31

Genesis 2:24–25 (ESV): Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and they shall become one flesh. 25 And the man and his wife were both naked and were not ashamed. Genesis pretty clearly views them as husband and wife, even giving their union as foundational to all other marriages.


30

Once she receives the sacrament of Baptism, is she required to convert to Catholicism for that Baptism - and therefore the marriage - to be valid in the eyes of the Church and in the eyes of God? First off, Baptism is pretty big deal in the Catholic Church. In order to ensure that the adult is serious and understands what it entails, they must go through ...


17

TR;DR So long as the persons have not rendered themselves impotent, there is nothing preventing two transgender persons from marrying one another. However, the Church essentially recognizes only the so-called biological sex of the persons. Hence, she would regard the transgender “man” as a woman, and the transgender “woman” as a man. In general, the ...


16

It's important to understand who 'they' refer to. From verse 23 we know the Lord is talking directly to the Sadducees, which say that there is no resurrection. They were asking a question to bait/trap the Lord in contradicting Moses, the lawgiver (see Deut 25:5-10). Remember this question is about what happens in the resurrection when the Sadducees don't ...


15

The answer, in essence, is “no.” In principle, there is no obstacle to the marriage of any baptized Catholic man to any baptized Catholic woman, regardless of race. This is a principle at least as old as St. Paul: For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is ...


15

From your comments you are asking strictly about members of the opposite sex who live in the same house, without any kind of sexual relations. There is, as far as I know, no absolute prohibition on this. In fact I have known several Christians who have shared houses with members of the opposite sex and nobody has objected in any way. However I do understand ...


14

Some time back I dug into this subject of weddings in olden Biblical days, just out of curiosity . This is summary of sort of what I found. Bible speaks of three "C" of weddings: Contract, Consummation, Celebration. These same things exist today in modern marriages but the order and timing of each stage is different. Ancient Jewish weddings never involved ...


14

Having multiple wives was permitted (though not exactly endorsed) in the Law of Moses. Adultery is having (or desiring) an intimate relationship with someone who's already married (to someone else). As it was forbidden in the Mosaic law, it was referring to a man and someone else's wife. It was not really speaking of a married man and another woman. Even ...


14

Luther did not recant. From: John Alfred Faulkner, "Luther and the Bigamous Marriage of Philip of Hesse, The American Journal of Theology Vol. 17, No. 2 (Apr., 1913), pp. 206-231 (on pp. 228-9) - Whatever occasional regret on account of the scandal Luther may have felt, he never wavered as to the essential right of his course with Philip. In June, 1540, ...


13

What a “dispensation” is First of all, a “dispensation” is a legal term, in which the competent authority relieves one of its subjects from having to follow a law (or part of a law) in a particular case. The Code of Canon Law describes dispensations as follows: A dispensation, or the relaxation of a merely ecclesiastical law in a particular case, can be ...


12

I would first like to thank you for asking in a polite and constructive way! The following answer is based on my experience as a member of a congregation which is accepting of QUILTBAG people - a category which includes the minister - and their loving relationships; not everyone is in favour of same-sex marriage, but we've talked about it quite a bit. I have ...


12

Definition: An annulment doesn't dissolve a marriage; an annulment is a solemn pronouncement that there never was a marriage contract (as explained in the pronouncement) and, therefore, what was perceived as a marriage was in fact null. Why: In order for a marriage to be valid, it cannot be null. If a marriage is ruled to be null then the couple can either ...


12

There's not a lot that can be done in this particular instance. One possibility is for Alice to argue that if Ben saw fit to leave, he didn't seem to be taking the marriage vows very seriously, and perhaps the marriage wasn't valid after all. Catholicism regards marriage as including a permanent state of fidelity to one's spouse; Ben's leaving might be used ...


11

This question at first seemed like a non sequitur to me, but it actually comes from an interesting place. The Eastern Orthodox churches use the Greek word μυστήριον (musterion) to refer to sacraments, but the word actually means 'mystery', and many Orthodox would prefer the term Sacred Mystery over sacrament. Ephesians 5:31-32 says that the joining of a man ...


11

From Roman Cholij's Priestly celibacy in patristics and in the history of the Church: Although perhaps strange to our own modern ways of thinking, absolute marital continence was far from unknown or unesteemed in patristic times. Tertullian, himself a married man, informs us in his Catholic period, of lay people who practise continence within marriage «pro ...


