16

Luther and Calvin Protestant negativity toward monasticism can be traced back to the Reformers, particularly Martin Luther. Luther was himself a monk, and after his conversion, he became progressively more opposed to the practice. In 1537, he wrote that monastic vows "must be absolutely abolished." He also frequently and enthusiastically ...


11

From Roman Cholij's Priestly celibacy in patristics and in the history of the Church: Although perhaps strange to our own modern ways of thinking, absolute marital continence was far from unknown or unesteemed in patristic times. Tertullian, himself a married man, informs us in his Catholic period, of lay people who practise continence within marriage «pro ...


10

In general, Baptists have historically harbored animosity towards anything that smacked of "papistry." Note, for example, John Bunyan's polemics in Pilgrims Progress. Add to that a fear of turning the Gospel into a "work," and you will see that it definitely goes against the grain of traditional Baptist upbringing. As always, with Baptists, nothing is ...


9

First of all, there is a difference between a monk, or a nun, and a person in consecrated life more generally: monks and nuns belong to cloistered orders and don't generally go "out into the world", whereas sisters and brothers belong to orders which do work "in the world". In either case, though, there is generally a process by which a person joins: ...


9

Monasticism is frequently associated with "the contemplative life", as opposed to "the active life". While there are many different kinds of monastics, an important subset is those who are chiefly engaged in maintaining a simple, prayerful life in an enclosed community, and are therefore found much more towards the contemplative end of the spectrum. The ...


7

While not specific to Queen Keran's situation, this section from Medievel English Nunneries 1 may provide some clues. Motives for taking the veil: a refuge for widows and occasionally for wives. The occasional cases in which wives left their husbands to enter a convent were less likely to provoke discord. Such women as left husband and children to ...


6

There are several different sets of rules for different communities of monks; and the specific penalties for the monks are dependent on the rule. Most communities of monks or nuns are governed by one of two sets of rules: the Rule of St. Augustine (of Hippo), and the Rule of St. Benedict (of Nursia). There are also governing documents such as the Statutes ...


5

"Black Canons" is another name for Augustinian canons regular. They are "black" because of their habit, according to the OED: black canon n. [from the colour of the habit worn; compare post-classical Latin canon niger (c 1220)] now chiefly hist. a canon regular of St Augustine (see note at canon n.2 1). Canons regular are Priests who are bound by ...


5

The first official stage of the religious life is the noviciate. Novices are not admitted to vows until they have successfully completed the prescribed period of training and proving, called the novitiate. This usually lasts one year. This is the period that the member of a religious community undergoes prior to taking vows (poverty, chastity and obedience) ...


4

Do all nuns wear these symbolic wedding bands? If not, is this practice limited to certain religious orders? Rings may be worn by some members of female Catholic religious institutions or Religious Orders. The privilege also extends to Consecrated Virgins living in the world. In 1963 the Second Vatican Council requested a revision of the rite of the ...


3

The quotation comes from the beginning of Chapter 4 of the Rule, where St. Benedict lists the "instruments of good works". The list begins by quoting several of the commandments: In the first place, to love the Lord God with the whole heart, the whole soul and the whole strength. Then one’s neighbour as if oneself. Then, not to kill. Not ...


3

A monk is not "married" to his monastery in any sense at all, so there is nothing to be annulled. If a monk wishes to leave the monastery, he can ask for an "indult of exclaustration" (canon 686 section 1), which can be granted by either the bishop or the pope, depending on what kind of religious institute ("order") the monk is in. Once the monk is granted ...


3

Who were the Black Canons on the Augustinian Priory of Inchmahome in Scotland? The Priory of Inchmahome was founded in 1238 by the Earl of Menteith, Walter Comyn, for a small community of the Augustinian order also called the Black Canons because of the color of their habits. What are Canon Regulars? Priests who are bound by religious vows and who live ...


3

Depending upon your usage of the word "monasticism" may render your question void. There are many Protestant groups who choose to 1) Live communally, 2) Bind themselves by communal rules, 3) Dedicate their community unto the service of the Lord and the help of the poor. Consider this article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Monasticism#...


3

To answer the O.P.'s question directly, the maximum penalty for breaking monastic vows is essentially expulsion from the monastery (which entails a dispensation from the vows). For the benefit of readers, in the Catholic Church, “monks” are those men who live in a monastic community, which entails a certain separation from the world and a dedication to ...


