8

I don't think there is any council-wide declaration about this, but most of the clergy will advise against such practices. To see why, we need to look into the traditional orthodox spirituality (hesychasm). The Holy Fathers put a complete and definitive set of spiritual practices which include fasting, remembrance of death, remembrance of own sins, Jesus' ...


7

As broad as it may appear, here is how we can summarize it. Matthew 22:35-40 (NIV) One of them, an expert in the law, tested him with this question: “Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?” Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and ...


6

I am unaware of any protestant denominations that have a special focus on contemplative prayer, but I'm also unaware of any that outright ban it. In my experience it is practiced only by a minority of Protestants, and that they are spread throughout many denominations. Of course it is practiced only by a minority of Catholics too. A good place to start is ...


5

The actual question is : Are there any specific rules at all in any denomination of Christianity? I am Roman Catholic and can answer for my denomination. Rules about prayer, meditation, and devotion ... The laity are expected to attend Mass each Sunday and on other specified Holy Days of Obligation, and to faithfully pray and meditate the various ...


5

Perhaps it is because of this confusion that you describe that your title and body do not really seem to match. I will try to clear up this confusion and answer your underlying question. The question seems to be: "Why are Christians not more concerned with ritual and seem so divided on what they should do as Christians? Why are they so different from ...


4

Hesychasm is foundational to Eastern Orthodox Christianity and is one of the things that distinguishes it from Roman Catholicism and the Protestant confessions that arose out of Roman Catholicism. The watershed event in Orthodoxy regarding hesychasm was the so-called "Hesychastic Controversy", that occurred on Mt. Athos in the early 14th century. Gregory ...


3

The current usage of the word meditation is strongly linked to buddhist/zen/hindu practices of sitting in a certain position, breathing in a certain way, focusing on emptying the mind and ultimately altering one's consciousness. That kind of meditation and any other spiritual practices from other religions are strictly forbidden by the Orthodox Church for ...


3

Yes, Eastern Orthodox Christianity is against doing Yoga, meditation and whatever else 'new age' practisisms. Those practisisms are NOT Orthodox. Please read this article. It talks about the incompatibility of Yoga And Orthodox Christianity. It is written by Father Charles Joiner of the Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Greenville, South Carolina. P....


3

About meditation in general, I can recommend you Ascent to Mount Carmel by saint John of the Cross, a famous 16th century mystic. It's not an easy reading, but it's a good guidebook of Christian mysticism. Along with few things that are good to do, author warns against many dangers in spiritual life, which may seem marginal in the beginning but may lead you ...


3

Zazen, based on the definition in Wikipedia, is not a biblical practice. With biblical meditation, we ponder God's word and works to get full and true insights into this life. We might look within in order to see what our desires are, but then we interpret those desires and feelings according to the word of God. Proverbs 3:5 tells us not to lean to our own ...


2

I think the Biblical model of meditation is not to do with emptying your mind, but on filling your mind with the good things of God. There are plenty examples in Psalms: Ps 119: 15 I meditate on your precepts . . . Ps 119: 97 Oh, how I love your law! I meditate on it all day long. Ps 77: 12 I will consider all your works and meditate on all your mighty ...


1

If you are interested in mystical traditions you may want to look further afield: There are surprising parallels with "For the first time you [lift your heart to God with stirrings of love], you will find only a darkness, and as it were a cloud of unknowing [...] Whatever you do, this darkness and the cloud are between you and your God, and hold you ...


1

The first book which comes in my mind at reading your question is "The Practice of the Love of Jesus Christ" of St. Alphonse de Liguori, that I highly recommand. The thoughts St Alphonse provide really deeps the faith. Furthermore, St Alphonse de Liguori likes to quote St Therese D'Avila, a very great catholic mystic. Meditations are not guided, but the ...


1

As Christians, the material, buzz words, we come across while thinking about meditation will be: Transcendental Meditation Traditional Christian Meditation Modern Christian Meditation Biblical Meditation We are taught to pray, fast and meditate, but lack basic teaching on the last. It would be helpful to list out, then, a framework to guide us in our ...


1

You should ask yourself these questions... Is my reason for meditation for good or for ill? Do I meditate for God or for myself? Do I replace God with meditation? Does my meditation harm my body, mind, heart, or soul? Does my meditation hinder my relationship with God or does it promote it? Do I do "Christian" meditation or only transcendental meditation (...


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