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17

The Revised Common Lectionary (by far the most common, used by Roman Catholics, Episcopalians, Methodists, and others) is a three year cycle, and if you attend every Sunday, you are guaranteed to hear selections from every book of the canon, but not necessarily the entirety of each book. That said, there are several texts you will hear repeated, either for ...


14

Why are we "eating" the flesh and blood of Christ? 1. Because Jesus commanded us to In the institution of the Eucharist, Jesus explicitly commands us to eat the bread and drink the wine, saying "This do in remembrance of me." Indeed, as often as we do this, we do "proclaim the Lord's death until He come." Indeed, John goes even further, recording Jesus in ...


14

Before the Gospel is read, a Catholic makes signs of the cross, with the thumb, on his or her forehead, mouth, and heart, which represents that the Catholic must understand the Gospel, proclaim it, and "take it to heart," i.e., put it into practice, with charity. Dom Prosper Guéranger's Explanation of the Prayers and Ceremonies of the Holy Mass (...


11

Communion under Both Kinds article at Catholic Encyclopedia has answer to both of your questions Does anyone know when this practice first became accepted? During early times public Communion in the churches was received under both kinds. But side by side with the regular liturgical usage of Communion, there existed from the earliest times the custom of ...


11

Why does the Catholic church have so many Masses throughout the week? It is because of what Mass is to the catholic church. Mass is the Single most important commandment given by Christ to do until the end of times (Do this in remembrance of me Lk 22 / 1 Cor 11). "At the Last Supper, on the night he was betrayed, our Savior instituted the Eucharistic ...


11

There's no difference between the two in respect of Eucharistic transubstantiation; hence answering "the spiritual", "the natural", or "both" are equally meaningless. My answer to a question on the Catholic understanding of the nature of transubstantiation is supposed to make it clear that what is changed in transubstantiation is the substance of the bread; ...


10

Yes, willfully skipping mass is a grave (mortal) sin. The key word here is willfully - being physically unable to attend, sick, or having other (legitimate) obligations is a valid excuse for not attending. From the Catechism: The Sunday Eucharist is the foundation and confirmation of all Christian practice. For this reason the faithful are obliged to ...


10

If by “Tridentine Mass” the O.P. means the Mass promulgated by Pope Pius V in 1570 (probably better termed the “traditional Roman Rite”), which was used widely in that form until the liturgical reforms after Vatican II (and is still used to varying degrees today), then the answer is that it is basically only used in Latin, with a small number of exceptions ...


10

Why do Catholics sign themselves three (3) times just before the Gospel is read? To understand the significance of this tradition, let us take a look into its origins. Concerning the making the sign of the cross at the proclamation of the Holy Gospel, after the deacon or priest says, “A reading from the Holy Gospel according to ….,” he and the faithful ...


9

In the earliest centuries of the Church, there wasn't a pattern of using liturgical languages, as much as trade languages. In the East, Greek was predominantly used because whereas it was the first language of few people, it was a second language for many people. It's use could symbolize the internationality of the Church, but more practically, it made it ...


9

Contrary to what you say about missals, the rubrics in my missal (The CTS New Daily Missal) say that before the reading of the gospel, "He [the deacon/priest] makes the Sign of the Cross on the book and, together with the people, on his forehead, lips, and breast." (emphasis added)


9

[UPDATED, substantially revised, and corrected] The short answer is that the obligation to attend Sunday Mass begins when children reach the age of reason, age seven at the earliest. Children become subject to Canon Law as soon as they are baptized: Canon 96 of the Code of Canon Law [CIC] says, By baptism one is incorporated into the Church of Christ ...


8

The practice is entirely biblical. At the Last Supper, Christ took a single cup at the end of the meal and handed it round the apostles: Mt 26:27 And he took a cup, and when he had given thanks he gave it to them, saying, “Drink of it, all of you; for this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.” The ...


8

How can one characterize (a rite)? A rite represents tradition about how sacraments (not just Mass) are celebrated. As the early Church grew and spread, it celebrated the sacraments as would be best understood and received in the context of individual cultures, without ever changing their essential form and matter. Which forms of Mass (rites) are ...


