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16

It seems that there is an assumption in this question that suggests reason is preferable to judgment. Reason is appropriate when the problem is merely a misunderstanding, but judgment is appropriate when the problem is willful disobedience. It is likely that the place in the temple where the market had been set up was in the Court of the Gentiles. Thus, ...


16

I found an article from the Jehovah’s Witness official web site that indirectly answers your question. It uses the example of governments using income taxes to pay for wars and points out that it is the responsibility of governments to decide how tax payers’ contributions are spent: Watchtower 1 April 1975 – Are you guided by a sensitive Christian ...


15

Some Protestant groups, like those represented by the conservative R.C. Sproul Jr and the Acton Institute, believe that even if the government does nothing but evil, one nonetheless is obligated to pay taxes to support it, because what the government does is not the responsibility of the people supporting it but the fault of the government itself. This is ...


14

The quote is from 1 Tim 6:10 (which would have been written in Greek, not Hebrew). The Greek reads: ῥίζα γὰρ πάντων τῶν κακῶν ἐστιν ἡ φιλαργυρία Here are some translations: KJV: For the love of money is the root of all evil ASV, NRSV, TNIV: For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil NET: For the love of money is the root of all evils. The NET ...


11

Foundations: Taxation and private property are in tension The commandment (Exodus 20) "Thou shalt not steal" implies the right to private property, and this is everywhere assumed in Scripture (even in Acts 5). If princes had the unlimited right to tax, to any extent and for any purpose, there could be no private property. All would belong to the ...


11

For one, there's the obvious reference/fulfillment (quoted in John 2:17): Psalm 69:9 (NASB) For zeal for Your house has consumed me, And the reproaches of those who reproach You have fallen on me. My first thought is that Jesus, knowing their hearts (Mt 9:4, Mt 12:25/Lk 11:17), might have known that reasoning with them wouldn't have worked. (e.g. Lk 16:...


10

The question as posed contains an implicit assumption that needs to be challenged -- or at least teased out into the open. It is this: that numerical represention of character types in Jesus' parables ought to reflect the proportion of attention Jesus gave to them outside the parables. This is important for the the particular case of "wealthy vs. poor" ...


10

I was brought up as a Jehovah’s Witness. There are no “membership fees” and neither is a collection plate passed around at meetings. However, there are contribution boxes at the back of the Kingdom Hall and this is where Witnesses place their financial donations. Witnesses voluntarily contribute towards the running costs of the Kingdom Hall and the ...


8

In Hebrew culture, thirty pieces of silver was the price paid to the master of a slave if his slave was gored by an ox: “If the ox gores a slave, male or female, the owner shall give to their master thirty shekels of silver, and the ox shall be stoned” (Exodus 21:32). A prophetic reference to the thirty pieces of silver given to Judas Iscariot is found in ...


7

We often bring our own compromised perspectives to Bible texts and as a result struggle to understand the simplistic significance of a moment. Isaiah 56:7 these I will bring to my holy mountain and give them joy in my house of prayer. Their burnt offerings and sacrifices will be accepted on my altar; for my house will be called a house of prayer for all ...


7

According to The Economist, the Catholic church spent $171.6 billion in 2010. I haven't read the whole thing, but it seems to be a rather one-sided article, and little information is given about how they calculated the figure of $171.6bn, other than this: The sexual-abuse scandals of the past 20 years have brought shame to the church around the world. ...


7

The Church's Stance on Debt The official stance of the LDS Church regarding debt is summarized in the following statement from the Church's website: Since the early days of the Church, the Lord's prophets have repeatedly warned against the bondage of debt.... When it is necessary to incur debt, such as a reasonable amount to purchase a modest home or to ...


7

Is there a 'just interest rate'? The “just rate of interest” is the fair rate of interest which should corresponds to the average gain that those engaged in business may generally expect in a determined centre. According to the Catholic Church, the Catholic Encyclopedia explains it as such: Just rate of interest Even today one can still sin against ...