11

Clement of Alexander likely was referring to Philippians 4:3 Yes, I ask you also, true companion (σύζυγε), help these women, who have labored side by side with me in the gospel together with Clement and the rest of my fellow workers, whose names are in the book of life. (ESV) The word σύζυγε (lexical form σύζυγος) is a hapax legomenon within the New ...


11

I believe this to be a valid question because there can be confusion here. HUMANEA VITAE 11. The sexual activity, in which husband and wife are intimately and chastely united with one another, through which human life is transmitted, is, as the recent Council recalled, "noble and worthy.'' (11) It does not, moreover, cease to be legitimate even when, ...


11

Yes, there is a term: legitimate children Canon 1137 of The Code of Canon Law: “The children conceived or born of a valid or putative marriage are legitimate.” Canon 1061 of the Code of Canon Law “An invalid marriage is called putative if it has been celebrated in good faith by at least one of the parties, until both parties become certain of ...


11

Does God intend or call some people to live alone forever in their life? The short answer is that it is very possible. There are four basic states of life within the Catholic Church: marriage, consecrated life, priesthood and the single state as an unmarried lay person. Trying to find one’s true vocation in life is for some individuals a task that will ...


11

There were no priests then who could marry them. But given that priests are only God's representatives on Earth, God clearly could marry them. Genesis 1:28, already quoted by others, can be understood as a ceremony of marrying: God blessed them and said to them, "Be fruitful ..." This has both core elements we associate today with a marriage: The ...


10

Perhaps some things should be clarified a bit here first. First part of your question: I'm told that according to Mormon doctrine, a Mormon woman has to be granted entry into heaven by her Mormon husband. Assuming my impression is correct, ... Not really. Unmarried women can certainly get to heaven -- and depending on what you mean by "heaven," ...


10

Short Answer: Yes. Just as a person can honor God without getting married, a couple can honor God without having children. From a Biblical perspective, Paul's advice in 1 Corinthians 7:17-35 is highly relevant: Only, as the Lord has assigned to each one, as God has called each, in this manner let him walk. . . . Was any man called when he was already ...


10

A married person cannot be elected, because the pope is Bishop of Rome and married people cannot be bishops. Can 1042: The following are simply impeded from receiving orders: a man who has a wife, unless he is legitimately destined to the permanent diaconate; Canon law does allow married men to become deacons (as stated there), and also priests with the ...


10

The word for "help meet" means more than just a helper. She was to be his counterpart. This is not limited to just man's ministry, but to everything in his life. She was not to be seen as lesser, or just a helper, but as his divinely appointed co-equal complement. This quote I believe explains it better. God Himself gave Adam a companion. He provided “an ...


10

(This is not really a 'Christian' answer, but then your question isn't really a 'Christian' question.) If 'sexual chemistry' is a thing, is there any guarantee that it will survive a wedding, or 7, 10, 20 years of married life and child-bearing-induced-body-morphing? If not, your 'test drive' won't help much. You'll need something other than 'lust' to stay ...


10

The short answer is "no," an annulment is not a Catholic divorce. Although the term "annulment" has come into common use, it is somewhat misleading, since it makes it seem as if an existing marriage is "annulled" or "cancelled." In fact, Church law does not use that term, but instead contemplates a declaration of the ...


10

What an interesting find! The Biblical text in view is indeed 1 Cor 9. The key to understanding how they derived this interpretation is knowing what Clement and Eusebius meant by the words translated in the question as "greet" and "wife". Clement explains the relationship between the apostles and women (Stromatum III, 53; Greek, English): But the [...


10

The Essentials Marriage is a Sacrament. The Church has nothing to do with a divorce. (That's a civil matter). The passages in Matthew 19 and Mark 10 are pretty clear about Moses permitting divorce because the peoples' hearts had hardened, while the original law is that "two shall become one flesh" which Jesus pointedly reminds his audience. (You'...


10

Pope Calixtus I, who died around 222, permitted the marriage of high born women to men of a lower class, and even to slaves. This was contrary to Roman law, so the Pope was recognising as validly married people who by law were not married, and could not be married. The Catholic Encyclopaedia comments: Here again Callistus was rightly insisting on the ...


10

Can a bishop allow Marriage between cousins? The short answer is yes: first cousins can marry if the diocesan bishop grants an appropriate dispensation. To understand the question at hand let us start by looking at what Canon Law has to say about "Specific Diriment Impediments" to marriage. Can. 1091 §1. In the direct line of consanguinity marriage is ...


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