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7 votes
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According to the Catholicism, is a conscious denial of the gospel of Christ a mortal sin?

The short answer is “not necessarily”. “Conscious” denial of the Gospel is not the same thing as denial “with full knowledge.” “Grave matter” vs. “mortal sin” In Catholic moral theology, a distinction ...
AthanasiusOfAlex's user avatar
7 votes

Can "feelings and passions" make an act involuntary?

Is someone strapping you to a chair, propping your eye's open, and forcing you to watch pornography? If not, then you certainly have freely chosen to watch it and doing so certainly is a mortal sin ...
Geremia's user avatar
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6 votes

According to the Catholic Church, if one, faced with the threat of being burned alive, denied Christ, would his sin be mortal?

Peter denied Jesus three times within a gap of an hour (Lk. 22 : 56-60) . But he repented immediately ( Lk 22: 62) and was later chosen by Jesus as the leader of His Church. See that Jesus gets it ...
Kadalikatt Joseph Sibichan's user avatar
6 votes

If a sin can be dispensed, is it really a sin?

"If a sin can be dispensed, is it really a sin?" No, a sin which is dispensed of could never be a sin, because a sin is an offense to God, and offending God can never be excused. "Does the Church ...
Sola Gratia's user avatar
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6 votes

What is the eastern Catholic and Eastern Orthodox understanding of mortal and venial sin?

There is no such distinction between "mortal" and "venial" sin in the fashion you suggest within the Eastern Orthodox Church, but it must also be understood that sin, as well as ...
guest37's user avatar
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6 votes
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In Catholicism, why is heresy a mortal sin?

Heresy is a species of unbelief, which is a sin against the theological virtue of faith, which resides in the intellect. St. Thomas Aquinas, discussing whether unbelief is the greatest sin, says (...
Geremia's user avatar
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5 votes

According to the Catholicism, is a conscious denial of the gospel of Christ a mortal sin?

AthanasiusOfAlex's answer is long, thorough, and well-referenced, in my opinion. Here I'd like simply to offer a brief summary, in light of some of the current (2016-08-12 18:34 GMT) comments: Case 1 ...
Matt Gutting's user avatar
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5 votes

Is it possible to repent after death in Catholicism?

Short answer: For the general case, no. Your question asks about both the general case, and an outlier case of suicide. That series of articles in the Catechism addresses in part whether or not the ...
KorvinStarmast's user avatar
5 votes

Is it impossible for a finite human to commit a mortal sin by its very definition?

Fallible humans can definitely fulfil the conditions to commit a mortal sin. Let's take a really clear cut case. Let's say I embezzled some money from my employer. A co-worker discovers this and tells ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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5 votes
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Is it a sacrilege to administer the Eucharist to non-believers?

Is it a sacrilege to administer the Eucharist to non-believers? The short answer would seem to be in the affirmative. However, one could possibly encounter situations in which a priest is unaware of ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is complete consent listed as a requirement for an act to be a mortal sin?

The objection is irrelevant. A decision on a matter that serious does not happen in isolation. CCC 1857 For a sin to be mortal, three conditions must together be met: "Mortal sin is sin ...
KorvinStarmast's user avatar
4 votes
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How does Catholic sacramental theology explain the efficacy of the sacraments conducted by a priest who is in the state of mortal sin?

A heretical, schismatic, or excommunicated priest can consecrate because (III q. 82 a. 7 ad 3): in consecrating the sacrament he speaks as in the person of Christ, Whose place he holds by the power ...
Geremia's user avatar
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4 votes
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How defined is the threshold of graveness for mortal sins? (Catholicism)

How defined is the threshold of graveness for mortal sins? (Catholicism) As with such matters of conscience, there will always exist some wiggle room in the definition here. Interesting question, as ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
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4 votes
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Is it a mortal sin for a Catholic to knowingly pass on his/her sickness to another person?

Is it a mortal sin for a Catholic to knowingly pass on his/her sickness to another person? That would depend on the gravity of the communicable disease in question. Has a Catholic commited a mortal ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
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3 votes

According to the Catholic Church, if one, faced with the threat of being burned alive, denied Christ, would his sin be mortal?

