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18

Logically, there are two possibilities: either Jesus himself said such things or they were added to the tradition at a later date. Neither view offers a clear-cut explanation, so a wide variety of ideas for the "secretive" passages have been offered by Christian commentators and Bible scholars over the years. Jesus did not tell anyone to remain quiet ...


13

Jesus died for our sins What we (and the Bible) mean by the phrase "Jesus died for our sins" is that all sins have a penalty. We see the same thing in the justice systems of nations--for every crime, there is a penalty. When the penalty is paid, we say that justice has been served, and that's a good thing. Our sins are really rebellion against God, and ...


11

Old Testament prophecies are sometimes 'thematic', by 'type' or 'metaphor' as in the case of these three days. There are various places in the Old Testament that give special meaning to three days. The gospels however only refer to the prophecy of Jonah. Christ said that Jonah would be the 'sign' that God would give the Jews, as a rebuke for their obstinacy....


10

Abram to Abraham God had promised Abram that he would have a son and that it would be through his wife Sarai. Abram's name means "Exalted Father", which may have proven to be an embarrassment as he aged without children. This fits with God's promise, but he didn't receive that name from God but from his father. God gives him the name "Abraham", which ...


10

It does seem that the Jews hadn't understood that the Messiah would have to suffer, or that the suffering servant of Isaiah 53 was the Messiah. Apart from the verse you have quoted, there are other verses which suggest that the Jews didn't understand this. They understood that the Christ would be the "King of Israel" (Matthew 15:32), they knew that he ...


10

I think there is an assumption behind your question that is not quite right, regarding the Christian conception of "the Messiah". As David Stratton shows in his answer, the Messiah concept is originally Jewish, and Christians believe that Jesus is that very same Messiah, and the fulfilment of various prophecies. But bear in mind that most Christians ...


10

Christopher Wright authors the book Knowing Jesus Through the Old Testament to help modern day Christians make a correlation between Old Testament Israel and the Messiah-ship of Jesus Christ. I think this is the best resource for the answer to this question and the full text can be found here Wright begins his book by making the assertion that the Jesus of ...


10

The notes in my Bible say: [11:3] The question probably expresses a doubt of the Baptist that Jesus is the one who is to come (cf. Mal 3:1) because his mission has not been one of fiery judgment as John had expected (Mt 3:2). So the timeline becomes: Jesus enters the scene. --> John proclaims that he is the Messiah. --> John Baptizes. --> John is put ...


10

The most commonsensical explanation of the Messianic Secret is simple self preservation - not necessarily self preservation in the literal sense, but in terms of the mission of Jesus. He couldn't do what he was trying to do if it became well known that he was the messiah. In the time in which Jesus lived, Palestine was under Roman occupation. Jesus was ...


9

The term Messianic Jew refers to Christians who identify as Jewish, as compared to those who identify as Russian, English, Thai etc. Most of them are of Jewish descent, though there are some who are not but have chosen to identify themselves as Jewish. Most Messianic Jews believe there is a very strong continuity between the Hebrew scriptures and ...


7

A messiah is a saviour or liberator of a people in the Abrahamic religions. From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Messiah Mes·si·ah [mi-sahy-uh] noun 1 the promised and expected deliverer of the Jewish people. 2 Jesus Christ, regarded by Christians as fulfilling this promise and expectation. John 4:25, 26. 3 ( usually lowercase ) ...


7

The Septuagint is a Greek translation of the (Hebrew) Old Testament and was completed by 132 BC. As the Old Testament contains many references to an "anointed one" (transliterated to English as "Messiah"), the decision by the (Jewish) translators to translate this word to the Greek "Christos" would have been driven by the need to find the nearest equivalent ...


6

The Jews did expect Messiah to suffer but not not at all in the way in which he did. His suffering was only supposed to be a temporary set back as a King waging war against the Gentiles. He was expected to arrive and war with Gog and Magog. During that war against the Gentiles, both He and Israel would suffer, only to gain victory over the entire Gentile ...


6

Yes. Daniel, who wrote during the Babylonian Empire prophesied that Messiah would come after four succesive Kingdoms. One which had already existed, the Babylonian, would be taken over by the Persian, then the Persian taken over by the Greek. The Greek then taken over by the Roman, then Messiah overthrowing the Roman. This is not just a Christian re-...


6

I found a quite incredible article on the parallels of Jesus and the nation of Israel. I remember hearing a few of these before, but not anything close to what he has. To summarize... Both Jesus and Israel came of miraculous births in the land of Israel. Both flee to Egypt to avoid danger (Herod and starvation) Both are brought back from Egypt. Both come ...


5

In John 8:58, Jesus says to the Pharisees, "Before Abraham was, I am". He was pointedly using the same language that God himself used when speaking to Moses in Exodus 3:14, and the Pharisees understood clearly that Jesus was claiming to be God. That's why they tried to stone him for blasphemy.


5

Isaiah 44:6 “Thus says the Lord, the King of Israel, And his Redeemer, the Lord of hosts: ‘I am the First and I am the Last; Besides Me there is no God. Revelation 22:13 I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last.” Jesus = THE first and last (true) Yahweh = THE first and last (true) Jesus = Yahweh (true) (two ...


5

Why do Christians consider Jesus to be the king of the Jews? Jesus is the heir of David: And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. And the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob ...


5

In the Old Testament there are two general strains of prophecy commonly read by Christians as being about the Messiah who was to come: Prophecies of a king in the line of David Prophecies of God himself coming to his people Judaism generally accepts the first class of prophecy as being about the prophesied Messiah, but not the second. And a strict reading ...


5

The first Messianic prophecy occurs in the first book of the Bible, Genesis 3:15., probably written in the 15th century BC. We can't readily distinguish the chronology between the 5 books of the Pentateuch (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy), but they were among the first books of the OT to be written. Job is actually normally considered the ...


4

When Christians say "Jesus died for our sins", what do they mean? This is a reference to 1 Corinthians 15:3: For I handed on to you as of first importance what I in turn had received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures. Different Christians understand "Christ died for our sins" in different ways; there have been many ...


4

Surprisingly some ancient rabbis did actually draw the connection of the Messiah to the creation of the world. Under this classical Messianic text, a connection was made: There shall come forth a shoot from the stump of Jesse, and a branch from his roots shall bear fruit. And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the Spirit of wisdom and ...


4

The verses of Jeremiah 31:31–34 appear in seven paragraphs in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, of which six (quoted below) are directly relevant. In all of these, Christ the Messiah is the bringer of the New Covenant, which is to be written on the hearts of his people. This is entirely Biblical. The writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews quotes the ...


4

In his book, Eternity in Their Hearts, Don Richardson details what he calls "A World Prepared for the Gospel", which is the title of the first section of the book. People of the Lost Book Chapter 2 is entitled "Peoples of the Lost Book", which details tribes that bemoan the fact that their ancestors had lost "the book" from God. Some of them looked ...


4

I was born and raised an orthodox Israeli Jew, and was an orthodox Rabbi for many years before becoming Messianic in 2008. The main body of beliefs are the same for Christians and Messianic Jews. However, the way we interpret scripture, and practice our faith can be very different indeed. Shabbot shalom to you all.


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