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22

There was a gap of about 400 years between the two Testaments, with the OT covering a vast time span, from creation till then. Taking the time from after the Flood, that alone has been variously calculated as 2,454 years to 2,518 years. This means that the OT deals with about two and a half thousand years of history after the Flood, whereas the NT only ...


20

If you read the whole Bible from Genesis to Revelation, you'll notice: God's consistent character, who is compassionate and merciful to those who love and fear Him but who pours out His wrath to those who are rebellious, unthankful, unfaithful, and disobey His commandments. In the OT He revealed his character to Abraham, Moses, David, the prophets, etc; in ...


18

Logically, there are two possibilities: either Jesus himself said such things or they were added to the tradition at a later date. Neither view offers a clear-cut explanation, so a wide variety of ideas for the "secretive" passages have been offered by Christian commentators and Bible scholars over the years. Jesus did not tell anyone to remain ...


17

Wrath is an important part of God's nature. I think a good way into answering this question is to ask the question, 'What did Jesus save us from?' They tell how you turned to God from idols to serve the living and true God, and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead – Jesus, who rescues us from the coming wrath. (1 Thessalonians 1:9-...


13

Jesus died for our sins What we (and the Bible) mean by the phrase "Jesus died for our sins" is that all sins have a penalty. We see the same thing in the justice systems of nations--for every crime, there is a penalty. When the penalty is paid, we say that justice has been served, and that's a good thing. Our sins are really rebellion against God, and ...


13

Paul explains there are two covenants. First we need to understand them. Galatians 4:21-26 21 Tell me, you who desire to be under the law, do you not hear the law? 22 For it is written that Abraham had two sons: the one by a bondwoman, the other by a freewoman. 23 But he who was of the bondwoman was born according to the flesh, and he of the freewoman ...


10

The notes in my Bible say: [11:3] The question probably expresses a doubt of the Baptist that Jesus is the one who is to come (cf. Mal 3:1) because his mission has not been one of fiery judgment as John had expected (Mt 3:2). So the timeline becomes: Jesus enters the scene. --> John proclaims that he is the Messiah. --> John Baptizes. --> John is put ...


10

Abram to Abraham God had promised Abram that he would have a son and that it would be through his wife Sarai. Abram's name means "Exalted Father", which may have proven to be an embarrassment as he aged without children. This fits with God's promise, but he didn't receive that name from God but from his father. God gives him the name "...


10

Christopher Wright authors the book Knowing Jesus Through the Old Testament to help modern day Christians make a correlation between Old Testament Israel and the Messiah-ship of Jesus Christ. I think this is the best resource for the answer to this question and the full text can be found here Wright begins his book by making the assertion that the Jesus of ...


10

I think there is an assumption behind your question that is not quite right, regarding the Christian conception of "the Messiah". As David Stratton shows in his answer, the Messiah concept is originally Jewish, and Christians believe that Jesus is that very same Messiah, and the fulfilment of various prophecies. But bear in mind that most Christians ...


10

The most commonsensical explanation of the Messianic Secret is simple self preservation - not necessarily self preservation in the literal sense, but in terms of the mission of Jesus. He couldn't do what he was trying to do if it became well known that he was the messiah. In the time in which Jesus lived, Palestine was under Roman occupation. Jesus was ...


9

Yes. Daniel, who wrote during the Babylonian Empire prophesied that Messiah would come after four succesive Kingdoms. One which had already existed, the Babylonian, would be taken over by the Persian, then the Persian taken over by the Greek. The Greek then taken over by the Roman, then Messiah overthrowing the Roman. This is not just a Christian re-...


9

The term Messianic Jew refers to Christians who identify as Jewish, as compared to those who identify as Russian, English, Thai etc. Most of them are of Jewish descent, though there are some who are not but have chosen to identify themselves as Jewish. Most Messianic Jews believe there is a very strong continuity between the Hebrew scriptures and ...


7

A messiah is a saviour or liberator of a people in the Abrahamic religions. From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Messiah Mes·si·ah [mi-sahy-uh] noun 1 the promised and expected deliverer of the Jewish people. 2 Jesus Christ, regarded by Christians as fulfilling this promise and expectation. John 4:25, 26. 3 ( usually lowercase ) ...


7

The Septuagint is a Greek translation of the (Hebrew) Old Testament and was completed by 132 BC. As the Old Testament contains many references to an "anointed one" (transliterated to English as "Messiah"), the decision by the (Jewish) translators to translate this word to the Greek "Christos" would have been driven by the need to find the nearest equivalent ...


7

In Luke 24, Jesus says this to the two men walking to Emmaus: 25 He said to them, “How foolish you are, and how slow to believe all that the prophets have spoken! 26 Did not the Messiah have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?” 27 And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures ...


6

I found a quite incredible article on the parallels of Jesus and the nation of Israel. I remember hearing a few of these before, but not anything close to what he has. To summarize... Both Jesus and Israel came of miraculous births in the land of Israel. Both flee to Egypt to avoid danger (Herod and starvation) Both are brought back from Egypt. Both come ...


5

In John 8:58, Jesus says to the Pharisees, "Before Abraham was, I am". He was pointedly using the same language that God himself used when speaking to Moses in Exodus 3:14, and the Pharisees understood clearly that Jesus was claiming to be God. That's why they tried to stone him for blasphemy.


5

Isaiah 44:6 “Thus says the Lord, the King of Israel, And his Redeemer, the Lord of hosts: ‘I am the First and I am the Last; Besides Me there is no God. Revelation 22:13 I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last.” Jesus = THE first and last (true) Yahweh = THE first and last (true) Jesus = Yahweh (true) (two ...


5

Why do Christians consider Jesus to be the king of the Jews? Jesus is the heir of David: And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. And the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob ...


5

In the Old Testament there are two general strains of prophecy commonly read by Christians as being about the Messiah who was to come: Prophecies of a king in the line of David Prophecies of God himself coming to his people Judaism generally accepts the first class of prophecy as being about the prophesied Messiah, but not the second. And a strict reading ...


5

The first Messianic prophecy occurs in the first book of the Bible, Genesis 3:15., probably written in the 15th century BC. We can't readily distinguish the chronology between the 5 books of the Pentateuch (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy), but they were among the first books of the OT to be written. Job is actually normally considered the ...


5

People see this wrathful God in the OT and then think he does an about face in the NT. Unfortunately, what people fail to realize is that the wrath of God still exists. A perfect God by nature would be required to demand a propitiation for the sin committed by humanity. You see, what changed was not God's wrath but rather the object of his wrath. Instead of ...


5

A cursory reading of the Bible -- the punishments in the Old Testament vs. Jesus' miracles and forgiveness of sins in the New Testament -- can lead one to the conclusion that God is full of wrath in the Old Testament yet has seemingly changed to become more loving in the New Testament. A more careful examination indicates that God is loving, merciful, and ...


4

When Christians say "Jesus died for our sins", what do they mean? This is a reference to 1 Corinthians 15:3: For I handed on to you as of first importance what I in turn had received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures. Different Christians understand "Christ died for our sins" in different ways; there have been many ...


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