7

The short answer is “not necessarily”. “Conscious” denial of the Gospel is not the same thing as denial “with full knowledge.” “Grave matter” vs. “mortal sin” In Catholic moral theology, a distinction is made between the objective gravity of an action, and a person’s subjective culpability. For example (to name an action that everyone agrees is gravely ...


7

Is someone strapping you to a chair, propping your eye's open, and forcing you to watch pornography? If not, then you certainly have freely chosen to watch it and doing so certainly is a mortal sin because: Pornography constitutes grave matter.The sex slave / pornography industry is incredibly inhumane; giving material support to it is itself a sin. You ...


6

"If a sin can be dispensed, is it really a sin?" No, a sin which is dispensed of could never be a sin, because a sin is an offense to God, and offending God can never be excused. "Does the Church have the power to declare that something is now a sin which was not previously a sin, and to declare that something is no longer a sin which was previously a sin?"...


6

There is no such distinction between "mortal" and "venial" sin in the fashion you suggest within the Eastern Orthodox Church, but it must also be understood that sin, as well as the related concepts of grace and free will, is understood completely differently in the Orthodox Church. Sin, within the Eastern Orthodox Church, is seen as a ...


5

Short answer: For the general case, no. Your question asks about both the general case, and an outlier case of suicide. That series of articles in the Catechism addresses in part whether or not the disordered act of suicide is with full consent of the will, or is not with full consent of the will. If it is not then it may not meet the gravity of mortal ...


5

AthanasiusOfAlex's answer is long, thorough, and well-referenced, in my opinion. Here I'd like simply to offer a brief summary, in light of some of the current (2016-08-12 18:34 GMT) comments: Case 1 Someone voluntarily receives baptism, or receives baptism at the desire of their guardians: If such a person truly believes those things the Church teaches to ...


4

The objection is irrelevant. A decision on a matter that serious does not happen in isolation. CCC 1857 For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: "Mortal sin is sin whose object is grave matter and which is also committed with full knowledge and deliberate consent." Put in the vernacular: so ya knew it was wrong and ya did ...


3

Does a priest have to consume the Eucharist no matter the state of his soul? Can a priest decide not to consume the Eucharist during mass if in doubt whether he is in mortal sin? The short answer is no. The celebrant must always consume the sacred host at mass, in which he acted as a consecrator of the sacred species. Moreover, the celebrant's Communion is ...


3

Here is a quote from Dr. Bruce Milne, formerly lecturer in Biblical and Historical Theology at Spurgeon’s College, London. The Foreword to his book is by J.I. Packer. I believe this is still the current Reformed Protestant view: Recent interpretation sees the sin as essentially Christological. Jesus distinguished between sin against the Spirit and sin ‘...


3

I am trying to supplement Ken Graham's excellent answer because zippy2006 says it has not addressed the core issue posed in the question. My purpose is more of giving perspective, not trying to be canon lawyer, theologian, liturgist, or procedural expert. "If an obligation that would ordinarily bind under pain of mortal sin can be dispensed with, then ...


3

TL;DR: no, for the same reason that one can't be "a little bit pregnant." I am going to answer in reverse order, since going to mass or not seems to be the active ingredient of this question. Making the best of a difficult situation Is going to mass beneficial to him? Yes, going to mass is still beneficial to someone in a state of sin. By attending ...


2

If the non-Catholic is not baptized, the non-Catholic has original sin and is damned, "unless before the end of life the same have been added to the flock," as Pope Eugene IV puts it in his Cantate Domino. If the non-Catholic is baptized, he does not have original sin, but he can certainly commit actual sins (mortal or venial). Cain and Onan—who committed ...


2

If a sin can be dispensed, is it really a sin? Let us first of all recall what Our Lord said to St. Peter, our first pope and head of the Catholic Church: 19 And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. - ...


2

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. The Eighth Commandment condemns lying. Because God is regarded as the author of all truth, the Church believes that humans are obligated to honor the truth. The most obvious way to fulfill this commandment is not to lie — intentionally deceive another by speaking a falsehood. So a good Catholic is who ...


2

Scriptural basis Exodus 20:8: Remember that thou keep holy the sabbath day. cf. Kellner's Heortology § 2. Sunday and its Observance as a Day of Rest (pp. 6-13) Holy Office's March 4, 1679, condemned proposition 52 DZ 1202: The precept of keeping feast days is not obligatory under pain of mortal sin, aside from scandal, if contempt be absent. Hearing Mass ...


2

I don't know if there has been a solemn definition of the doctrine by a pope or council, but this definition is part of the deposit of faith. It is defined exactly as you state in the Catechism of the Catholic Church in point 1857, and the distinction between venial and mortal sin is also defined in point 1854. Point 1854 states: "Sins are rightly evaluated ...


2

A heretical, schismatic, or excommunicated priest can consecrate because (III q. 82 a. 7 ad 3): in consecrating the sacrament he speaks as in the person of Christ, Whose place he holds by the power of his orders His ability to consecrate doesn't depend on his being in a state of grace but upon his being ordained; the sacramental character of Holy Orders is ...


2

Discussing the "Connection of the Gifts among Themselves and with Charity", John of St. Thomas writes in The Gifts of the Holy Ghost: Sinners living without grace can acutely discern, dispute, and even treat of divine things and of mystical or loving understanding as an object and matter of disputation. But they cannot use such an understanding as ...


1

TL;DR: it's not the sin itself which is "unto death" or "not unto death", but the attitude of the sinner that makes it so. We know that we are all guilty of sin: For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God — Romans 3:23 We know that sin leads to death: For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life ...


1

How many mortal sins did/does Satan do? Did Satan commit just one mortal sin? Satan lost sanctifying grace by committing the sin of pride alone (not envy, disobedience, or any other sin; cf. Hugon, O.P., Tractatus Dogmatici vol. 1 p. 693, PDF p. 353). Suárez's De angelis lib. 7 cap. 15 (pp. 897-910) goes into much depth regarding the question of "...


1

A blog article titled "Dies Domini 47: A History of Sunday Obligation" points to Pope John Paul II Apostolic Letter Dies Domini (1998) paragraphs 46 to 49, providing: a short history of Sunday Obligation expressed in church documents when it became mortal sin rationale and circumstances Paragraphs 46-47 below: Since the Eucharist is the very heart of ...


1

As Wtrmute mentioned, #2 & #3 are necessary for sin because sin is a bad human act, or as St. Augustine defined sin, "Sin is a word, deed, or desire against the eternal law." (Contra Faust. xxii). Since sin is a human act, the will is the subject of sin; there's no such thing as an involuntary sin. Regarding #1, chapter 15 of the 6th session of ...


1

Is it possible to repent after death in Catholicism? The short answer seems to be possibly yes immediately after death. There seems to be a pious belief amongst some Catholics that immediately after death Our Lord gives sinners a final chance to repent of their sins. Here I will let Padre St. Pio do the talking: "I believe that not a great number of ...


1

As omission of going to mass on holy days of obligation is mortal sin (with some exceptions), John would make another mortal sin by not going. This would make his situation even worse.


1

"Is this woman's concious denial of the gospel a mortal sin...?" No. or in a few more words: In the abstract, maybe, but it's fundamentally a meaningless statement. The question contains a misuse of the term "mortal sin" as used in Catholic theology. It's basically a category mistake. A mortal sin is a sin that leads to death (Heb. 10, 1 Jn 5). One of ...


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