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45

Simply put: Contemporary worship services stereotypically include both free-form prayers and music accompanied by guitars. Traditional worship services stereotypically include the recitation of set prayers, and do not use guitars. In the joke, Mary makes a slippery-slope argument: that if she diverges from what is "traditional" in one area (changing ...


21

Yes. Matthew 26:30 and Mark 14:26 both state: When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives. "They" here refers to Jesus and His disciples. It occurred immediately after The Last Supper.


19

Newton did indeed have issues with Handel's Messiah, so much so that in 1784–85 he gave a series of 50 sermons at his own church (St. Mary Woolnoth) in response to the oratorio being played at Westminster Abbey as part of a commemoration festival of Handel's 100th birthday. His stated goal was to preach on the Scriptural passages found in the lyrics of the ...


16

I'm familiar with a couple different schools of thought on this. Doubtless there are others as well. The first comes from Greek Orthodox tradition. I can't really speak to it directly, but a quick google search turned up a result indicating that it might have more to do with history and wanting to separate themselves from pagan worship. But there's ...


15

Might this be your quote? "The organ in the worship is the insignia of Baal" (Martin Luther, Mcclintock & Strong's Encyclopedia Volume VI, page 762) This phrase turns up 1,400 results in Google; but it may not be accurate. One researcher, apparently familiar with Luther and this quote, had this rebuttal: Strong DOES NOT use the word “insignia,” ...


15

Clear statements against the use of prerecorded music have been made by the National Association of Pastoral Musicians ("On the Use of Pre-Recorded Music in the Liturgy") and Paul S. Jones (Singing and Making Music). Both emphasize two arguments: Authentic worship requires active participation Recordings are static and inflexible Authentic worship through ...


13

The source appears to be mostly St. Athanasius, who was a deacon in Alexandria at the time the Arian controversy broke out (and later the bishop of the same see). He writes in his Discourses Against the Arians (Discourse 1, Chapter 1, 4) For of the one [i.e., a certain Sotades, who apparently wrote songs] has Arius imitated the dissolute and effeminate ...


12

Pope Pius X issued a motu proprio in 1903, Tra le Sollecitudini: 15. Although the music proper to the Church is purely vocal music, music with the accompaniment of the organ is also permitted. In some special cases, within due limits and with proper safeguards, other instruments may be allowed, but never without the special permission of the Ordinary, ...


11

I contacted the Valdensian Seminary in Rome and got this reply, from Lothar Vogel, professor of Church History: Dear Mr. Gunther, I thank you very much for your kind request and for your interest in Waldensian history. I can tell you that there are no sources concerning medieval Waldensian hymns or liturgies linked to Eucharistiv ...


10

Latter-day Saints in other countries do not typically sing United States patriotic songs. The full LDS hymnbook is currently published in 38 languages. The English hymnbook has 341 hymns, including four patriotic songs: America the Beautiful (USA) My Country, ’Tis of Thee (USA) The Star-Spangled Banner (USA) God Save the King (United Kingdom) For a short ...


9

The acoustic (non-electric) guitar is an instrument with a very soft dynamic range relative to most other instruments, such as the organ, or wind instruments, and is not effective in leading large assemblies in worship. The electric guitar was invented in 1931, but the electric signal from the guitar required amplifiers to increase the volume of the sound, s ...


8

This website gives a general idea about what some of the Churches of Christ teach about music in worship. As a result of the distinctive plea of the church - a return to New Testament Faith and practice - acappella singing is the only music used in the worship. This singing, unaccompanied by mechanical instruments of music, conforms to the music ...


8

Worship styles are highly contentious within many churches. Several years ago our music minister died and when we replaced him, his successor started singing more contemporary songs than hymns. Eventually things settled down (with some unwritten rules observed to keep the peace), but there was a long and drawn out internal drama that played out there. The ...


7

It's very ancient! Song has been used in worship since before the Psalms were written, and certainly continued into New Testament times. And through Christian history to the present. See Psalm 81 (among lots of other references): 81:1Sing aloud to God our strength; shout for joy to the God of Jacob! 2 Raise a song, sound the timbrel, the sweet ...


7

During the St. Gregory I papacy (590–604) this form of music was collected and codified, and was (and still is) strictly linked to the liturgy. In this sense, this is not just a style of music, but it goes together with the Mass and the prayer of "The canonical hours", consisting of eight prayer services: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, ...


