19

No, there is no reliable historical evidence to support such a claim. Before going into the question significantly, I should point out that the number of Baptists killed by the Catholic Church depends on how one defines "Baptist" - apparently, there are some who consider any early sect of Christianity which did not practice infant baptism to be a "proto-...


12

Was any martyr of the Church sawn in two, as mentioned in Hebrews? The short answer is yes. The term "death by sawing" indicates the act of sawing a living person in half, either sagitally (usually midsagitally), or transversely. Thus, decapitation by sawing or dismemberment by sawing are tangential sub-themes, though some ambiguous cases might be ...


8

Judas, of course, hung himself after betraying Jesus James is the only other Apostle whose death is recorded in Scripture, in Acts 12:1-2 It was about this time that King Herod arrested some who belonged to the church, intending to persecute them. 2 He had James, the brother of John, put to death with the sword. The rest of the Apostles deaths are ...


5

There is a few things to consider in order for the answer to make sense: We have multiple opportunities while we are alive to repent, be forgiven, fall into sin, learn from our mistakes, repent again, and so on. We are basically building christian character and receiving grace to help us in our journey to heaven. It is not a one time deal. We die one time. ...


4

Although Ken Graham offers one interpretation of the events leading to the stoning of Saint Stephen, I would like to propose an slightly different perspective which I think better fits the biblical text: Especially Acts 6-7. On an intersting note, Stephen's grave has recently been uncovered in the West Bank City of Ramallah. My simple answer regarding who ...


4

Who ordered Saint Stephen to death? No individual person ordered St. Stephen to be stoned to death. If in fact someone had ordered Stephen’s execution, I believe St. Luke would have named that individual in the Book of Acts. At this they covered their ears and, yelling at the top of their voices, they all rushed at him. - Acts 7:57 Moreover, the Jews ...


4

Fr. Pedro de Corpa and his Companions are currently not Saints, but Servants of God. There is currently a procedure for canonization started, which is now in the second phase. An August 20, 2014 article in Our Sunday Visitor (J.J. Ziegler, Georgia martyrs died defending Church teaching, in OSV Newsweekly) gave the following information: The path to the ...


3

To clarify the definition of martyrdom, in both Islam and Christianity, martyrdom is achieved by dying, not specifically by taking a life, although in some cases one's death may involve taking the lives of others. The Catholic Church has certainly canonised individuals who died fighting for the Christian cause, but sainthood is not open simply to all who do ...


2

It does seem unlikely, that number is supposed to be representative of a period of about 1,200 years, but even over that period of time you'd still have to kill at least 114 baptists a day to reach that number. There's always a high estimate and a low estimate when calculating casualties, my initial assumption is that 50 million is the high estimate, and may ...


2

This site provides a copy of the purported prison diary written by Saint Perpetua, written around 203 CE. The diary forms part of the non-canonical Acts of Perpetua and Felicitas, also known as The Passion of St. Perpetua, St. Felicitas, and their Companions. It is a beautifully crafted story and many believe Perpetua and Felicity really existed and that ...


2

Although this is a more speculative question than ones based on facts, it may be possible to give a reasonable (logical) answer. First of all, St. Seraphim of Sarov (1754-1833) was glorified (canonized) by the Russian Orthodox Church on July 19, 1903. What is interesting here is that Pope St. John Paul II referred to him as a "saint" in his book ...


2

It is dogma that non-Catholics cannot be martyrs: …no one, whatever almsgiving he has practiced, even if he has shed blood for the name of Christ, can be saved, unless he has remained in the bosom and unity of the Catholic Church.—Pope Eugene IV, Council of Florence, decree Cantate Domino (Martyrs, saints, all those in heaven are saved.)


2

How did the Apostle Matthew died? We simply do not know for sure. The facts about his death have not been historically proven, beyond a reasonable doubt. Of Matthew's subsequent career we have only inaccurate or legendary data. St. Irenæus tells us that Matthew preached the Gospel among the Hebrews, St. Clement of Alexandria claiming that he did this for ...


