7

Jehovah is an English rendition of the proper name of God from the Hebrew Bible, also rendered "Yahweh" or YHWH, which means I AM and is referred to as "The Tetragrammaton". It isn't specific to Jehovah's Witnesses, and can be found in many older English translations of the Bible. In the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) the doctrine of the Trinity isn't really ...


7

This is a powerful assertion of Deity by Jesus. You are correct that it is, in fact, Jesus Himself who is speaking here and not the Father. That is made clear in this passage, as Jesus was the One who "was dead" and is now "alive forevermore". 17 When I saw Him, I fell at His feet like a dead man. And He placed His right hand on me, saying, “Do not be ...


7

You are close: 'El Shama is what you are looking for. Shama means "to hear" (Strong's) and is found in Psalm 17:6, as you mention. Furthermore, the name Ishmael is derived from these two words: And the angel of the Lord said to her, “Behold, you are pregnant and shall bear a son. You shall call his name Ishmael, because the Lord has listened to your ...


7

It may be helpful first to understand exactly what is mean by the word "vain." The NOAD defines vain as "producing no result, useless" and "having no meaning or likelihood of fulfillment." The use of God's name is usually reserved for prayer. Calling upon God is meant to have some kind of effect, but only if the caller is penitent and sincere. If the use ...


7

Here is a basic answer: In Exodus 3:14, אֶֽהְיֶה (eh-yeh, a form of the Hebrew verb "to be") is used as part of what today would be considered a folk etymology of the most sacred Hebrew name of God, called the "Tetragrammaton": יהוה as it appears in the original unpointed (no vowels) Hebrew manuscripts. Eh-yeh is not itself the commonly used name for God in ...


7

Messiah comes from Hebrew, Christ from Greek. Both mean anointed one. The anointing in the Old Testament was with oil and was done in God's name to someone as a symbol of God's choosing that person to be either King (1 Samuel 10:1; 1 Samuel 16:13; 2 Samuel 1:14-16) or High Priest (Exodus 30:30). Cyrus, a foreign king, is given the title, as one chosen ...


7

whether Latter Day Saints worship a god that was once a man Yes God himself was once as we are now, and is an exalted man....He was once a man like us;1 Heavenly Father who begat spirit children, including Jehovah who came to earth as Jesus and Michael who came to earth as Adam or whether the Eternal Father is different to Heavenly Father. “Man, ...


6

From the Catholic Encyclopedia: There has been a theological controversy over the question as to whether baptism in the name of Christ only was ever held valid. Certain texts in the New Testament have given rise to this difficulty. Thus St. Paul (Acts 19) commands some disciples at Ephesus to be baptized in Christ's name: "They were baptized in ...


6

The Nicene Creed (Wikipedia: "It forms the mainstream definition of Christianity for most Christians.") answers this question (emphasis added): And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, begotten of his Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with ...


6

Jesus was hailed as the Messiah - the "Anointed One" (in Greek 'Christos' from which we get Christ). The Messiah was thought to be the one who would restore the kingdom of Israel. (Which, of course, Christians believe he did in the heavenly sense, but not the earthly sense.) You anoint a King, of course, which is where the confusion begins. Indeed, the "...


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