24

Word origin As stated in previous answers, the "X" in "Xmas" comes from the Greek word for Christ, Χριστός. However, since precision is important, I want to clarify when the abbreviation was first used in English. The 1511 date comes from the Oxford English Dictionary entry for ''Xmas'', which reads: 1551 in E. Lodge Illustr. Brit. ...


21

This is, as noted, primarily a question about Semitic languages in the First Century. However, as it happens, there is a Biblical record of the relationship between the Semitic name yĕhôšūaʿ and the Greek Iēsous, the diachronic shift that produced yēšûaʿ, and the equation of yēšûaʿ with Iēsous.1 Background The New Testament is in Koine Greek. Jesus's ...


19

Great Britain monks used "X" for "Christ" nearly a thousand years ago. They used "X" for "Christ" while transcribing manuscripts in Old English. They did so because the Greek word for Christ, ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ, begins with the letters "chi" (or “X”) and "rho" (or "P"). And the monks used either "X" or "XP" in writing as an abbreviation for "Christ." The first ...


14

Your question seems to be referring to: And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved. - Acts 4:12 ESV Which in context is referring to the name given in verse 10: let it be known to all of you and to all the people of Israel that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom ...


11

"Christ" is from the Greek "christos," which means anointed - it's the same as the Hebrew Messiah. "Christ" as such is solely a title, though it has come to be both a title and a name; you can see it rather clearly in some of Paul's writings. Jesus is not just a christ but is the Christ. It identifies Him, and is therefore a name.


10

The word "Christ" is derived from the Greek translation of the Hebrew word (that is commonly rendered as) "Messiah"; it means "anointed". So "Jesus Christ" means "Jesus the Messiah" or "Jesus the anointed One". The phrase "Christ the Lord" could be understood as "The anointed One, the Lord" but I suspect it's actually a case of people using "Christ" as a ...


10

What does it mean to pray "in Jesus' name"? Is it a magical formula that guarantees that your prayer will be heard? For example: Dear God, please give me a new bike and a chocolate cake and a magical telephone and an elephant. Also, please kill all the bad people. In Jesus' name, Amen. Does that prayer make more sense because it has "In ...


9

God does answer every prayer, but the answer may be “No, I don’t think so.” Mgr Robert Mercer said as much in a sermon (at the funeral of a priest who, gravely ill, died a few days after ordination): It goes without saying that we are disappointed that God gave no miracle of healing. Jenny and Philip went to Walsingham. They prayed. We all prayed. Doctors ...


9

1. Question Restatement : Is there textual / literary evidence that "Jesus" is a name derived from "Zeus"? What is the Etymology of the Name, "Jesus"? 2. Answer - The Names Jesus and Zeus are not Related Etymologically : The Greek Septuagint Translation of the Hebrew Old Testament is the clearest evidence that the name "Jesus" is absolutely a ...


8

I'm pretty sure this is just a typesetting decision---more akin to using quotation marks. For example, when the Gospels say what was written on the sign above Jesus' cross, they tend to typeset the message in all caps: And the superscription of His accusation was written over, THE KING OF THE JEWS. Mk 15:26 And a superscription also was written over Him in ...


7

As some existing answers and comments already note, the boundary between a "name" and a "title" can be murky or fluid. Another possibility has recently been argued at length by Matthew Novenson in his book, Christ among the Messiahs: Christ Language in Paul and Messiah Language in Ancient Judaism (OUP, 2012). He spends 30+ pages on the question, attempting ...


6

The reason why Jesus is pronounced with the J sound we have in English today is because the letter I as a consonant in early Old French shifted to the J pronunciation we have in English today through palatization and affrication. The pronunciation of Biblical names in English that begin with a J was taken over from French in early Middle English. So even ...


6

The Greek letter Χ <"chi"> is the first letter in the word Χριστός < Christ >. It was often used in the past for easier transcription of scripture (from Greek to English). There is nothing wrong with using it, but the common mortal on the street most likely does not know its origin. Just use "Christmas".


6

I don't believe we know (yet). As soon as possible? President Nelson says: And some said it couldn’t be done, so why even try? ... It was the Savior Himself who said, “For thus shall my church be called in the last days, even The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.” So that's it: The Lord decreed that His Church will be called by ...