6

As I've read in several books on worship (see below), the basis for this belief goes back to the roots of various kinds of music in African tribal music. The reasoning goes that since the tribal music was demonic (by intention), therefore its successors must have a demonic back-beat. However, I once read a senior thesis by a student at New St. Andrews ...


6

Paul's Greek was ψαλμοις, υμνοις and ωδαις πνευματικαις. Thayer's Greek Lexicon (via Blue Letter Bible) has ύμνος, -ου, ο, in Greek writing from Homer down, a song in praise of gods, heroes, conquerors, [cf. Trench as below, p297], but in the Scriptures of God; a sacred song, hymn. Thayer quotes Richard Chevinix Trench's Synonyms of the New Testament: ...


6

Byzantine Modes What does each individual mode convey? What are the goals of expression? First, I have to explain one small part of the music. Modes 1-4 in Byzantine music, are each a unique scale, while modes 5-8 are a derivation of such, being called Plagal modes. Most often the modes are called 1st-4th mode, and then Plagal First mode, Plagal Second ...


5

Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty (2 Corinthians 3:17); therefore it is not God's intention that you are obligated to do something with which you are uncomfortable, but feel free to worship God via a different expression. For example, David danced before the Lord (2 Samuel 6:14). For singing in church: Jesus sang with the disciples in Mark ...


5

We recently hired a new music director who has fired up this debate in our parish. As a result I did some research: Musicam Sacram section VI, 63 states that any instruments can be approved if the bishop is okay with it, the instrument can add to the sanctity of the music, not bringing to mind secular subjects, and it is commonly accepted. I read this to ...


5

Much like the definition on this site, the definition of a "Christian" artist tends to be "any group that claims itself as such." Much of the rise of Western Music can be attributed to the harmonization of the mass and other sacred music - Bach would sign his work "S.D.G," sola Dei gloria - for God's glory alone - but he is rarely considered a "Christian ...


5

The books you want are the "Kyriale" and the "Graduale". The former contains the words and music for the ordinary of the mass (Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei), and the latter contains the words and music for the variable parts of the mass (Introit, Gradual, Alleluia verse, Offertory, and Communion verse).


5

What the Bible says For starters, the Bible says in (Psalm 100: 1,2) 1 Make a joyful noise unto the Lord, all ye lands. 2 Serve the Lord with gladness: come before his presence with singing. RC Doctrine and reaction Doctrine will be addressed later on, I'll start with reaction to the piece since its release. Whatever reservations or objections the ...


5

Sacred music is "to arouse man's devotion towards God". God has no needs, being perfect in Himself. Addressing "Whether God should be praised with song?," St. Thomas Aquinas answers: As stated above (a. 1),* the praise of the voice is necessary in order to arouse man's devotion towards God. Wherefore whatever is useful in conducing to this result is ...


4

The accepted answer is an excellent response, however, the only biblical basis for prohibition of instruments is the "silence of the scriptures" argument. The argument states that if the Bible is absolutely silent on a given action, then that action is prohibited. Note that for many who use the argument, any concept of "permissive silence" is not silence ...


4

Short answer: ask the pastor and/or worship leader in your local church. Long answer: The Evangelical Free Church is an association of churches, which is less binding than a true denomination. As such, each individual church has a great deal of autonomy in the everyday workings of the local church. My brother and my father are both pastors at EFCA ...


4

The answer to your question is "Psalty's sleepytime helpers". There are a bunch of volumes, but one of them have the "be kind one to another" song on it!


4

I listened to a lot of this type of music as a kid. These kids musical albums, featuring kids singing the songs and some sort of story that runs in between the songs, were very popular in the 80s. Churches and Christian schools often performed these as stage productions with kids. Some of the more notable producers of these Christian kids musicals include:...


4

This is similar to a perennial question raised on a couple of Email lists devoted to Anglican and Catholic church music to which I subscribe, and ultimately comes down to the definition of "sacred music". In the email lists, it was found impossible to agree on a rigorous definition, but it was generally agreed that we could identify it when we heard it. One ...


4

I don't have any particular knowledge of which hymnal Gordon Clark was referring to, but on a hunch, I consulted my copy of "Christian Science Hymns" [1952 Edition], edited by Mary Baker Eddy's successors, and find that the text of Holy, Holy, Holy included there has the modifications you cite. Stanzas one and three have as the final line of the stanza, "...


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