5

Evidently it was John Calvin who began the process of changing minds about usury by redefining it from usury to interest and outlining its importance. Here is a link to his letter. Chapter XI - Calvin's letter on usury As to Catholicism, Schaff (who also references Calvin) says this about its change of policy re Canon 17 of Nicea Council forbidding usury....


5

Much, much less than that, if anything. The $85billion figure has already been debunked in this question. Religious institutions would not pay $85b even if they were taxed as profit-making businesses. $85B would be around 3/4 of the entire amount of money donated to all religious organizations in the US. No entity pays 75% of its income in taxes - nor ...


5

The New American Bible (Revised Edition) is the translation that I have; this is the only translation which is authorized to be used in Catholic worship in the United States. The NABRE offers this as the dialogue (Mark 10:21–22): Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him, "You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to [the] ...


5

The one thing he lacked was actually the most important thing - saving faith in God. That he lacked this is evidenced firstly by his failure to put his trust wholly in Christ to follow Him no matter what, but also by his failure to obey the first (and greatest) commandment evidenced by him prioritising his wealth over the will of God. No one can serve ...


5

An important translation issue for this verse is that there is no definite article (the) in any Greek manuscript that precedes the word translated as "root". Thus, it is perhaps a better translation to say that the love of money is a root of all evil rather than the root of all evil. When we recall Satan's fall, it was not the love of money, but the love ...


5

Lending and expecting more in return is usury, a sin against justice. Usury condemned Old Testament Leviticus 25:36-7: Take not usury of him nor more than thou gavest. […] Thou shalt not give him thy money upon usury: nor exact of him any increase of fruits. New Testament Luke 6:35: love ye your enemies: do good, and lend (mutuum date), hoping for nothing ...


5

Jehovah’s Witnesses take seriously the direction in the scripture to “pay back Caesar’s things to Caesar.” We are obliged to pay the taxes that are demanded by the governments under which we live. Much of these funds go to beneficial things and much goes toward things we may object to on a personal level. For example the funding of military expenses that ...


4

It's a precept of the Catholic Church that her members should "provide for the needs of the Church", it's right next to going to Mass on Sundays and holy days and confessing your sins. The fifth precept ("You shall help to provide for the needs of the Church") means that the faithful are obliged to assist with the material needs of the Church, each ...


4

TL;DR: Bribes that pervert justice are condemned, but gifts which curry favour are allowed and sometimes even a sign of wisdom. שׁחד The Hebrew word for 'bribe' in these verses is the root שׁחד. It only occurs 25 times in the Hebrew Bible which means we can do a comprehensive word study pretty easily. Below I will list most of the verses with this root. I ...


4

To me it appears as though you're insisting on a critical scholarly approach to an elementary subject. The scriptures themselves seem to answer your original question of why there are more sayings about rich people than poor people: "But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in ...


4

The first thing to notice about the posts linked to in the question is that neither of the theologians in the discussion is claiming that all taxation is theft. Rick Phillips explicitly says "there is a legitimate basis for government taxation". The WeeFlea claims that Sproul believes that "all tax is theft" (both from links in the question). But there is no ...


4

A tithe is a gift in support of the ministry. In barter economies, giving good as opposed to currency might seem quite natural. Yet, even today, it's not uncommon for someone to provide a donation of physical goods or labor in lieu of or in addition to money. Coming to church with a steer might seem a bit odd (unless you live in a ranching community) but ...


4

Based on the frequency with which the word "tithe" is mentioned in Reformed churches, one might expect that Reformed theologians overwhelmingly believe in an obligation for giving 10%. But in fact, many prominent Calvinists do not believe it to continue as a command, such as John Owen, Francis Turretin, and John Gill.1 Many accept the tithe as a ...


3

Since of the Bible doesn't have a direct reference/listing of budgets, I believe the idea would come from teaching throughout. Everything from Joseph's wisdom Genesis 41:35-37 They should collect all the food of these good years that are coming and store up the grain under the authority of Pharaoh, to be kept in the cities for food. This food should be ...


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