6

Why does the Catholic Church not celebrate the Feast of Naming of Jesus? Who says we do not? Those who follow the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, celebrate it under the title of the Feast of the Circumcision of Our Lord, on January 1st, the Octave Day of Christmas. Moreover it also celebrates the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus. According to the 1962 ...


5

There are certainly many names and titles by which the Messiah is called. As well as "Emmanuel", Isaiah has in 9:6 (ESV): For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Aquinas says (...


5

The term "using God's name in vain" comes from the Ten Commandments, which were given to Moses in the Old Testament: "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain" (Exodus 20:7, KJV). The New International Version renders it as follows: "You shall not misuse the name of the Lord your God" (Exodus 20:7, NIV). For there to be an incorrect ...


4

You are overlooking several very important points in your question. Jesus was telling this to his disciples, who he knew were going to establish his Church, and it can be said that he was telling them that he would provide all they needed for that purpose. It also is true for us today, but you have to remember that that promise was primarily made in ...


4

Part of this, too, has to do with the language spoken by the first missionaries to visit a particular area. Different languages transliterate sounds form other languages in different ways, even within the same area. So to render the name "John", an Italian would use Giovanni, a Spaniard would use Juan, a Portugese would use John, a Dutchman would use Jan, a ...


4

The actual pronunciation of the tetragrammaton is up for debate. If a person leaned toward "Yahweh" or "Yehovah," we wouldn't have a problem with that. But "Jehovah" is the most accepted version in English, and a viable translation. Jesus is an acceptable English translation OF the greek version (Iesous) of a name that would more directly be ...


4

There are several evidences that New Testament was written in Aramaic. First century Israel spoke Aramaic. Not Greek. Jewish Historian and Priest Josephus tells us that Greek wasn't spoken in first century Israel and also "the extreme rarity" in terms of a Jew knowing Greek. Josephus wrote: "I have also taken a great deal of pains to obtain the learning of ...


4

I've come across a few different meanings. Here are three examples: Adoptionism: Jesus was born just a man, but was adopted as God's own Son. There are a few reasons that are given for this (simply from God's grace; Jesus was the supreme religious expert for two examples). Those who defend this position often point to Jesus's baptism as the moment that this ...


4

I agree with previous answers, but I would like to take a look at a different angle of the question. Asking about "non-Trinitarians" is extremely broad, since there are many groups from many different time periods. I will focus on one (albeit still extremely broad) group, namely, what would a (hypothetical) person in the Ancient Near East from the Israelite/...


4

Jesus is a translation of the Greek Ιησούς. It is the Greek version of the Hebrew ישוע (Yeshua). ישוע (Yeshua) comes from the Hebrew יהושע which is transliterated Yehoshu. This is translated as Joshua. Jesus spoke Hebrew at that time, as well as most Jews. Peter is a translation of Πέτρος (Pétros). This is a Greek version of the Hebrew כיפא (Keypha') which ...


4

"For if Joshua had given them rest, He would not have spoken of another day after that."  Hebrews 4:8 "εἰ γὰρ αὐτοὺς ᾿Ιησοῦς κατέπαυσεν, οὐκ ἂν περὶ ἄλλης ἐλάλει μετὰ ταῦτα ἡμέρας."  Hebrews 4:8 The easiest way to see the connection is to see that the Greek name "Jesus" really is the name Joshua in the Hebrew. This can be seen in Acts 7:45 ...


4

In the Old Testament, the legendary military leader who led the conquest of the Promised Land was called Joshua, an English transliteration of the Hebrew יְהוֹשׁ֫וּעַ (Yĕhôshúʿa). In the Greek Septuagint (LXX), a pre-Christian translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, this name is always translated Ἰησοῦς - as we see, for example, here: Joshua 1:10: καὶ ...


4

On June 29, 2008, Cardinal Francis Arinze, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, wrote to the presidents of all conferences of bishops, prohibiting use of the term Yahweh in the liturgy, particularly in hymns and Psalm translations. The same reasons should also apply to Yeshua the Hebrew name of Jesus. Here is ...


4

March 5th, 2019, the church issued this: Websites: The Church’s official website will become ChurchofJesusChrist.org. This change is effective today, March 5, 2019, when the domain name ChurchofJesusChrist.org begins pointing to the LDS.org home page. In the coming months, the ChurchofJesusChrist.org domain name will replace what were the ...


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