8

Another exception to Athanasius' answer is Mass in the Ordinariate Use, published in Divine Worship: The Missal in 2015. This order is in traditional-language English ("thee, thou" etc), and it's possible to construct an English-language Mass which is practically identical to the Traditional Latin Mass. We celebrate one such Mass weekly, and have even used ...


8

Priests and bishops of the Eastern Churches in full communion with the Bishop of Rome may concelebrate at any celebration of the Eucharist in any rite, including the Latin Rite, provided they have the permission of the diocesan bishop or eparch. The Code of Canon Law is silent on this issue, but the Code of Canons of Oriental Churches (CCEO) says, A ...


8

May a priest validly celebrate a mass without anybody else present? The short answer is: Yes. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) says, “Mass should not be celebrated without a minister or at least one of the faithful, except for a just and reasonable cause. In this case, the greetings, the introductory or explanatory remarks, and the ...


8

It is directly pulled from the Bible. Based on my answer to this question: As far as scripture goes, the salutation is from Ruth 2:4 and 2 Chronicles 15:2 in the Vulgate. In Ruth, the phrase appears in the sentence, "Et ecce ipse veniebat de Bethlehem dixitque messoribus: 'Dominus vobiscum'. Qui responderunt ei: 'Benedicat tibi Dominus'." ("[Boaz himself] ...


7

It is the English translation of Deo Gratias, which is repeated “in thanksgiving for the graces received at Mass” (Catholic Encyclopedia).


7

Code of Canon Law states: 766.0 Lay persons can be permitted to preach in a church or oratory, if necessity requires it in certain circumstances or it seems advantageous in particular cases, according to the prescripts of the conference of bishops and without prejudice to 767.1 767.1. Among the forms of preaching, the homily, which is part of the ...


6

As far as why individual Catholics participate in the various liturgies and sacraments, there can be all sorts of reasons, from the highly religious to the merely social or cultural. The Church does have teachings on the subject, though; let's look at those. As far as going to Mass on Sundays (and some other days): This is a requirement for Catholics. In ...


6

By what Church permission or instruction is the priest allowed to skip the Act of Penitence and the Kyrie Eleison On some occasions, for example, when the Mass is joined to another rite such as the celebration of a sacrament or the Divine Office penitential rite can be omitted (GILH 94-95). Other than this the Act of Penitence cannot be skipped. Regarding ...


6

From a Catholic point of view, there is no problem with (a) a Roman Catholic attending an Orthodox Divine Liturgy and receiving communion or (b) an Orthodox attending a Roman Catholic mass and receiving communion. This is, however, restricted to circumstances when a Roman Catholic mass is unavailable. The Orthodox position is different; Roman Catholics ...


6

Portions of the liturgy were permitted to be celebrated in Native American vernaculars.


6

If we count the lawful liturgical variants of the Tridentine Mass such as the Dominican Rite and the Carmelite Rite and permission given to some Religious Orders, we able to see that the Holy See has given various indults for the Tridentine Mass to be celebrated in various languages. Although Latin prevails in the West as a unified liturgical language, in ...


6

The short answer is yes, they do. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, what is called "Mass" is usually referred to as "Divine Liturgy" or "Liturgy", although I have seen a Prayer Book from the Antiochian jurisdiction also use the term "Mass". There is a strict rule within the Eastern Orthodox Church, however, that Divine Liturgy cannot be served at the same ...


6

"Aurora" in Latin means "dawn", as opposed to "sunrise" (which is "ortus solis", the rising of the sun). This would mean, more or less, the period at which the sky was visibly bright. The reason for selecting this time was undoubtedly so that Mass would not fall before celebration of Lauds, that part of the Divine Office which was intended to open the day. ...


6

What should a priest who commits a mortal sin just before Holy Mass do, if confession is not available? The priest in question must make a perfect act of contrition as best he can and must go to confession as soon as possible. He may under some circumstances still say Mass. The Church has very clear guidelines on this subject: When receiving or ...


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