3

Actually, Orthodox nuns (and monks) have vows of celibacy also: The monastic vows are essentially not different from those taken at baptism, with the exception of the vow of celibacy. (Source: Orthodox Christian Monasticism) And they do not wear rings, since they believe Christ to have one Bride, the Church. For example, see these pictures: (source:...


3

From what I've read, I think that the wedding band given to a consecrated religious sister is given to her for the same reason it is given to a married laywoman. Womanhood is fulfilled quite as perfectly in a life of virginal chastity as in human marriage. And that is why the Church's ancient and elaborate ceremonial for the consecration of virgins has for ...


3

The monastic name is given at the Small Schema tonsuring by the person that performs it (a bishop or an abbot). It is him that chooses this name. He may or may not consult the monk himself or his community about it. The names don't have to be Greek. But they should be the names of existing saints or ones that relate to some Truths of Faith. The name is ...


3

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has the following to say about consecrated life in general (i.e. professing vows to live in a more dedicated expression of faith, as with friars, monks, sisters, and nuns). Emphasis mine: 916 The state of consecrated life is thus one way of experiencing a "more intimate" consecration, rooted in Baptism and ...


3

I don't recall this story, but that doesn't mean anything. The full text of the alphabetical collection of the Sayings of the Desert Fathers appears to be available here. As far as I can tell, it is a verbatim version of the Cistercian Publications 1975 edition (at least the Indices seem to match). The Evergetinos is an arrangement of teachings on various ...


2

What part do Monks play in the Christian church? This is a great question and one that I was unaware had been posted before; otherwise I would have answered it before now. It is more the up to the individual who joins a particular monastery is fit for them. Each monastery has a unique chrism and gifts they offer to the Church. Monks live their lives ...


2

The "instruments of good works" that are mentioned in the fourth Chapter of the Rule Of St. Benedict are to St. Benedict the tools that every monk should possess in order to attain eternal life. Chapter 4 lists 73 "tools for good work", "tools of the spiritual craft" for the "workshop" that is "the enclosure of the monastery and the stability in the ...


2

Can a Religious (a nun) be expelled from her order after a hysterectomy? The short answer is no. No religious would be expelled from their Religious Order simple because they got sick and doctors had to perform an hysterectomy. If she developed cancer and the hysterectomy was deemed necessary, there would be no sin in having an hysterectomy. The surgery ...


2

It was actually a marginal note at the end of a manuscript of St. Gregory the Great's Moralia in Job by 10th century copyist Florentius of Valeránica: Because one who does not know how to write thinks it no labor, I will describe it for you, if you want to know how great the burden of writing: it mists the eyes, it curves the back, it breaks the belly and ...


2

St. Thomas Aquinas described the necessity of studying God's creation in his Summa contra gentiles bk. 2 (Creation) ch. 2 ("That the consideration of creatures is useful for instruction of faith"): through meditating on His works we are able somewhat to admire and consider the divine wisdom; it leads us to admire the sublime power of God, and ...


1

Intellectual work of monks as a way to getting closer to God by understanding better His creation? This question reminds me of St. Benedict’s iconic expression that can be found in his Holy Rule: Ut In Omnibus Glorificetur Deus (That in all things may God be glorified - 1 Peter 4:11) As we more frequently see is his very well known motto: Ora et Labora (Work ...


1

I am going to give an answer, contrary to what I would normally do. That is to say without sources because this will be too long for a comment, yet based on personal experience in handling many different types of sacramentals. Many priests I know wear the rings of their father when they die, while others have the ring(s) of either of their parents placed ...


1

The answer to this question has to do with the two types of blessings and it seems that wedding rings fall under invocative blessings because they are not being blessed to be set aside for liturgical use. So you can sell or give away a wedding ring because it is an outward sign of the marriage bond and is no longer serving that function. Also if she was a ...


1

The last thing any one claiming to be Christian, be they Protestant, Catholic or whatever, is separate themselves from society for some idea that doing so is God ordained or even God pleasing. The command is to " Go into the world..." Mt.28:19,20, not cloister oneself on some mountain top. When we read " Come out and be separate,"2 Cor.6:14-18, the context ...


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