2

Foxe's Book of Martyrs used to be considered a standard textbook on the matter, but whether it is still considered so to be, I wouldn't know. It is certainly an excellent source. It is said (I don't know how true it is) that in England (I assume this refers to the seventeenth century, or so) there were fireplaces in homes that had two niches in them, one ...


2

While a complete answer on this subject would take volumes, there are many Christians who were martyred, not for simply being of the wrong religion, but for actions they felt compelled to take because they were Christians. In the Roman era, Christians weren't persecuted because they had a different religion. There were lots of different religions in ancient ...


2

What historical evidence is there of the Slaughter of the Innocents? Apart from the Gospel of St. Matthew, it seems that there is a serious lack of any recognized historical evidence for the slaughter of the Holy Innocents. “Then Herod, when he saw that he had been outwitted by the wise men, flew into a rage. He gave orders to massacre all the male ...


2

After trawling through related questions on Christianity Stack I found a link to a Catholic website that provided the following information on what happened to these apostles: Saint Peter – Catholic Information: The New Testament says nothing about Peter's life after his presence at the meeting in Jerusalem with James and Paul (Acts 15). Later sources ...


1

There is no historical consensus on the person of Matthew. There are several conflicting accounts, and the Greek text does not state anywhere he was an eyewitness (and therefore a disciple). Clement of Alexandria quotes Heracleon, one of the earliest commentators on the New Testament, as saying that Matthew died naturally: “But neither will this ...


1

It could be suggested that one try reading the Acta Sanctorum. In addition to the extraordinary amount of biographical material, extensively researched, the Acta Sanctorum broke new ground in its use of historical criticism.The Bollandist movement began with John Bollandus, a Jesuit who published volumes of saints’ lives at Antwerp in 1643. These volumes ...


1

Origen (quoted by Eusebius) declared that Paul was beheaded in Rome under the reign of Nero. Although Clement of Rome writes about the martyrdom of Peter, he does not mention Rome. There does not appear to be any dispute about the time, the place and the manner of Paul’s beheading, but not everyone accepts the Church tradition that Peter was martyred in ...


1

The first mention is from the Epistle of Clement written circa 96 CE. It mentions that both Peter and Paul were martyred. Though not specifying clearly that it was during Nero's reign, it may be inferred (see footnote 31 below). Peter, through unrighteous envy, endured not one or two, but numerous labours and when he had at length suffered martyrdom, ...


1

John Foxe, in his 'Book of Martyrs', 1563, catalogues his sources regarding the martyrdom of Paul and Peter. Of the recorded history of Paul's death, Foxe quotes : Eusebius, Hierom, Maximus, and other authors do but briefly pass it over; so Abdias, (if his book be of any substantial authority,). . . . Of the sources of the record of Peter's death, he ...


1

The synoptics use to group many teachings of the Lord in the same block. To know whom Jesus was talking to, you have to read verses before and after Luke 21:16-19. Nothing says he was talking to the twelve only. The Catechism of the Catholic Church also sees this passage as refering to the persecussion of christians at all ages : Before Christ's second ...


1

The History of Romanism by John Dowling published in 1845 is where the statistic probably comes from as it's pretty much a verbatim claim. Unfortunately, the footnotes on page 542 say that: No amount of computation can reach the number -History of Romanism Page 542 - footnote#1


1

I think I can begin to offer an answer to this, though it's still bit's and pieces. Basically, my guess is sometime in the 4thC, (as far as it is possible to tell, given the fragmentary nature of the sources) though it is clear that some number or other seems to be assigned to the death toll relatively early on. My reason for thinking this: R. Brown's The ...


1

If you define a martyr as someone who sheds their blood in the name of Christ, the answer is no. (Pope Eugene IV, Ecumenical Council of Florence) It [i.e. the Catholic Church] firmly believes, professes and preaches that all those who are outside the catholic church, not only pagans but also Jews or heretics and schismatics, cannot share in eternal life and ...


1

TL;DR The treatment of martyrs as saints has varied considerably over the years. It started as an almost spontaneous, bottom-up approach, spurred by initial persecutions under the Roman Empire, where martyrs and their relics were "spontaneously" venerated (i.e. treated as saints, in modern terminology) by Christians. Later on, as the Church grew in size and ...


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