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7

Ends do not justify means. It is never permissible to do evil so that good may come about: "let us not do evil that there may come good" (Rom. 3:8). Sin sometimes must be tolerated in order to prevent a greater evil. St. Thomas Aquinas's answer to the question of "Whether the rites of unbelievers ought to be tolerated?" (Summa Theologica ...


5

In the canon of scripture the answer is not stated, but in the book of Jasher it is. I suppose most would not consider it doctrine since it is not in the current Bible, but in the book of Jasher it states: And Cain hastened and rose up, and took the iron part of his ploughing instrument, with which he suddenly smote his brother and he slew him, and Cain ...


2

Exodus 20:13 (NIV) “You shall not murder. Exodus 20:13 (KJV) Thou shalt not kill. The meaning* of the Hebrew word for "kill/murder" used in this verse has a wide range of meanings as explained in this article. The act of killing in a warfare is not what this 6th commandment means. The commands for the killings in the Old Testament had proper reasons. ...


2

A recent biographer of St. Thomas, Jean-Pierre Torrell, says in Saint Thomas Aquinas. Volume I, The Person and His Work (Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2005), p. 294: The rumor must have circulated rather widely; the chronicler Giovanni Villani and Dante Alighieri himself echo it. It seems that all the historians are in agreement ...


2

Your question starts with a couple of assumptions that don't hold up. First, the earliest Christians had plenty of heated disagreements, starting with doctrinal conflicts over the extent to which the Law of Moses was binding (or not) on Gentile believers. Chapter 15 of Acts, and the whole of Paul's letter to the church at Galatia, record those issues. ...


2

I haven't taken a look at the other question yet, but after reading your question, my knee-jerk reaction was, "whaaaat?" The word "pardon" does not exist in LDS doctrine outside of the "Unpardonable Sin." The one and only person who can issue a "pardon" is Jesus Christ Himself. Per D&C 64:10... I, the Lord, will ...


2

According to Catholicism, is it sinful to physically harm abortion doctors or expectant mothers in order to prevent them from having an abortions? The short answer is yes. The big objection with your example is it is the mothers to be who are are going to such doctors. Should they also be the ones to be harmed or even sterilized in order to stop future ...


1

From "Moral Theology" by Fr. Heribert Jone (a book that was recommended to me by a traditional Catholic priest), Section 215 on self-defense: "One may defend the life and possessions of others even as he may defend his own." So when and to what extent may I defend my own life? From the same book: "An unjust aggressor may be killed if the following ...


1

Who was the first person on record who was killed by a Christian or group of Christians for religious disagreements? Undoubtedly the answer to this question would seem to be lost to history. Nevertheless we can go back into the first few centuries of Christianity for a glimmer of evidence to make an answer. The first person who was murdered by some Christian ...


1

Questions like these can get tricky because they're all about semantics. Pardon sin and forgive sin are used interchangeably throughout the scriptures and as used by church leaders. Also, I would also like to mention that I'm not exactly sure how doctrinal my answer below will be due to the lack of information on the subject of pardon vs forgive, but ...


1

Although an answer from the Book of Jasher has been given, Pseudo-Jonathan's targum (Aramaic paraphrase of the Tanakh with commentary) says Cain drove a stone into Abel's forehead, killing him.


1

The weapon itself is never stated, though there are many potential options. Often, I've heard it said that Cain used the jawbone of an ass, but this is likely a conflation of stories with Sampson. While searching for the verses, I found an interesting possible answer, however it all comes down to a guessing game. According to the linked guess, Cain killed ...


1

In the Old Testament, when God ordered the Israelites to kill various groups of people, the people being killed were always under judgement from God for their sins. The Canaanites were particularly evil people who practiced idolatry, including brutal infant sacrifices. As such, it could be argued that the people were guilty under the law and therefore, ...


1

Lamech is trolling on Facebook! We know is that the earth was exceedingly violent and wicked in those days, and so we generally assume that Lamech was a prominent person in this culture, but aside from that we don't know a great deal about this Lamech. To understand a bit better what he was really saying, maybe we need to compare his boast with Isaiah 14:...


1

the reason for a seventy fold curse is because Lamech killed someone who was attacking him. It's not important who it was because that isn't the point of the passage. The point is to show that if someone who took revenge on Cain; (who was an unrighteous murderer) were to suffer a 7 fold curse then the person who took revenge on Lamech (who only killed in ...


1

I have also been curious about Lamech... It seems to me that he did kill Cain and the remark to his wounding was "blindness" the same MARK that was given to Cain to protect him from the horrors of the wilderness - Cursed to wander the earth forever for the murder of Abel... Lamech also mentions the young man to his hurt... This is his son Jabal whom was ...


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