Fear (unlike compulsion/violence) doesn't take away involuntariness. The person in your scenario chooses to deny Christ, not in itself but only on account of avoiding what he fears. St. Thomas Aquinas,...
Geremia's user avatar
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3 votes
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Does a priest have to consume the Eucharist no matter the state of his soul?

Does a priest have to consume the Eucharist no matter the state of his soul? Can a priest decide not to consume the Eucharist during mass if in doubt whether he is in mortal sin? The short answer is ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
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3 votes

How do the 3 Protestant traditions deal with the two types of sin mentioned in 1 John 5:16-17?

Here is a quote from Dr. Bruce Milne, formerly lecturer in Biblical and Historical Theology at Spurgeon’s College, London. The Foreword to his book is by J.I. Packer. I believe this is still the ...
Lesley's user avatar
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3 votes

Do the conditions for mortal sin apply to non-catholics?

If the non-Catholic is not baptized, the non-Catholic has original sin and is damned, "unless before the end of life the same have been added to the flock," as Pope Eugene IV puts it in his Cantate ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 39.8k
3 votes

If you are in mortal sin but went to mass anyways are you in less of a sinful state?

TL;DR: no, for the same reason that one can't be "a little bit pregnant." I am going to answer in reverse order, since going to mass or not seems to be the active ingredient of this question. ...
KorvinStarmast's user avatar
3 votes

If a sin can be dispensed, is it really a sin?

I am trying to supplement Ken Graham's excellent answer because zippy2006 says it has not addressed the core issue posed in the question. My purpose is more of giving perspective, not trying to be ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
3 votes

Is sharing "Fake News" and gossiping "Fake News" a mortal sin? (Catholic perspective)

Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. The Eighth Commandment condemns lying. Because God is regarded as the author of all truth, the Church believes that humans are obligated to ...
Grasper's user avatar
  • 5,497
3 votes

Is it impossible for a finite human to commit a mortal sin by its very definition?

The thesis here is that there is no sin where the sin is known to be grave and fully consented to. Because of this, the question is how can one mortally sin The can be easily disproved using the ...
jaredad7's user avatar
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3 votes
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According to the Catholic Church, are sex positions that can’t bear children sinful?

#1 and #2 are sins against nature or the unnatural vice (Summa Theologica II-II q. 154 a. 11 arg. 3: sexual "acts from which generation cannot follow"), which is the greatest degree of lust (...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 39.8k
3 votes

In Catholicism, why is heresy a mortal sin?

In Catholicism, why is heresy a mortal sin? According to the Catholic Church the sin of heresy is a mortal sin because it is destructive to the virtue of Christian faith and it’s revolt against a ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
  • 72.4k
2 votes

Is the Catholic teaching regarding the definition of mortal sin de fide?

I don't know if there has been a solemn definition of the doctrine by a pope or council, but this definition is part of the deposit of faith. It is defined exactly as you state in the Catechism of the ...
ajjp5o7's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

If a sin can be dispensed, is it really a sin?

If a sin can be dispensed, is it really a sin? Let us first of all recall what Our Lord said to St. Peter, our first pope and head of the Catholic Church: 19 And I will give unto thee the keys of the ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
  • 72.4k
2 votes

In Catholicism since when did willfully violating Sunday Mass obligation become mortal sin?

Scriptural basis Exodus 20:8: Remember that thou keep holy the sabbath day. cf. Kellner's Heortology § 2. Sunday and its Observance as a Day of Rest (pp. 6-13) Holy Office's March 4, 1679, condemned ...
Geremia's user avatar
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2 votes
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In Catholicism, what happens to the gifts of the Holy Spirit after we committed a mortal sin?

Discussing the "Connection of the Gifts among Themselves and with Charity", John of St. Thomas writes in The Gifts of the Holy Ghost: Sinners living without grace can acutely discern, ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 39.8k
2 votes
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Is participation in the near occasion of mortal sin and openness to the possibility of sin, mortal itself?

Is entering into a near occasion of mortal sin a mortal sin? No, it is not, but it could be a venial sin. Is openness to committing mortal sin a mortal sin? No, not necessarily, but in some rare ...
zippy2006's user avatar
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